WHEREAS the increasing incidence matter of policy that it is opposed in of derbies as a factor in the utilization

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2 Page 2 AUGUST, 1953 Forty-four Canadian geese have been transplanted from Warner Valley to the Sauvie Island management area in an effort to establish a breeding population of geese on the island. Bird banding activities in recent weeks included the banding of 164 band-tailed pigeons in the Nehalem area, 400 doves in Warner Valley and 22 Canadian geese in Malheur county. Hunters are urged to report any banded birds killed. Spring spawning operations at East Lake yielded 452,736 rainbow eggs, which was only about one-half the usual number. Weather conditions delayed the breaking up of the ice with the result that many of the fish had spawned under the ice by the time the spawning crew could start trapping the fish. Results of a pheasant mowing loss study conducted in Malheur county showed that 183 hens were killed and 358 nests destroyed on 889 acres mowed by the 35 contacts made. Aerial salting of big game ranges was done in the Umatilla and Heppner districts during June. Over three tons of salt were dropped. At the Hermiston game farm 13,000 chukars were hatched this spring so that it appears probable over 10,000 will be raised. Liberations of young chukars, as well as pheasants, started in July. The northeast district received a planting of 790 mature chukars during June. Printed copies of the 1952 Bulletin index are now available to anyone forwarding a request. COVER A herd of blacktail deer in the Wagner Butte area south of Ashland. (Photo by Toni McAllister) Derbies P. W. SCHNEIDER, State Game Director The question of derbies as an adjunct to the utilization of the fishery and game resources of Oregon has for many years been a topic of discussion among the citizens of the state. In recent years the employment of such incentives has become more prevalent, not only in Oregon but in many other states as well. The Oregon Game Commission has from time to time been confronted with inquiries from the angling and hunting public as well as from those interested economically in derbies regarding their attitude toward such activities. In response to these repeated inquiries, the Commission has felt that although it has no regulatory authority with respect to derbies, it does have an obligation to make known its position with respect to this matter as a matter of policy. The following statement represents the formalized position of this Commission. WHEREAS the increasing incidence matter of policy that it is opposed in of derbies as a factor in the utilization principle to the employment of derbies or similar competitive devices as an in- centive to induce increased utilization of the fishery and wildlife resources of the State of Oregon for the following reasons: 1. Such devices constitute artificial incentives to increased pressures on fish and game which may, from time to time and if carried to an extreme, jeopardize the basic reproductive stock of some species. 2. The non-competitive and non-ex- ploitative use of the fish and wildlife resources of the state is growing at a rapid rate and it does not appear neces- sary nor in the best interest of the re- sources to subsidize this use in order to stimulate even heavier use and drains upon these resources. 3. The encouragement of competitive incentives in the recreational use (Continued on Page Seven) of the fish and game resources of Oregon has brought about numerous requests from widely varied interests for an expression from the Oregon State Game Commission as to its official stand on this question; and WHEREAS the Oregon State Game Commission has for many years informally opposed derbies but no formalized statement has ever been issued; and WHEREAS in issuing a statement regarding this question the Commission recognizes that it has no regulatory jurisdiction over such matters but does have, in response to repeated requests, an obligation of frankly making known what it believes to be in the best interest of the resource with respect to this question; THEREFORE, the Oregon State Game Commission does hereby express as a Oregon State Game VOLUME VIII AUGUST 1953, NUMBER 8 Published Monthly by the OREGON STATE GAME COMMISSION 1634 S. W. Alder StreetP. 0. Box 4136 Portland 8, Oregon MIRIAM KAUTTU, Editor H. C. SMITH, Staff Artist Commission Bulletin R. U. Mace Big Game C. E. Kebbe Waterfowl, Furbearers Frank Stanton Habitat Improvement W. V. Masson Upland Game H. L Rayner Chief of Oper., Fishery Div. E. W. Goff Hatcheries Fred E. Locke Stream and Lake Mgt. John Dimick Coordinating Biologist George Kernan Engineer G. E. Howell Fishways and Screens MEMBERS OF COMMISSION Kenneth G. Denman, Chairman Medford REGIONAL SUPERVISORS Don Mitchell Taft Will H. Brown Northeast Region Delbert Gildersleeve Baker Box 742, La Grande H. Van Winkle _ Oregon City Leslie Zumwalt Elmer H. Balsiger Northwest Region Klamath Falls 1224 E. 8th, Albany ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF L. M. Mathisen Central Region P. W. Schneider.State Game Dir. C. B. Walsh Asst. State Game Dir. F. B. Wire Secretary F. C. Baker Controller H. R. Mangold _Chief, Supply and Property Arthur Higgs Attorney C. J. Campbell _Chief, Basin Investigations R. C. Holloway Chief, Info. and Educ. John McKean _Chief of Oper., Game Div. A. V. Meyers Federal Aid 222 E. 3rd, Bend J. W. Vaughn _Southwest Region Box 977, Roseburg W. C. Lightfoot Southeast Region Box 8, Hines Entered as second-class matter September 30, 1947, at the post office at Portland, Oregon, under the act of August 24, Permission to reprint is granted provided proper credit is given.

3 On July 10th the Oregon Game Commission established tentative hunting regulations for the 1953 seasons after receiving information and recommendations from interested organizations and individuals from all parts of the state at a public hearing on that date. A second public hearing was held on July 24th and with a few minor adjustments the regulations were formally adopted. The opening date for the deer season was the subject of greatest interest with recommendations ranging from as early as September 1 to as late as October 10. In establishing the hunting regulations the Commission gave greatest attention to the current status of the game resources as indicated by annual inventories obtained by their field agents and the expressed desires of the many recommendations submitted. The purpose of this article is to explain some of the conditions which led to the formulation of this year's regulations. (See Page 6.) Antelope: An indicated decline in Oregon's antelope herds during the past year induced the Commission to close onethird of the antelope range and reduce the number of tags by one-half in the open areas. Fawn survival has been declining for the past four years with last September's measurements indicating only 49 fawns per 100 does. The 1953 spring inventory provided a count of 5,657 antelope and a density approximately one-third lower than in the spring of This indicated de- By JOHN McICEAN, Chief of Operations, Game Division cline is believed largely due to wider distribution of the animals during the past open winter. The 400 antelope hunters should enjoy good hunting as the current sex ratio is approximately 44 bucks per 100 does. In order to assure better distribution of hunters, tags will be issued by area and will not be transferable; however, the open season in the two areas will be concurrent. Deer: The general deer season is scheduled to open on October 3 and extend through October 16 for bucks with forked antlers. On October 17, 18, 19 and 20 hunters that have not been successful during the buck season will have an opportunity to harvest deer of either sex in large portions of the state. With regard to the opening date of deer season it should be explained that weather and fire records defend an early October opening date, and although the past two seasons have given forest protective agencies some cause for concern, there is no reason to believe that weather conditions will not conform to past normals this season. The position of forest protective agencies was strengthened by the 1953 legislature in that the State Board of Forestry now has authority to make differ. ential fire closures and the Governor has authority to make a blanket closure of hunting seasons when it is apparent that an extreme emergency exists. The hunter's choice deer season is based upon the fact that a similar season in 1952 had no detrimental effect upon Oregon's deer herds and available evidence indicates that a limited harvest of antlerless deer will be beneficial to both the public and the deer herds. In 1952 the area open was similar with the exception that the national forests in northeastern Oregon were closed. The resultant concentration of hunters on private lands adjacent to the forest was beneficial in that it encouraged a harvest of deer that were causing damage to winter ranges and agricultural crops but aroused the concern of many landowners. In view of this concern of landowners and a substantial increase in deer of northeastern Oregon forests, the forests will also be open during the hunter's choice season this fall. In western Oregon the hunter's choice area is again restricted to agricultural lands where resident deer cause damage to berries, orchards, and other high value crops. The Commission has no desire to increase the harvest of blacktails on the recently burned and logged timber lands in the coast range and Cascades where hunting pressure is heaviest during the buck season. The outlook for the 1953 deer season is very good in that bucks were not heavily cropped in western Oregon last fall and the mild winter has permitted an excellent carry-over of 1952 fawns. The wet spring has induced an excellent growth of forage plants which should keep the animals in good flesh and well distributed over the available (Continued on Page Four)

4 Page 4 AUGUST, Game Outlook (Continued from Page Three) summer range. The season also opens during the dark of the moon so that deer are more likely to be moving about during daylight hours. One controlled deer season will be held on former Camp Adair lands, which are now owned by Oregon State College and used as a field laboratory by the schools of forestry and agriculture. The season will permit 300 hunters to harvest buck deer on an area that has been closed to hunting since Students from the school of Fish and Game Management will assist with conduct of the season and study the effects of hunting upon the deer population. Elk: The elk season extends from October 31 through November 22 and should give Oregon's hardy elk hunters ample opportunity to comb the woods in quest of the mighty elk. An indicated reduction in the elk herds on the north slope of the Wallowa mountains induced the Commission to remove the either-sex bag limit in that area but otherwise the open areas are similar to last year. Prospects for the 1953 elk season are good in that the dry 1952 hunting son and the following mild winter gave elk an excellent opportunity to survive and increases should be evident in most herds. A controlled elk season will give 200 hunters with unused elk tags an opportunity to bag bull elk with three or more antler points in the Salmonberry- Kilchis river area in Tillamook County on November 21, 22 and 23. Permits for this season must be applied for in September on an application form that will be available at all license agencies. The object of this season is to permit an orderly harvest of bulls and encourage a better distribution of elk in Tillamook County. A second controlled elk season is authorized for elk of either sex on the Indian Creek range near Dale in Grant County. This season is designed to permit the selective harvest of elk that are contributing to the depletion of an important winter range. Hunter success in this area will be largely dependent upon weather conditions because elk numbers will be low until storms drive them down from higher ranges. Access may also be difficult because there are few roads into the area and they may be blocked with snow. A late either-sex season is authorized for control of a serious winter elk damage problem on dairy lands along the upper Lewis and Clark river. The area is small (one mile wide and five miles long) and the elk will be protected by heavy cover. Recognizing that heavy hunting pressure will be required and that the area will not be attractive to the average hunter, the Commission has made no attempt to limit the number of hunters participating in this season. There are not over 150 elk in the area and hunting conditions will probably not be pleasant in December. Archery Seasons: Nearly 3,000 archery permits were issued in 1952 and 1,897 archers reported a harvest of 224 deer on six areas. Recognizing the rapid growth of interest in bow hunting the Commission has authorized eight archery areas for this fall. The Clatskanie area has been abandoned and in recognition of past fire hazards the Tillamook area will not open until October 3. The White River and McDonald forest areas should prove very attractive for bow hunters and partially alleviate the heavy pressure on the Tillamook area. Bow hunters are granted these opportunities to avoid the competition of rifle hunters because their weapons require close stalking. However, a bow and arrow hunter must purchase a deer or elk tag to accompany his archery permit and in the event he fills his tag during an archery season, he is not entitled to hunt the species during the rifle season. Pheasants and Quail: Upland game birds are short:lived and must be managed as an annual crop because birds of the year normally provide 70 to 80 per cent of the shooting. The spring inventory reveals that an excellent breeding population of pheasants and quail survived the winter with 5,994 pheasants and 4,177 quail observed on 28,186 acres of habitat censused. However, cold weather and rains appear to have caused a loss of young birds during May and June. The Commission's field agents have consistently found it impossible to predict bird crops with accuracy by early July when regulations are set, because the birds are hidden in unharvested crops and heavy losses can occur later in the summer. Brood counts obtained during the two weeks prior to the July 10th meeting revealed that of 1,062 hens observed, only 510 had broods. Broods averaged 6 chicks and the average number of chicks per hen was 2.7 which is substantially lower than the 4.4 chicks per hen observed at a similar time last year. Recognizing the limitations of early brood counts as an indicator of production and with knowledge that breeding populations were high, the Commission authorized liberal hunting seasons with the intention of reducing them after their second hearing if subsequent findings supported such action. By July 24 a substantial number of late broods were observed and the bird seasons were confirmed. The open season for pheasants and quail will extend from noon October 24 through November 8 in western Oregon.and through November 15 in eastern Oregon. Hungarian partridge may also be hunted on these dates in eastern Oregon; however, there will be no open season on bobwhite and valley quail in Malheur county. (Continued on Page Five) Season Antelope Adair Deer Tillamook Elk Indian Creek Elk DRAWINGS FOR CONTROLLED BIG GAME SEASONS No. Tags or Permits Season Dates Aug Oct. 24, 25, 30, and Nov. 1 Nov Dec. 5-9 Bag Limit "Applications Available 'Fee One Buck July 29 $5.00 One Buck Sept. 1 None One 3 pt. Bull Sept. 1 None One Elk Sept. 1 None Applications Close Drawing Date 10 a.m. Aug. 11 Sept. 22 Sept. 22 Sept. 22 * * A special application form must be used in applying for any of the controlled season tags. These forms will be agencies and the Game Commission office. Applications by letter will not be accepted for the drawings. Free permits valid only when accompanied by an unused general deer or elk tag. Aug. 13 Sept. 24 Mailing Date Aug. 14 Sept. 25 Sept. 24 Sept. 25 Sept. 24 Sept. 25 available at all game license

5 AUGUST, 1953 Page Game Outlook (Continued from Page Four) Prospects for pheasant hunters are brightest in Malheur county; however, good hunting should be available in all but the coastal counties. In the Willamette Valley, Lane, Linn and Benton counties are expected to provide the best shooting. Quail hunting should be good in nearly all counties but Jefferson, Crook, Deschutes and Wheeler counties are expected to be the best. Sage Grouse: Sage grouse populations are subject to violent fluctuations at approximately ten year intervals. This behavior was observed in most of Lake county during the winter of when grouse dropped from a high density to a condition of scarcity in one season, but a similar loss did not occur in Harney and Malheur counties. This year it appears that sage grouse are on a downward trend throughout their range and in recognition of this condition the Commission has reduced both the length of season and the bag limit. The open season for sage grouse extends from August 22 through 27, with a bag limit of 2 grouse per day or 4 during the entire season, in portions of Lake, Crook, Harney, Deschutes, and Malheur counties. Blue and Ruffed Grouse: The grouse season is scheduled to open with the pigeon season on September 1 and extend through September 10. This includes the three-day Labor Day week end. Good grouse hunting can be expected in both western and eastern Oregon this year with a bag limit of 3 per day and 9 for the season. Migratory Birds: Regulation of the harvest of migratory birds is the province of the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the state only has authority to regulate within the maximums established by that agency. The Fish and Wildlife Service will announce 1953 regulations in mid- August after they have completed a survey of breeding grounds to determine the size of this year's crop. Information available indicates the probability that Oregon hunters will enjoy another liberal waterfowl season this fall and a bonus of pintails and widgeon. A continuing decline of band-tailed pigeons on the more popular Willamette Valley shooting stands gives the Commission cause for concern; how- Personnel of the game division at their annual conference and training program held in June on the E. E. Wilson Management Area near Corvallis. Barracks on the property provided meeting, sleeping and eating quarters. ever, large numbers of pigeons have been observed along the coast this summer and good pigeon shooting can be expected in that area. Public shooting grounds will be operated in the same manner as last year and will provide over 15,000 hunting days for unattached hunters. Last year 31,217 ducks and geese were harvested on four public shooting grounds. Trapping Regulations: Oregon's trapping regulations have been further liberalized this year to encourage a greater harvest of beaver. The beaver season will open on November 1 in Lake and Harney counties to permit trapping of high ranges, and on November 15 in the remainder of the state. The beaver season extends through February 15. The current low value of furs has discouraged many trappers and harvest of nearly all fur species has been low for the past four years. During the season 1,188 trappers reported a harvest of 85,629 furbearers, 10,374 of which were beaver. General Regulations: Few changes were made in general regulations pertaining to tagging of game or manner of taking. Gun regulations were amended to permit the use of the Johnson semi-automatic rifle which is now being offered to the public as a sporting arm. However, the magazine must be plugged so that it is not capable of holding more than five cartridges and it will be unlawful to use military ammunition in either original or altered form. With these restrictions the Commission does not believe that this rifle will be any greater hazard to wildlife and public safety than other semi-automatic rifles. Summary: Although it is difficult to forecast the weather and general hunting conditions that will prevail during this fall's hunting seasons, the Commission has authorized comparatively liberal regulations which should provide Oregon's quarter-million hunters ample opportunity for outdoor recreation with a minimum of hazard to other enterprises and resources. Hunters should recognize that their conduct while afield will influence future hunting conditions and police themselves with respect to fire prevention, vandalism and game law violations. Carelessness in these respects will result in further denial of access to private and forest lands. Although many hunters may consider the 1953 regulations more liberal than the resources can withstand, the Commission has confidence that the seasons will not create a hazard if each hunter adheres to the established limits and practices good sportsmanship.

6 Page 6 AUGUST, Hunting Regulations (Complete regulations to be published in Hunting Synopsis) Antelope Season Bag limit, one adult buck antelope having horns longer than the ears. Area I: No open season. Area II: Open season, August 22 through August 27. Number of permits, 200 (residents only.) Open area: Portions of Lake and Harney counties as follows: Beginning at the intersection of the Ft. Bidwell-Warner Valley road with the California-Oregon state line; thence northerly along the Fort Bidwell-Warner Valley road through Plush and Adel to its junction with U. S. Highway 395 north of Abert Lake; thence northeasterly along U. S. Highway 395 to its junction with U. S. Highway 20; thence easterly along U. S. Highway 20 to Burns; thence southeasterly along Oregon Highway 78 to Follyfarm; thence southwesterly along the county road through Andrews to Fields; thence south along Oregon Highway 205 to Denio; thence west along the California-Oregon state line to its intersection with the Warner Valley road, the point of beginning. Area III: Open season, August 22 through August 27. Number of permits, 200 (residents only). Open area: Portions of Harney and Malheur counties as follows: Beginning at Denio; thence northerly along Oregon Highway 205 to Fields; thence northeasterly along county road through Andrews to Follyfarm; thence northwesterly along Oregon Highway 78 to Burns; thence east and north along U. S. Highway 20 to its intersection with the Idaho-Oregon state line at Nyasa; thence south and west along the state line to Denio, the point of beginning. Buck Deer Season Open Season, October 3 through October 16 in all counties for black-tailed and mule deer; and In Douglas county for white-tailed deer. Bag limit, one deer having not less than a forked antler. Hunter's Choice Deer Season Open season, October 17 through October 20. Bag limit, one mule or blacktail deer of either sex for those hunters possessing unused deer tags. Eastern Oregon Open Areas (east of summit of Cascade range): 1. All lands east of U. S. Highway No. 97 except the following described portions: (a). Beginning at the junction of U. S. Highway 97 and State Highway No miles south of Lapine; thence northerly along U. S. 97 to junction with the Arnold Ice Cave-Brooks- Scanlon logging road approximately 4 miles south of Bend; thence southeasterly along said Arnold Ice Cave-Brooks-Scanlon road to junction with the China Hat road in Section 3, Township 21 South, Range 14 East; thence southerly along the China Hat road to Cabin Lake Ranger Station; thence westerly along the old stage road to its junction with State Highway 31 at Shevlin; thence westerly along State Highway 31 to its junction with U. S. 97; the point of beginning. 2. That portion of Wasco county east of the exterior boundaries of the Mt. Hood National Forest north of State Highway 52 and west of U. S. Highway All of Hood River county within one mile of established cultivated agricultural lands and outside the exterior boundaries of the Mt. Hood National Forest. Western Oregon Open Areas (west of summit of Cascade range): 1. On or within one mile of established cultivated agricultural lands and outside the exterior boundaries of national forests in Jackson, Josephine, Coos, Lane, Linn, Benton, Polk, Yamhill, Clatsop counties; that portion of Washington county west of State Highway No. 47; and that portion of Douglas county south of the following described line: Beginning at the mouth of the Umpqua river at Reedsport; thence east along the Umpqua river to Elkton; thence east along Oregon Highway 38 to its junction with U. S. Highway 99 at Drain; thence northeasterly along U. S. Highway 99 to its intersection with the Douglas-Lane county line at Divide. For purposes of this regulation, established agricultural lands shall be construed as currently cultivated lands not less than 10 acres in extent that have been plowed, tilled, and planted to domestic crops. Areas adjacent to isolated home gardens and abandoned farmsteads will not be considered open to hunting under this regulation. 2. Portions of Coos and Curry counties west of a line one mile east of U.S. Highway No. 101 from Bandon to the California line. 3. Clackamas County, all lands outside the exterior boundaries of national forests except that the following described area will remain closed: Beginning at the intersection of the Mt. Hood National Forest boundary and the Crown Zellerbach Corporation 100 Road, thence west along the 100 Line Road to its intersection with posted road in Sec. 31, Township 5 South, Range 3 East; thence south along the posted road to its junction with the Molalla River, thence southerly along the Molalla River to the South Fork of the Molalla River; thence southeast along the South Fork of the Molalla River to the national forest boundary; thence north along the forest boundary to the point of beginning. 4. Columbia county. All open. 5. Marion and Multnomah counties, all lands outside the exterior boundaries of National Forests. 6. Washington county. All lands east of State Highway No. 47. Controlled Deer Season Adair Tract or Forest Peak Area (Benton county): Open season, October 24, 25, 31, and Nov. 1. Number of permits, 300. Bag limit, one deer having not less than a forked antler. Tag required, unused general deer tag. checking station. Open area: Beginning at the intersection of the Tampico School Road (County Road No. 65), and the Soap Creek Road in Section 24, Township 10 South, Range 5 West, thence northwesterly along the Tampico School Road approximately 41/2 miles to a posted fence in Section 4, Township 10 South, Range 5 West; thence southwesterly along posted fence approximately 1/3 mile. thence in a northwesterly direction along posted fence approximately 1/2 mile to posted road; thence westerly and southerly along posted road to juncture with Soap Creek Road in Section 26, Township 10 South, Range 5 West; thence along Soap Creek Road in a northeasterly direction to point of beginning. General Elk Season Bag limit, one elk only by holder of a general elk tag. (Sex and age class determined by area and season in which elk is killed.) Western Oregon: Open season, October 31 through November 22. Bag limit, one bull elk with three points or more, including the brow tine, on one antler. Onen area: That portion of Oregon west of U. S. Highway 97, except the following areas which are closed to elk hunting: All of Polk, Washington, Yamhill, and Jackson counties; that part of Douglas county east of U. S. Highway 99; and all of Tillamook county except the northwest corner bounded on the east by State Highway 53 and on the south and west by U. S. Highway 101. Eastern Oregon: Open season, October 31 through Nov. 22. Bag limits: One bull elk with antlers in the following described area: Beginning at Arlington; thence south and east along Oregon Highway 19 to Kimberly; thence east along Kimberly-Long Creek road to Long Creek; thence north along U. S. Highway 395 to its intersection with the road up the middle fork of the John Day River; thence southeast up the middle fork road to its intersection with U. S. Highway 26 one mile south of Bates; thence easterly along U. S. Highway 26 to its intersection with Burnt River in Section 6, Township 13 South, Range 37 East; thence northeasterly along Burnt River to Durkee; thence northwesterly along Highway 30 to Baker; thence south along Oregon Highway 7 to its junction with the Sumpter Valley road at Salisbury; thence northwesterly along the Sumpter Valley road to Sumpter; thence north along the Fruit Creek road to the summit of the Blue Mountains; thence northerly along the summit to its posted intersection with the Anthony Lakes road; thence north along the Anthony.Butte road past Porcupine G. S. to the North Powder road; thence easterly along the North Powder road to its junction with old U. S. Highway 30 at North Powder; thence northerly along old Highway 30 to Telecaset; thence easterly along the posted road to Medical Springs; thence easterly along the posted logging road to its junction with the Flagstaff Butte road; thence northerly along the Flagstaff Butte road past Flagstaff Butte to its junction with the Mule peak trail; thence along the Mule Peak trail to the summit of Mule Peak; thence easterly along the summit of the Eagle Mountains to the Blue Creek trail north of Cornucopia; thence southerly along the Blue Creek trail to Pine Creek; thence downstream along Pine Creek to its junction with the Snake River; thence following the State line north and west to Arlington, the point of begining. Either sex: One elk of either sex in the area east of U. S. Highway 97 with the exception of that portion described above restricted to bull elk having antlers. Controlled Elk Seasons Lewis and Clark (Clatsop county): Open season, November 28 to December 31. Each hunter required to have an unused general elk tag. Bag limit, 1 elk of either sex. All elk taken must be tagged with metal seal of the Game Commission before transporting from the area. Tagging station at Crown Zellerbach Camp. Boundary: Within one mile of the Lewis and Clark River (exclusive of tributaries) between the mouth of Heckard Creek and the Bridge No crossing the Lewis and Clark River on the 400 Line Road, but not across the 400 Line Road at any point. Tillamook Burn (Tillamook and Washington counties): Open season, November 21, 22, and 23. Number of permits, 200. No fee. Each hunter required to have a general elk tag as well as special free permit. Bag limit, one bull elk with three points or more, including the brow tine on one antler. area. Open area: Beginning at the junction of U. S. Highway 101 and Oregon Highway 6 in the town of Tillamook; thence northerly along U.S. Highway 101 to its junction with the Miami River-Foley Creek county road near Garibaldi; thence northerly along the Miami River-Foley Creek county road to its junction with the Nehalem River county road; thence easterly along the Nehalem River county road to the confluence of the Nehalem River and Salmonberry River; thence southeasterly along the Southern Pacific Railroad grade to Cochran; thence southerly along the Standard Logging Company road to its junction with the Story Burn road ; thence southerly along the Story Burn road to its junction with Wilson River Highway No. 6 near Owl Camp; thence southwesterly along the Wilson River Highway to Tillamook, the point of beginning. Indian Creek (Grant county): Open season, Dec. 5 through Dec. 9. Number of permits, 200. (No Fee). Each hunter required to have a general elk tag as well as the special free permit. Bag limit, one elk of either sex. area. Open area: Beginning at Dale; thence southeasterly along the Desolation Creek road to Desolation Guard Station; thence southwesterly along the Indian Rock Road past Indian Rock to Susanville; thence northwesterly along the Middle Fork of the John Day River to its junction with U. S. Highway 395; thence northeasterly along U. S. Highway 395 to Dale, the point of beginning. ARCHERY SEASONS Deer and Elk All archers required to have archery permit in possession while hunting in any archery area. Report card attached to this permit required to be returned to the Game Commission within thirty days after the close of the archery season. Archery permits issued free upon application to Game Commission. All archery hunters required to have deerand/or elk tags in possession as well as archery permits. All deer and/or elk must be taken by means of long bow and barbless broad arrow only. Following minimum weights and sizes are required. Bow: Not less than 40 pounds. Arrow: Not less than 1 ounce (4371/2 grains). Arrowhead: Not less that 1/2 in. wide, and sharp. (Continued on Page Seven)

7 Malheur Reservoir Access Easement obtained in 1952 by Game Commission for this 40-foot road provides public access to Malheur Reservoir. Cattleguard on Carroll Locey property where road starts was constructed by Commission with Dingell - Johnson funds. Malheur County Court graded the road. AUGUST, 1953 Page 7 Derbies (Continued from Page Two) of fish and game can lead eventually to the development of fraudulent practices as a means of winning a prize rather than enjoying the use of a public property under an orderly sustained program. 4. The great social, economic and recreational values inherent in the recreational use of the fish and game resources of the state need no artificial subsidy or bounty-like incentive to provide for maximum use. The spirit of public use of these public properties should be encouraged without the interjection of competition between individuals or communities. PROVIDED FURTHER that in expressing opposition to the principle of competitive exploitation of fish and wildlife by artificial devices such as derbies, this Commission does not ignore the tremendous significance of fishery and wildlife resources to the economy of the state. It fully recognizes this aspect of importance and feels that economically this value is not being damaged by the lack of incentives for increasing human pressure on the resources. This Commission not only recognizes its obligation to the economic aspect of fish and game but feels that through its extensive program directed at maintaining a high level of sustained use of these resources it is meeting this obligation. This one-acre parking area and a 25-foot strip around the edge of the reservoir, as well as the last part of the access road, are covered by easement from the Orchards Water Company. The Powder River Rod and Gun Club cooperated in constructing sanitation facilities. Opening day of trout season this year attracted about 2,000 fishermen. A spot check of 370 anglers showed 984 legal size trout. After being eradicated of trash fish, Malheur Reservoir has been stocked with rainbow trout each year since Hunting Regulations (Continued from Page Six) Open seasons and bag limits for special archery areas are as follows: Canyon Creek Refuge (Grant county): Open season, Sept. 12 through Oct. 20. Bag limit, one deer of either sex and one elk of either sex. Open area: That portion of Canyon Creek Refuge lying north and east of Canyon Creek described as follows: Beginning at the mouth of Sheep Gulch Creek on Canyon Creek at a point approximately 4 miles south of Canyon City; thence south and east along Canyon Creek to the mouth of Middle Fork of Canyon Creek near Wicking Camp; thence north and east along summit; thence north and west along the summit past Pine Creek Mountain to Canyon Mountain; thence west down Sheep Gulch Creek to Canyon Creek, the point of beginning. Hart Mountain (Lake county): Open season, Sept. 12 through Sept. 30. area at Hart Mountain Refuge Headquarters. Open area: Beginning at the old Hart Mountain CCC Camp; thence north, east, and south along posted refuge road to the Refuge Headquarters; thence south and southwesterly along the posted refuge road through the old Post Campground and the Calderwood ranch to the south boundary of the Hart Mountain Refuge; thence west and north along the refuge boundary to the old CCC Camp, the point of beginning. Mt. Emily Game Refuge (Union and Umatilla counties): Open season, Sept. 12 through Sept. 30. Bag limit, one deer of either sex and one elk of either sex. Open area: Beginning at La Grande; thence north along the Mount Emily road to its intersection with the boundary of the Mount Emily (Continued on Page Eight)

8 Page 8 AUGUST, Hunting Regulations (Continued from Page Seven) Game Refuge in Section 7, Township 2 South, Range 38 east; thence following the refuge boundary to the east, north, and west, to its intersection with the posted road in Section 7, Township 1 South, Range 38 East; thence southwesterly along posted road to its junction with U. S. Highway 30 at Kame la; thence southeasterly along U. S. Highway 30 to La Grande, the point of beginning. NOTE: During regular deer and elk seasons this area open to rifle hunting with bag limits as provided under general regulations. White River (Wasco and Hood River counties): Open season, Sept. 12 through Sept. 30. Open area: Those portions of Wasco and Hood River counties described as follows: Beginning at the junction of State Highway 35 and U. S. Highway 26, approximately 3 miles east of Government Camp; thence south and east along U. S. Highway 26 and State Highway 52 to junction with U. S. Highway 197 approximately 3 miles west of Maupin; thence north along U. S. Highway 197 to Dufur; thence westerly along the Fifteen Mile Creek road and posted roads through Deadman Gulch and Bottle Prairie to junction with State Highway 35 in Section 20, Township 2 South, Range 10 East; thence south and west along State Highway 35 to its junction with U. S. Highway 26, the point of beginning. Baker (Baker county): Open season, Sept. 12 through Sept. 30. Bag limit, one deer of either sex and one elk of either sex. Open area: That portion of Baker county described as follows: Beginning at Baker, thence south along Oregon Highway 7 to its junction with the Sumpter Valley road at Salisbury; thence northwesterly along the Sumpter Valley road to Sumpter; thence north along the Fruit Creek road to the summit of the Blue Mountains; thence northerly along the summit to its posted intersection with the Anthony Lakes road; thence east along the Anthony Lakes road to its junction with U. S. Highway 30 at North Powder; thence south along U. S. Highway 30 to Baker, the point of beginning. Tillamook (Tillamouk county): Open season, October 3 through October 16. Open area: Beginning at the junction of the Jordan Creek road with the Wilson River Highway No. 6; thence np the Jordan Creek road to the summit; thence north along the South Fork of the Wilson River road to the Old McNamer Camp on the Wilson River Highway No. 6; thence southwesterly along the Wilson River Highway No. 6 to the Jordan Creek road, the point of beginning. (This area closed to all other hunting.) McDonald Forest (Benton county): Open season, October 24, 25, 31, November 1, 7, and 8. Tag required: unused general deer tag in addition to archery permit. area. Open area: That land north of Corvallis owned by Oregon State College and known as McDonald Forest. Cow Creek Refuge (Douglas county): Open season, September 12 through September 30. Open area: All of the Cow Creek Game Refuge in Douglas county. SMALL GAME PHEASANTS: Area 1: All counties west of the summit of the Cascade Mountains. Open season: Noon, October vember 8. Bag limit: 2 cocks per day during the entire season. Area 2: All counties east of the Cascade Mountains except Jefferson county (see Closures), ty, and Malheur county. Open season: Noon, October vember 15. Bag limit: 3 cocks per day during the entire season. Area 3: Malheur county. 24 through Noand not over 6 the summit of Madras area in Klamath coun- 24 through Noand not over 12 Open season: Noon, October 24 through November 15. Bag limit: 4 cocks per day and not more than 12 during the entire season. Area 4: Klamath county. Open season: Noon Oct. 31 through Nov. 15. Bag Limit: 3 cocks per day and not over 12 during the entire season. No person may take or possess more than 12 pheasants in the aggregate of all seasons. JUVENILE PHEASANT SEASON Area: Designated portions of E. E. Wilson Game Management Area. Open season: September 19, 26, 27; October 3, 4, 10, 11, 17, 18, 25, 31; and November 1, 7, and 8. Bag limit: 2 cock pheasants per day. Restrictions: For juvenile hunters from 14 to 17 years only. All juveniles to be accompanied by licensed adults over 25 years of age. One adult may accompany not to exceed two juveniles. Adults will not bear arms and will be responsible for the conduct of their charges. A maximum of thirty-five juvenile permits will be issued for each designated day in the order in which applications are received at the Portland office of the Game Commission. All juvenile hunters and accompanying adults are required to check in and out of the area. QUAIL: Area 1: Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, Marion, Polk, Benton, Linn, Lane, Douglas, Jackson, Josephine, Coos, and Curry counties except posted state and farmer cooperative game management areas. Open season: Noon, Oct. 24 through Nov. 8. Bag limit: 5 valley, mountain, or bobwhite quail in the aggregate during the season or in possession. Area 2: All counties east of the summit of the Cascade Mountains except Hood River county, Klamath county, Malheur county, and that portion of Wasco county west of U. S. Highway 97. Open season: Noon, October 24 through November 15. Bag limit: 10 valley or mountain quail in the aggregate per day and not over 20 during the entire season or in possession. Area 3: Klamath county. Open season: Oct. 31 through Nov. 15. Bag Limit: 10 valley or mountain quail in the aggregate per day and not over 20 during the entire season or in possession. CHUHAR PARTRIDGE: No open season. HUNGARIAN PARTRIDGE: Open area: All counties east of the summit of the Cascade range except Klamath county. Open season: Noon, Oct. 24 through Nov. 15. Bag limit: 5 per day, 10 during the season or in possession. BLUE AND RUFFED GROUSE: Open area: Entire state. Open season: September 1 through September 10. Bag limit: 3 grouse per day and not over 9 during the entire season or in possession. SAGE GROUSE: Area: Harney county; that portion of Malheur county south of U. S. Highway 20; that part of Lake county lying east of the following line: Beginning at the intersection of the Fort Bidwell-Warner Valley road with the California-Oregon state line; thence north along the Fort Bidwell-Warner Valley road and the Hogback road through Adel and Plush to junction with U. S. Highway 395 north of Abert Lake; thence north along U. S. Highway 395 to its intersection with the east line of Lake county; and the following described portions of Crook, Deschutes, and Lake counties: Beginning at the junction of State Highway 27 with U. S. Highway 20, six miles west of Brothers; thence north along State Highway 27 to junction with the Crooked River road; thence easterly along the Crooked River road through Paulina and Suplee to its intersection with the west line of Grant county; thence south along the west line of Grant and Harney counties to U. S. Highway 20; thence west along U. S. 20 to State Highway 27, the point of beginning. Open season: August 22 through August 27. Bag limit: 2 grouse per day and not over 4 during the entire season, or in possession. SILVER GREY SQUIRRELS: Open season: October 3 to October 20, inclusive, in Benton, Linn, Lane, Douglas, Josephine. Jackson, Coos, and Curry counties. Open season: Entire year in Columbia, Washington, Multnomah, Clackamas, Marion, Yamhill, and Polk counties. Bag limit: 5 in possession. MOURNING DOVE: Open season: Sept. 1 to Sept. 15. Bag limit, 10 a day and in possession. BAND-TAILED PIGEON: Open season: Sept. 1 to Sept. 30. Bag limit, 6 a day and in possession, and not to exceed 24 the season. Game Refuges Open to Hunting Same as last year. Areas Closed to Hunting Trask River and Vincent Creek closures repealed. Other closures same as last year. Fur-Bearing Animals Open season, November 15, 1953 to January 15, 1954, inc. for mink and otter. Open season, November 15, 1953 to February 15, 1954, inc. for muskrat and marten. Closed season entire year for fisher and ringtail cat. Open season entire year for raccoon. Open season for beaver, November 15, 1953 to February 15, 1954, Inc. in essentially the same areas as last year except that Lake and Harney counties will be open November 1 to February 15, and Lincoln county will be closed entire year. Public Shooting Grounds Regulations governing public shooting grounds are essentially the same as last year except location of Malheur shooting area may be changed. Tagging Regulations Same as last year. Arms and Ammunition All regulations are the same as last year except the following: It is unlawful: To use any semi-automatic rifle with a magazine capacity of more than five cartridges, to hunt or kill any deer, elk or antelope. To use any military or full metal-jacketed bullet, in original or altered form, to hunt or kill any deer, elk or antelope. To use a long bow with less than 40 pounds pull and arrow weighing less than one ounce, with a barbless broadhead less than 7/8" wide and sharp, for the taking of any deer, elk or antelope. Oregon State Game Commission Bulletin 1634 S. W. Alder Street P. O. Box 4136 Portland 8, Oregon F STANTON 2127 SW E1ERTHA BEAVERTN HIGHWAY P:';IL AND tr"."or's"' U. S. POSTAGE lc PAID PERMIT NO. 536 PORTLAND 8, ORE.