Welcome to the Sheboygan Lakers Youth Hockey

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1 Welcome to the Sheboygan Lakers Youth Hockey Youth Hockey Handbook 1

2 Table of Contents Pre-Season Important Dates... 5 Concussion Management Program... 6 Players Moving Up 1 Age Division... 7 Objectives of Player Evaluations... 9 Player Selection Criteria for Players and Evaluators Evaluator Cue Card Tryout Schedule Evaluations for Skaters Evaluations for Goaltenders Evaluators for Tryouts Coaching Certification Requirements Coaching Rights & Responsibilities Team Managers Rights & Responsibilities Player & Parent Rights & Responsibilities Grievances Work Hours

3 Youth Hockey CommitteeMembers Dennis Videtic - Youth Hockey Chair Joe Reinhart Referee Coordinator & Registrar Theresa Sandrone- Registrar Adam Jelenc-Grievance Chairman Brian Allen-Tryouts Tim Pilgrim-ACE Coordinator Jill Dogs-Girls Hockey, ADM Program Jack McKinch-High School Hockey Liaison for Youth Hockey Mike Anhalt - Instructional Hockey Representative, Equipment Room Shelley Tuzinkewich Secretary, Team Branding, Scheduling Coordinator for Games/Practices & Preseason Jennifer Carderelle- Liaison to Team Managers, Player Recruitment, Clock training Terry Fox-Tournament Coordinator, WAHA Representative Scott Skaggs-Off-ice Coordinator Karen Skaggs-Website Coordinator Open Positions-Goalie Development, Registrar Important Notes andreminders 1. Coaches need to be USA Hockey certified and complete Lakers Application online. 2. Referees need to be USA Hockey certified. 3. Team Managers need to be USA Hockey registered 4. Team Managers and Coaches need to be safe sport certified. 5. Access to the Rink Area during tryouts will be limited to warming room and entrance areas except for evaluators, on-ice coordinators, referees, and coaches. 6. Parents/ guardians of players will be allowed in the locker rooms before and after the tryout sessions to help with equipment. 7. The tryout format is included in the following pages. 3

4 Basics of Hockey for Players & Parents 4

5 TASK Pre-Season Important Dates TIME RESPONSIBILITY Distribute Youth Hockey Handbook June 15 Youth Hockey Chair Player Applications Submitted July 1 Registrar Coach Applications Submitted July 15 ACE Coordinator Coaches Meeting September 1 ACE Coordinator Select Evaluators September 1 ACE Coordinator Open House for Parents and Players September 13 Youth Hockey/Board of Directors Pre-Season Power Up September 6-22 Youth Hockey Meet with on-ice and off-ice evaluators September 21 ACE Coordinator Tryout Dates Sept 25, 27, 29, and Oct 1 Youth Hockey Finalize Teams/Notify Players October 2 Youth Hockey Grievance Night for Players October 3 Youth Hockey Team Manager Meeting October 13 Team Coordinator/Team Managers Send Team Rosters to WAHA October 30 Team Managers 5

6 Concussion Management Program Sheboygan Lakers follow the general concussion guidelines advised by USA Hockey. The standard of care for current medical practice and the law in most states requires that any athlete with a suspected concussion is immediately removed from play. A concussion is a traumatic brain injury- there is no such thing as a minor brain injury. A player does not have to be knocked-out to have a concussion- less than 10% of players actually lose consciousness. Remember these simple steps: 1. Remove the player immediately from play (training, practice or game) 2. Inform the player s coach/parents 3. Refer the athlete to a qualified health-care professional 4. Medical clearance is required for return to play 5. If the player is unresponsive- call for help & dial 911 6

7 Players Moving Up 1 Age Division In order to provide all skaters the opportunity to skate at the level of hockey that meets their ability, players will be given the opportunity to move up 1 age division (i.e. from Mite to Squirt, Squirt to Peewee, etc). To ensure an adequate number of players on each team at each age division, the Youth Hockey reserves the right to disallow movement between age divisions. The minimum number of remaining players per team to allow movement will be 9 skaters and a goalie. The Youth Hockey reserves the right to disallow any movement based on skill, safety, ability, or the overall impact to the organization. Skill, safety and ability will be based on tryout evaluations. If the player does not participate in tryouts, Youth Hockey will determine if the player can move up an age level. Final determination for allowing the player to skate up an age level will be made by Youth Hockey at the end of tryouts. Youth Hockey will notify the parent or guardian directly at the end of tryouts as to why the player will/will not be allowed to move up. If Youth Hockey allows the player to move up an age level, the player will be placed on the higher age level team. Criteria that must be met to allow a player to move up one age division are as follows: 1. In order to move up an age level the skater must be within one year of that level. For example, a Mite that would like to skate Squirts must have skated one year of Mites and have only one year of Mite eligibility left. The skater must make the A Team or approved by youth hockey. 2. Parents or guardians must notify the Youth Hockey Chairman with a written notice prior to start of tryouts, that the skater/goalie is attempting to move up one age division or has intention of playing at two (2) age divisions. (see 5 below) The written notice can be given to the Chairman of Youth Hockey or placed in the Youth Hockey mailbox in the rink office and addressed to the Chairman. 3. Upon completion of tryouts, said skater must make the A Team or be approved by youth hockey. 4. Upon completion of tryouts, goalies must be rated as the top goalie at the age division they are attempting to move up to. 5. Skater / Goalie must also go through tryouts at their actual age division to be appropriately placed in their age division, if movement to higher age division is not achieved. 6. Skaters may play on two teams at different age divisions (i.e. on both Peewee and on Squirt team) if they meet all the requirements above, and pay registration fees for both teams. The skater/goalie first commitment is their age level appropriate team. The Youth Hockey can elect to waive the above criteria, and allow a player to move up one age division, if deemed necessary to ensure an adequate number of players or teams at an age division. 7

8 Dual Rostering Skaters may be dual rostered at the coaches request and/or discretion of Youth Hockey to provide for back-up players (i.e. goalies) and create flexibility for State Play downs. All WAHA guidelines must be met. A skater does not incur any additional financial burden by being dual rostered. Skaters and Goalies are expected to only practice with their designated team. Exceptions can be made for exceptional circumstances and must have the coach s permission. Designated team means the team Youth Hockey has placed the player on. For dual rostered (for example, paid to play on Squirt A and Peewee B) they may skate practices for both teams. There is no additional charge to the skater. If a player is dual rostered, playing on 2 different teams, the player is required to pay two separate registration fees. Any outside skater that participates in practices must be approved by the coach and pay $250 per season and to be pay in the office before the beginning of the season. Player Evaluations There are two types of evaluations. 1) Evaluations during tryouts for selection on to teams. 2) Evaluations at the end of the season as an end of season reportcard. The tryout evaluations information will then be given to Head Coach, so that they can see what the strengths and weaknesses of those players are after tryouts. The end of season report card will be given to each player by the head coach. 8

9 Objectives of Player Evaluations To provide a fair and impartial assessment of a player's total hockey skills during the skating and scrimmage sessions. To ensure that players have a reasonable opportunity of being selected to a team appropriate to their skill levels as determined during the on-ice evaluations of the current year. To provide uniformity and consistency in the evaluation process, such that player and parent expectations are consistent from year to year as players move through the various levels of the association. To provide feedback in order to develop players. What is being evaluated? Refer to the section on Player Selection criteria for more information on specific skills, tactics and behaviors that are being evaluated. Who will do the evaluations? There are 4 key groups involved in the evaluations: o On-ice evaluators to take players through the session. o Off-ice evaluators who will be responsible to evaluate every player on the ice during the time allotted. o The Head Coach of the team makes the decision on the final team selections (he/she can move 3 players up or down). o Youth Hockey who will be responsible for tracking evaluations, contacting parents and players and scheduling sessions. What should my player wear to the evaluation? Full equipment is always mandatory. Thisincludes: Protective cup, Shin pads, Hockey pants, Shoulder pads, Elbow pads, Skates, Hockey gloves, Hockey stick, Helmet and full shield, Mouth guard. Players will be assigned a piney upon their arrival at the rink. The evaluators will only know the players piney number. How are the players notified of their standing within the process? Final teams will be posted on the Sheboygan Lakers website as the first method of communication.. After tryouts players will be contacted by the head coach of their designated team. The coach will outline: Practice schedule, Game schedule, Introduction of other coaches and setting of first meeting with parents and players. 9

10 What happens after the evaluationsessions? Players ranked from 1-10 will be posted on Team #1. Players ranked from will be posted on Team #2. Players ranked from will be posted on Team #3. Goalies will be posted on the designated team. Two goalies will be placed on B or C team depending on the number of goalies that tryout. The head coach is permitted to make the final recommendation for the team. Head Coaches are required to be at all tryouts for their age division. The A Team Head Coach will be selected prior to the start of the final tryout. The B Team Head Coach will be identified once the A Team is selected. The Head Coach is required to submit their player evaluation forms to Youth Hockey before team selection. Youth Hockey Committee is permitted to finalize the teams. Youth Hockey will determine how many teams there will be for each age division. The top 5 players at the A-level Squirt, Peewee, and Bantam will not need to participate in the final tryout on Saturday. The players that did not make the A-level tryout will not be required to tryout at the B-level. These top 5 players will automatically be placed on the designated team. The purpose for this is to allow players to be more competitive with players at their level during the final tryout. Upon the completion of evaluations, players will be contacted by the head coach of their designated team. The coach will outline: Practice schedule Game schedule Introduction of other coaches Setting of first meeting with parents and players The head coach is permitted to shift 3 players from a lower team immediately after tryouts if they feel a player is more appropriately suited for their team. What happens if I cannot make it to tryouts? If for any reason an athlete is absent from a tryout session, it is the parent s or player's responsibility to notify a Youth Hockey Member as to the age division the athlete is trying out at. Please give a minimum 24-hour notice. If a player misses all of the tryouts then the player will be placed on the lowest level team. Are tryouts open to a parent or guardian for watching their skater? Parent or guardian is limited to session 1 only. Session 2 and session 3 are closed to all parents and guardians. Parent or guardian is allowed to assist player to get dressed/undressed in the locker room only. Session 2 and session 3 are closed to parents and guardians to help players focus during drills and allow coaches and evaluators to focus on evaluations. Parents are permitted to wait in the concessions area or warming room area only. Coaches are permitted to sit in the bleacher area. 10

11 Player Selection Criteria for Players and Evaluators The following is a reference that will be provided to evaluators prior to the player selection process. An age specific skill list can be found on the following pages. Skating Acceleration, speed, mobility, agility, balance, stride, crossovers, pivots, acceleration out of turns, quick feet, controlled skating, change of pace. o Can the players perform the basic forward and backward stride? o Are the players knees well bent with the back slightly forward and the head up, or is the player hunched over, bending at the waist with little knee bend? o Good skaters will use long strides with a complete recovery of the stride leg before striding with the other leg. Their strides will look very smooth and appear not to require much effort to move around the ice? o Does the player look smooth when they skate or do they appear off balance? o Can the player turn in both directions with little trouble or do they struggle to turn in one or both directions? o Can the player stop in both directions? Younger players will often have trouble stopping in one direction? o Can the player keep up with the play or do they struggle to stay with the other players on the ice? Passing o Passing, receiving, passing choices, on backhand, unselfish with the puck, presents a good target, receives and retains with control, touch passing. o Can the player pass the puck to its intended target with minimaleffort? o Can the player make an accurate pass to a moving target? o Can the player receive a pass on their backhand or do they tend to shift their body to receive the pass on the forehand? o Can the player pass the puck off of the backhand with some speed and accuracy? o Does the player call for the puck vs. banging their stick on the ice or saying nothing at all? o Does the player passing the puck make eye contact with the intended receiver or do they just pass the puck blindly? o Can the player execute a saucer pass over sticks and other obstacles? o Can the player pass the puck off of the boards to another player? Puck Control o Head up, smooth and quiet, good hands, protection, in small spaces, in traffic. o Does the player have the basic skills to execute a forehand pass? o When the player passes the puck do they slap at it or is the motion smooth with the player following through to the intended target? o Does the player appear to be comfortable handling the puck while skating or do they appear to fight the puck and have trouble skating with some speed while handling it? o Can the player keep his/her head up while carrying the puck? o Can they execute dekes and fakes with the puck? o Can't they stop quickly or change directions while handling thepuck? o Can the player continue to handle the puck while in traffic and under pressure? o Does the player get pushed or checked off the puck easily? 11

12 Shooting Power, accuracy, quick release, can shoot in motion, goal scorer, rebound control, variety of shots. o Can the player execute the technique of a wrist shot and backhand? o Does the player follow through to the target on all shots? o Can the player raise the puck? o Is the puck shot with some velocity? o Does the puck sit flat in the air or does itwobble? o Can the player execute a one-time shot? o Is the player accurate whenshooting? Positional Play Ability to see the play developing both offensively and defensively and moves to support, judgment, anticipation, understands systems, disciplined. o Does the player seem to understand where he/she are to play on the ice? o Do they support the puck in defensive and offensive situations? o Does the player show patience or do they tend to panic when pressured? o Do they protect the mid lane and force opposing players inside out? o Can the player angle another player off of the puck? o Does the player force the play or do they wait too long? Checking Concept of angling, good body position with balance and control, defensive side position, aggressive checker, strength, takingchecks. o Can the player execute basic stick and body checks? o Does the player check properly with their hands down or do they get their arms up to give a check? o Can the player receive a check properly, not turning their back and staying close to the boards? o Can the player check and opposing player and pin them on the boards? o Does the player shy away from other players? 12

13 Evaluator Cue Card Skating technique, quickness & speed Forward and Backward Turn both directions Stop both directions Are they in a good position for stability and strength Passing technique, control, vision Forehand and Backhand To moving and stationary target Vision do they take a look and select bestoption Advanced board passes, chips, saucer passes Puck Control technique, open ice, confinedspace Open carry with speed Execute dekes and fakes on the 1 on 1 Can they handle the puck in traffic and tight space Ability to maintain control while beingchecked Shooting technique, accuracy, velocity Forehand and backhand Wrist shot, snap shot, slap shot Velocity Accuracy Shot Selection do they select the best shot for the opportunity? Game Understanding Principles of Offence and Defence Player understands positional play Player supports the puck on the defensive and offensive side of puck Player communicates with teammates Player has the ability to read and react. 13

14 Tryout Sessions 1st SESSION 2nd SESSION Part 1: 25 minutes of skills. Individual skaters will do skill drills as directed by the on ice coordinator and earn a score for each drill. Goalies will do modified skills. Part 2: 50 minutes of scrimmage 5 on 5. All skaters and goalies will earn scores for hustle and skill based on their scrimmage skills for this session. These scores will be used to rank the players for the next session. Part 1: 25 minutes of skills. Individual skaters will do skill drills as directed by the on ice coordinator and earn a score for each drill. Goalies will do modified skills. Part 2: 50 minutes of games & scrimmage 5 on 5. All skaters and goalies will earn scores for hustle and skill based on their scrimmage skills for this session. These scores will be used to rank the players for the next session. A Team SESSION After the first two sessions, Youth Hockey will rank the skaters based on the averages of all scores per skater. The top skaters (number of skaters projected to be put on the team plus 5) will then be notified by posting in the rink and on the website. These skaters will participate in the A Team tryout. All others will participate in the B Team tryout session to determine the B and C teams. Part 1: 60 minutes of scrimmage 5 on 5. All skaters and goalies will earn scores for hustle and skill based on their scrimmage skills for this session. These scores will be used to rank the players for the next session. B Team SESSION After the first two sessions, Youth Hockey will rank the skaters based on the averages of all scores per skater. The top skaters (number of skaters projected to be put on the team plus 5) will then be notified by posting in the rink and on the website. These skaters participate in the A Team tryout. All others will participate in the B Team tryout session to determine B and C team. Part 1: 60 minutes of scrimmage 5 on 5. All skaters and goalies will earn scores for hustle and skill based on their scrimmage skills for this session. These scores will be used to rank the players for the next session. 14

15 Tryout Schedule Goalies September 25 Sunday Squirt 11:00-12:30pm Peewee & Bantam 12:45-2:15pm Tryouts 1&2: Players & Goalies September 27 September 29 Tuesday Thursday Squirt Peewee Bantam Squirt Peewee Bantam 5:30pm - 6:45pm 7:00pm - 8:15pm 8:30pm - 9:45pm 5:30pm - 6:45pm 7:00pm - 8:15pm 8:30pm - 9:45pm Session 1 Session 1 Session 1 Session 2 Session 2 Session 2 Final Tryouts: Players & Goalies October 1 Saturday Squirt Squirt Peewee Peewee Bantam Bantam 12:00pm - 1:00pm 1:15pm - 2:15pm 2:30pm - 3:30pm 3:45pm - 4:45pm 5:00pm - 6:00pm 6:15pm - 7:15pm A Team B Team A Team B Team A Team B Team Grievance Night October 3 Monday 6:30pm-7:30pm 15

16 Evaluations for Skaters Evaluations for Squirts age 7-10 (Participative, Instructional, FUNdamentalStage) Generally during this stage of development playerswill: Acquire the physical, cognitive and social skills necessary for proficiency in games Start to understand the idea, function and arbitrary nature of rules within the games Improve their perceptual motor skills, such as hand eye coordination Learn to interact with peers Start formulating a self-concept Develop a system of conscience morality and value judgments. Note: Each station will be completed throughout the 25 minutes. Each station will be evaluated after each station is complete then the next station will start and be evaluated. For the best results 3 evaluators should be assigned to evaluate. This ensures continuity and consistency on the evaluation of a particularskill. Ice Session 1 General Objective: Skating and Puck Control Skill Evaluation Specific Skills Being Evaluated: Forward Skating, Backward Skating, Stationary Passing, Pass Receiving, Skating with Puck & Stopping. Overview Stations 1. Forwards and Backward Skating 25 Minutes 2. Skating with Puck 8 minutes per station 3. Passing and Receiving - Stationary Station 1 Forward and Backward Striding - down and back Station 2 Skating with the Puck forward - down and back Station 3 Stationary Passing and Receiving with Coaches Scrimmage 1. On-Ice Coordinator 50 Minutes 2. Divide players up into two teams *Goalies only participate in shooting drills & scrimmage. 16

17 Ice Session 2 General Objective: Skating and Puck Control Skill Evaluation Specific Skills Being Evaluated: Tight Turns, Agility/Acceleration with puck Passing and Pass Receiving Skating with the Puck Overview 3 Stations 1. Tight Turns, crossover 25 Minutes 2. Agility Skate with puck 8 minutes per station 3. Passing and Receiving in motion Station 1: Forward skating without a puck, tight turns around the pylons Station 2: Skating with the Puck forward - around the pylons, full 360 around last pylon Station 3: Passing and Receiving in motion with Coaches - finish with shot Games with Purpose Dodge the Puck / Asteroids 10 minutes Asteroids 5 or 6 players at a time - players attempt to skate with the puck from one end to the other. Coaches are lined up on either side of the ice shooting pucks (along the ice) at the players trying to knock the puck off of their sticks. Scrimmage 1. On-Ice Coordinator 40 Minutes 2. Divide players up into two teams Ice Session 3 Overview Scrimmage 1. On-Ice Coordinator 60 Minutes 2. Divide players up into two teams *Goalies only participate in shooting drills & scrimmage. 17

18 Evaluations for Peewee and Bantam age (TRANSITIONAL DEVELOPMENTAL STAGE) Generally during this stage of development playerswill: Develop the social, cognitive, language and motor skills necessary for individual and group participation Adapt to the physical and physiological changes affecting their body Establish senses of independence and identification Acquire the moral concepts, values and attitudes that make it possible to relate meaningfully to society Participate in competitive sport. Note that intense competition is not recommended until the latter part of this age group. Ice Session 1 Overview 4 Stations 1. Forward Skating 20 Minutes 2. Stops and starts 5 minutes per station 3. Skating with a puck 4. Shooting in motion Station 1: Stop at each pylon, accelerate to the next pylon and stop. Feet should always face the far end when stopping Station 2: Forward skating around the circles - focus should be on players ability to cross over both ways and maintain speed and control G Station 1& 2 Station 3 & 4 x x x x x x x Station 3: Forward skating with the puck, player performs tight turns around the pylons. Evaluators should be watching for acceleration out of the turn and ability to control the puck on the forehand and backhand. Station 4: 3 players at a time out of the corner with a puck. Players mill around center ice until coach s whistle - on whistle players fill lane and go in for shot. Same whistle starts 3 new players out of the corner x x x 18

19 Scrimmage 1. On-Ice Coordinator 55 Minutes 2.Divide players up into two teams Specific Skills Being EvaluatedTight Turns, Agility/Acceleration with puck Passing and Pass Receiving Skating with Puck Ice Session 2 Overview Stations 1. Transition skating, crossovers 20 Minutes 2. Agility Skate with puck 5 minutes per station 3. Passing and Receiving in motion Scrimmage 1. On-Ice Coordinator 55 Minutes 2.Divide players up into two teams Ice Session 3 Overview on1 on 2 Down low Scrimmage 1. On-Ice Coordinator 60 Minutes 2. Divide players up into two teams Station 1: Player skates forward to the pylon with a puck, pivots and skates backward to next pylon, open pivot and skate forward etc. Repeat both directions, each player should get at least 1 opportunity each way Station 2: Backward skating around the circles with a puck- focus should be on players ability to cross over both ways and maintain speed and control Station 3: Forward skating with the puck, player performs a pass while pivoting around the pylons. Player skates backward without puck and receives pass back after pivoting to forward around pylon. Evaluators should ^j.úë¼r pi o ßúùÔVîʵ à ì } Œ úò/õîor- Ù f\19&êk x š EûN öoùñûÿnãiâp4 œh9 r Ñ ÜPÈ Ê.ê µ19jøý~ - ]'Eœ%XëHoÐcp?#æÄ ÕEr\k «ˆ ßí _#ç ak A â»á* ïàcö JûX F öy " KˆÁëú Lð'ÆÝ ÐJáÒËäÅ eáù±?ö 19

20 *Goalies only participate in shooting drills & scrimmage. Evaluations for Goaltenders Evaluations for Goaltenders- Squirts age 7-10 (Participative, Instructional, FUNdamentalStage) Overview The evaluation of goaltenders requires specific attention outside of the regular player evaluation sessions. Associations are encouraged to include the goaltenders in all sessions but also book a minimum of 3 sessions for goaltender specific evaluations. In the development of the goaltender the Hockey Canada goaltender skills manual identifies the basic progression of skills: 1. Basic Skating Skill 2. Position-Specific movement skills 3. Positional/Save movement skills 4. Rebound Control/Recovery/Tactical 5. Transitional Play 6. Advanced Positioning Beginner Goaltenders DRILL A Step Outs (straight) 1. Have each goalie start at one of theposts 2. On the coach s Go, G s will scull out to a top-of-the-crease depth, stop and wait 3. On the next Go, G s will scull back to the goal line, stop and wait 4. Repeat this 10 times 5. G s must stay in their stance throughout the drill 6. Make sure the upper body and stick remain stable 7. Make sure G s alternate starting and stopping feet to increase efficiency on both sides ä L 20

21 DRILL B Step Outs (angle) 1. This drill is identical to the first drill except G s will step out on angles 2. Make sure G s move out on the same angle each time as indicated by the numbers 3. This is a good drill for edge control as it forces G s to have slight body rotations and increases the size of the initial c-cuts 4. Repeat this 5 times to each side µ D Ú - : Ó DRILL C Forward/Backward Adjustment/Starts and Stops 1. G s start on the goal line 2. On the coach s Go, G s scull forward until the coach calls Stop 3. G s wait for the next Go, then, scull forward again until the next Stop 4. This should continue all the way to the blue line 5. Repeat this drill using backward sculling from the blue line back to the goal line 6. G s must alternate starting and stopping feet every time 7. Coach should adjust the size of each forward adjustment as indicated in the diagram œ [ Drill D Angle Work 1. Pucks are placed in the center circle 2. Five pylons are placed along the blue line as indicated 3. The player skates towards the goalie s zone and, then, breaks quickly towards one cone 4. Once around the cone, the player drives at the net and releases a shot 5. G starts in the middle of the goal line and responds out and on angle to face the firstattacker 6. For the next attacker, G starts at the top of the crease and responds before returning back to the goal line for the next two-shot sequence 21

22 y DRILL E - Stationary Adjustments 1. Position a shooter below each face off dot and in the mid slot. 2. The goaltender should work from a single post/three-shotsequence. 3. With the goalie starting on their left post, the coach will signal to begin and the goalie will step out to face a shot from X1 (compacting theirstance). 4. The goalie will return to the same-side post and wait for the next command this time moving into position to face the slot shot. 5. Repeat sequence to face X3. 6. Reverse the drill moving in the opposite direction using the opposite post. 7. Make sure all shooters allow the goalie to move out, set and then adjust their stance appropriately. â w a ¹ #Òb ± DRILL F Zone Drill 1. Paint the ice as shown, with both lines andnumbers. 2. Make sure that both your goalie and the shooters understand the numberingsystem. 3. Each shooter positions themselves in a zone with a puck. 4. When ready, the coach will call a zone. The goaltender moves from a post position into a position to face the called shot. When set the goalie should adjust their stance accordingly. 5. In zones 3 and 5, the goalie will compact their stance, in zones 1 and 2, the goalie will maintain a basic stance and in zone 4 the goalie will widen their stance. 6. Add a player in front of the net for deflections and rebounds 22

23 û N µ 1 c Evaluations for Peewee, Bantam Goaltenders-age DRILL A Step Outs (straight) 8. Have each goalie start at one of theposts 9. On the coach s Go, G s will scull out to a top-of-the-crease depth, stop and wait 10. On the next Go, G s will scull back to the goal line, stop and wait 11. Repeat this 10 times 12. G s must stay in their stance throughout the drill 13. Make sure the upper body and stick remain stable 14. Make sure G s alternate starting and stopping feet to increase efficiency on both sides Ë Š DRILL B Step Outs (angle) 5. This drill is identical to the first drill except G s will step out on angles 6. Make sure G s move out on the same angle each time as indicated by the numbers 7. This is a good drill for edge control as it forces G s to have slight body rotations and increases the size of the initial c-cuts 8. Repeat this 5 times to each side 23

24 ò é DRILL C Forward/Backward Adjustment/Starts and Stops 1. G s start on the goal line 2. On the coach s Go, G s scull forward until the coach calls Stop 3. G s wait for the next Go, then, scull forward again until the next Stop 4. This should continue all the way to the blue line 5. Repeat this drill using backward sculling from the blue line back to the goal line 6. G s must alternate starting and stopping feet every time 7. Coach should adjust the size of each forward adjustment as indicated in the diagram " % DRILL D Positional Assessment 1. X1 drives down the boards and around the pylon to release the shot 2. X2 meanwhile mirrors the movement on the other side without a puck 3. As X2 comes around the cone, X2 hustles back out around the middle pylon and drives around it for a second shot on net 4. After taking the shot X2 can stay high or drive down the slot 5. X1 buys time and then drives around the opposite side pylon and releases the 3 rd shot. 24

25 à Drill E Save Assessment and ReboundControl 1. Use the slot position to assess limb saves pad extensions, glove and blocker saves 2. Use the face off dot positions to evaluate body usage and savecompactness 3. Use both positions to assess stick usage Drill F Rebound Control, Positioning andmovement Š Ü ± š g Phases: phases the first starts with the pucks on the line furthest away from the net (Top of the circles), second phase move the pucks into the dots and the third phase to the bottom of the circles 2. In all phases, the first shot comes after G steps out from near side post. 2 nd comes after shuffle to middle. 3 rd shot comes after goalie moves back to mid goal and then steps back out to face X3. 3. Shot should not be released until the goalie has set. 25

26 Drill G Movement Post Play Ÿ 10 Xs/side 5 Xs/side 10 Xs/side Xs A Lateral Drives to the Post Goalie starts in the middle of the crease and drives to one post, drives back to mid net and then drives to the opposite post B Near Side Step outs with Goal line Drive Goalie starts on glove side post and steps out to face the same side dot. Goalie returns to the same post, once post side coverage is set goalie can drive across to the opposite post and repeat C Paddle Down Drives same as A except goalie should drive with paddledown. Goalie Guidelines At the Peewee level and above there will be a limit of 2 goalies per team. After registration, if there are more than 2 goalies per team in age division (peewee and above), all parents will be contacted informing them that goalies not making the cut will automatically be placed as a skater on the bottom skill level team. As an option, the athlete can try out as a skater. Notification of desire to have athlete try out as a skater rather than a goalie must be made to Youth Hockey, prior to the beginning of tryouts. Goalies will be evaluated based on scrimmages, and separate goalie tryout night. Based on scores from each session, goalies will be ranked top to bottom Goalies should attend the three skater sessions and the goalie only time. Goalies will be required to participate in the skater sessions as a goalie. Goalies must have one evaluation from a skater tryout session, focusing on the scrimmage portion. Goalies are required to be at the goalie only session. Any issues should be addressed with Youth Hockey. When there appears to be multiple goalies placed on each team of the age level, Youth Hockey will determine if a goalie should skate out for one of the first two sessions to be evaluated as a skater for team placement. This is required in cases where a goalie could be skating out when not suited as a goalie for a game. If the number of goalies exceeds the number of teams, the A team coach has the option of selecting a second goalie. If there are extra goalies after the A team has been determined, the B team coach has the option of selecting a second goalie (unless there are 2 extra goalies in 24

27 which case the C team would have the next 2 ranked goalies). In the case where there is no coach to select goalies they will be placed on teams according to the rankings and the groupings from the evaluators. Coach may use 1 of 3 player selections for the second goalie. Coach must attend goalie tryout night, plus 2 of 3 sessions to reserve the right to select a goalie. During the regular season Girls, Peewees and Bantam goalies playing time is at the discretion of the coach. At Squirt level goalies are to get equal number of games in net. When not playing in net, alternate Squirt/Girls goalie will skate. For Peewee and Bantams, goalies not playing in net will have the option of dressing as alternate goalie or as a skater. For each game not in net that a goalie misses (unexcused), that goalie will lose 1 game in net. This stipulation is put in place to eliminate goalies simply skipping games when they are not playing in net. It is important to encourage development of skating and overall hockeyskills For State play downs and State Tournament, the coach will reserve the right to choose the starting goalie based on demonstrated skills and abilities. The equal number of game restrictions will not be enforced for these tournaments. Practices: Goalies are expected to only practice with their designated team. Exceptions can be made for exceptional circumstances and must have the coach s permission. Designated team means the team Youth Hockey has placed the player on. For dual rostered (for example, paid to play on Squirt A and Peewee B) they may skate practices for both teams. There is no additional charge to the player. Games: Goalies are expected to only play for their designated team, unless a need is determined. Both teams coaches (coach asking for a goalie from a different team and coach that goalie is coming from) should agree on which goalies are at the appropriate level to play for the other team. Coaches are expected to give equal opportunity to skaters that both coaches have determined meet the skill level required. If at any time, this is not seen as fair, please follow the grievance policy setup in this booklet or contact Youth Hockey. There is no additional charge to the goalie. EVALUATION FORMS On the following pages there are several examples of evaluation forms that your association can utilize. The purpose of these samples is to provide associations with a framework of how the information on each player can be gathered and synthesized to provide the results that best meet your objectives. There are a couple of items ofnote: 1. All forms use a 1-5 scale (1 = POOR, 2 = BELOW AVERAGE, 3 = AVERAGE, 4 = ABOVE AVERAGE, 5 = OUTSTANDING). The 1-5 scale has several purposes. 2. The 1-5 scale should be used fully within each session. Evaluators must be trained that within each session the top player in that session is a 5 and the bottom player is a 1 for any particular skill or tactic. The goal of these sessions is to be able to rank the players on the ice from top to bottom. 25

28 1. GOALTENDERS INDIVIDUAL SKILLS ADVANCED EVALUATIONFORM Player s Name: Position: 1 = Poor 2 = Below Average 3 = Average 4 = Above Average 5 = Outstanding Physical Characteristics Balance Retains ready position after blockingshots Holds ready position in movement Recovery (regains position after leaving thenet) Mobility: Skating ability Remains on feet Moves with speed & in control in readyposition Reacts well to puck movement in zone Ability to recover from knees, side Quickness: Fitness Level Technical Characteristics Reacts well to quick shots Effective in close Relaxative movements and reactiontime Physically fit Not prone to injury Low Shots Use of skates Use of Stick Rebound control: off stick off pads Ability to butterfly at appropriate time Ability to maintain balance High Shots Quickness of gloves: blocker catcher Position: blocker catcher Rebound control: blocker catcher chest Use of Stick Passing/clearing Poke check Situational Tactic Characteristics Positioning & Angles Knows position at all times Assumes neutral position at top edge ofcrease Positions self properly prior toshot Ability to orient self instantly Lines up properly on puck Knowledge of shooter s options Face-Offs: Looks for potential shooter Position for left and center Deflections & Screen Shots Ability to locate potential shooters Position with respect to potentialdeflectors Works hard to find puck Use of body Reaction to change of direction Control of rebounds Play at Posts Position self properly (play behind net,corner) Lateral mobility Use of stick to decrease scoringopportunities Ability to challenge slot pass

29 1= Poor 2 = Below Average 3 = Average 4 = Above Average 5 = Outstanding Mental Characteristics Concentration Alert at all times Follows puck at all times Maintains conc. despite bad plays/earlygoals Anticipation Understands offensive team playoptions Able to pick up open man Able to read shooter Finds puck in scramble Consistency Able to make key saves Able to perform in pressuresituations Confidence Displays an in charge attitude Positive mental attitude at alltimes Desire Size of heart Constant desire to excel in allsituations Constant work ethic in practices Never gives up Discipline Controls temper On time and organized Communication Coachability Can this goaltender play? YES NO MAYBE Would you want this goaltender on yourteam? YES NO MAYBE Completed by: Date: 27

30 COACH S-DETAILED PLAYER EVALUATION FORFORWARDS/DEFENSEMEN (Complete during Saturday Tryout) Player s Name: Skating Comments Passing Comments Puckhandling Comments Shooting Comments Checking Skills Comments Thinking Skills Comments 1 vs 1 Offensive Comments 1 vs 1 Defensive Comments Face-Offs Comments Position: 1 = Poor 2 = Below Average 3 = Average 4 = Above Average 5 = Outstanding Acceleration, speed, mobility, agility, balance, stride, crossovers, pivots, acceleration out of turns, quick feet, controlled skating, change of pace Passing, receiving, passing choices, on backhand, unselfish with the puck, presents a good target, receives and retains with control, touch passing Head ups, smooth and quiet, good hands, protection, in small spaces, in traffic Power, accuracy, quick release, can shoot in motion, goal scorer, rebounder, variety of shots Concept of angling, good body position with balance and control, defensive side position, aggressive checker, strength, taking checks Ability to see the play developing both offensively and defensively and moves to support, judgment, anticipation, understands systems, disciplined Deception, change of pace, creativity, determination, going to the net Gap control, angling, finishing checks, positioning, play at offensive blue line, play at defensive blue line, front of the net, in smallspaces Win-lose draw, ability to tie up, takes charge, breaks through picks, know responsibilities Completed by: Date: 28

31 COACH S-DETAILED PLAYER EVALUATION FORFORWARDS/DEFENSEMEN (Complete during Saturday Tryout) Player s Name: Position: 1 = Poor 2 = Below Average 3 = Average 4 = Above Average 5 = Outstanding Fitness Level Physically fit, physically tough, not prone toinjuries Determination/Dr ive/intensity/wor Constant desire to excel in all situations, constant work ethic in practices and games, never gives up, fire in his eyes. th Ethic Coachability Listens to instructions and executes to the best of his ability, takes tips and advice, asks questions, admits errors, show that he wants to learn Concentration Ability to remain focused on the task at hand, not distracted by fans, referees, external circumstances Mental Not easily discouraged, rebounds from errors, performs well under pressure Toughness Discipline Controls temper, follows team rules, sticks to game plan Positive Team Unselfish, puts team before self, remains positive, will accept role. Player Leadership Leads by example, encourages others, respected byteammates éæ»þ?~ Completed by: Date: 29

32 COACH S-DETAILED PLAYER EVALUATION FORFORWARDS/DEFENSEMEN (Complete during Saturday Tryout) Detailed Player Evaluation Template Evaluator Session # 1 = Poor 2 = Below Average 3 = Average 4 = Above Average 5 = Outstanding # Pos Player Name G G G D D D D D D D D F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F Rank 1,2,3,4,5 Comments 30

33 EVALUATOR- PLAYER EVALUATION FORFORWARDS/DEFENSEMEN & GOALIES Evaluator Session # 1 = Poor 2 = Below Average 3 = Average 4 = Above Average 5 = Outstanding Evaluator Skills Scrimmage Skills Scrimmage Skills Scrimmage Skills Scrimmage Number Name Hustle Skills Hustle Skills Hustle Skills Hustle Skills (1-5) (1-5) (1-5) (1-5) (1-5) (1-5) (1-5) (1-5) (1-5) (1-5) (1-5) (1-5) Total Ranked Score 31

34 Evaluators for Tryouts Youth Hockey will try to limit evaluators to one session per age level, dependent on the number of approved evaluators available. Two to three outside" evaluators will be recruited and approved per age group by Youth Hockey. Every effort will be made to have evaluators that do not have players in the organization. Evaluators may not have a child competing at the age division they are evaluating or have any knownbias. Two previous year coaches without players at the age division. An evaluator must possess an adequate understanding of hockey skills and the physical requirements needed to compete. An evaluator must pledge impartiality and base all decisions on guidelines provided by Youth Hockey. An evaluator may be disqualified if absent for more than one tryout session. Evaluators will be directed by Youth Hockey and shall receive instruction from the Youth Hockey, prior to tryouts on the tryout and selection format. Upon successful completion of the tryout process, evaluators will receive work hour credits, hockey league credits, or a skate pass. Discrimination is not allowed. Evaluators will be asked to participate in the final team selection process, immediately following the final days tryout session. Evaluators that do not have skaters in any Lakers program are eligible for a skater punch card. Tryout Analysis-Mites, Squirts, Peewees and Bantams Mites will not have formal tryouts. Skaters will be divided into teams by Mite coaches. There will not be a traditional A or B team. Any concerns after team placement should be directed to Youth Hockey. If for any reason an athlete is absent from tryouts, it is the parent s or player's responsibility to notify a Youth Hockey Member. Please give24-hour notice. Should a player arrive late for a session, the player must notify the coordinator upon his/her arrival. This will allow for accuracy in maintaining attendance records. A skater must make one of the first two sessions in order to be included in the A Team tryout session. It is recommended that everyone attend all the tryout sessions that are applicable. Players will be notified of all dates and times for equipment rental and tryout sessions, team evaluation procedures, and all other pertinent data. It is the player's responsibility to be fully dressed 15 minutes before the first tryout session, 10 minutes before the remaining sessions. This assures adequate time for taking attendance, instruction, and issuing identification numbers. No players or spectators will be allowed in the rink area along the glass, except for access to the locker rooms. Players and parents may be in the concession area. Parent or guardian is allowed to be in the rink for session 1 only. Session 2 and session 3 are closed to all parents and guardians. Parent or guardian is allowed to assist player get dressed/undressed in the locker room only. Session 2 and session 3 are closed to parents and guardians to help players focus during 32

35 drills and allow coaches to and evaluators to focus on evaluations. Each player will be issued an identification number. This number will assist the evaluators in associating individuals with performance data obtained during the tryout sessions. The Youth Hockey will randomly assignidentification numbers to eachplayer. At all levels, players wishing to tryout as a goalie must declare their intentions to the Youth Hockey prior to the start of tryouts. Players may request to be placed on the lowest skill level team at an age division. Requests shall be made to the Youth Hockey Chairman in writing any time before the second tryout session. When there are anticipated to be too many skaters at an age level to evaluate appropriately in a session, Youth Hockey may divide the age level and hold multiple sessions. For example, Youth Hockey anticipates 45 squirt skaters. This is a large number of skaters that makes a difficult job for the evaluators to give each skater the appropriate attention. Youth Hockey will split the first two sessions and have a Squirt 1 for last names starting with A-M and a Squirt 1 for last names starting with N-Z. Then therewill be a Squirt 2 for last names starting with A-M and a Squirt 2 for last names starting with N-Z. Based on the evaluator scores the top skaters will be selected to the A Team tryout and the rest will participate in the B Team tryout. Any skater that has made the A Team tryout session and does not wish to be considered for the A team; has until one hour before the A Team session to contact Youth Hockey, in writing, to refuse the placement and be placed on the B Team. If there are not enough skaters to make three teams (A, B, C) then a B Team tryout session will not be required. All skaters not making the A Team tryout will be placed on the B Team. The B team will not be posted until all teams are determined and all will be postedtogether. The skaters that participate in the A team tryout and are not placed on the A Team will automatically be placed on the B team and do not need to skate in the B Team session. Upon completion of the B Team practice (if needed), Youth Hockey will average allof the skater scores and form the B and C (if applicable) teams. Any player not abiding by the code of conduct during tryouts may be placed on a lower team. The evaluators will use a form provided by the Youth Hockey to rank the skaters. Each skater will be given a score of 1 (poor) 5(excellent) for each drill. Each skater will also get a skill and hustle score, using the same 1-5 scale, for the scrimmage. The head coach will have the option to review the last 3 players placed on a team based on the rankings and request replacement of any of those players with a different player. This request shall be made to the Youth Hockey after tryouts are complete, but before final team rosters are posted. The head coach must be present at 2 of 3 tryout sessions to retain the right to make this request. The coach must provide adequate justification for making the request. Therequest will be reviewed by Youth Hockey and the committee will vote on whether or not to grant the coaches request. If no coach for a team has been selected when teams are formed, players will be placed on teams based on rankings from tryoutsessions. 33

36 All documented information will be presented to and held by the Youth Hockey and available for review in the event of a grievance. On minor penalties, skaters will sit the remainder of that shift. For major penalties, including checking from behind and kicking, players will be penalized 20% of the total possible score any skater can receive. For every 3 minor penalties accumulated in a session, a player will be penalized 5% of the total possible score for that session. Based on evaluation scores, input by evaluators and coaches evaluations, skaters without adequate skills to compete at their age division may be asked to skate in one of the in-house programs if available. (First Ice, Mitey Mites, In-House League). This decision will be made prior to posting of teams. All scrimmages will use USA Hockey rules for that age level and use 1:30 shifts. Goalies will rotate after twoshifts. Coordinators-On-Ice & Off-Ice Youth Hockey is the central contact point. They will answer questions from parents, direct the coaches, and has overall responsibility for the assigned age division. There will be two bench assistants during the scrimmage session tryouts for each age division. Those aiding in the tryout sessions will be appointed by the Youth Hockey. There must be a coordinator or referee on the ice at any given time during the tryout session. Youth Hockey members are the only persons responsible for communicating with evaluators. Coaches or parents should direct any questions or concerns to a member of Youth Hockey, not the evaluators. The check-in table coordinator or Youth Hockey will take attendance and convey this information to the evaluators prior to the start of each session. To the best of their ability, the Youth Hockey will attempt to find coordinators without children competing at that level. Upon successful completion of the tryout process, coordinators will receive work hour credits. A member of the Youth Hockey will be present at all times to handle any situation not covered above. Referees are on the ice for all scrimmage sessions. Pre-Season Power Up Preseason power up sessions will be setup to help players prepare for the upcoming youth hockey tryouts as well as prepare for the upcoming season. Coaches will be selected to help coordinate on-ice and off-ice activities. Players are encouraged to attend the sessions. At each session coaches will receive a sheet to evaluate the strengths of each player. 34

37 End of Season Report Card Evaluations On the following page is for coaches to complete on players for an end of season evaluation and share with the ACE Coordinator and Player/Parent. An example is below. Player Name: Patrick Kane Recommendation from Coach: (Division A, B or C) 3 Assessment Key 3 - EXCELLENT. You are among top 15% of players we train throughout the world. This is a strength in your game. Elite players will find a way to develop this skill even more. 2 - AVERAGE. Very good, BUTroom for improvement. Playersseeking high level hockey (travel hockey, collegehockey, etc.) MUSTwork hard on these areas to riseabove the competiti 1 - WORK ONTHIS. Thisisan area ofweakness in your game that requires attention to take your gameto thenext level. He/she with theleast amount ofweaknesses wins #1 BACKWARDS SKATING #2 FORWARD SKATING #3 STICKHANDLING Component Assessment Component Assessment Component Assessment Cross Over 2 Cross Over 3 Reach 1 Full Extension 1 Push/Return 3 Wrist Action 2 Recovery 3 Full Extension 2 Head/Eyes up 2 Knee Bend 3 Knee Bend 1 Knee Bend 2 Arm Swing 2 Arm Swing 3 Soft Hands 3 Head Level 3 Head Level 1 Control 3 Power 3 Power 1 Final Score 13 Final Score 17 Final Score 14 #4 EXPLOSIVE STARTS ASSESSMENT #5 CROSS-OVERS #6 SHOOTING-FORWARD/BACK Component Assessment Component Assessment Component Assessment Knee Bend 3 Inside Edges 3 Wind up 3 Full Extension 3 Inside Edge Push 3 Weight 3 Transfer Recovery 3 Outside Edge 1 Follow 1 Through Head Level 1 Knee Bend 3 Balance 3 Arm Swing 3 Head Level 3 Eyes/Head up 3 Power 3 Torso Twist 3 Shot Power 3 Final Score 16 Reach long strides 3 Final Score 16 Practice Ready 2 Game Ready 2 Final Score 19 A team=3; B team = 2; C team =1 Final Score 4 #1 BACKWARDS SKATING #2 FORWARD SKATING #3 STICKHANDLING #4 EXPLOSIVE STARTS ASSESSMENT #5 CROSS-OVERS #6 SHOOTING-FORWARD/BACK RECOMMENDATION LAST SEASON SCRIMMAGE TOTAL SCORE 81% 67% 72% 89% 90% 89% 100% 67% 82% Comments: Player overall is a game changer, but likes to mess around in practice a lot. Player does not listen but knows how to play the game. His stride is good and lateral moves and turns are great. Current stats include 6 goals and 4 assists. 35

38 Head Coaches and Assistant Coaches Head coaches are recommended for each team by the ACE Coordinator and approved by the Youth Hockey. The ACE Coordinator shall providethe Youth Hockey with coaching applications and documentation for all coaching candidates that applied. The appointed head coach will select his own assistant coaches with approval by the ACE Coordinator and the Youth Hockey. All coaches must complete a coach's application form, Disclosure Statement and Code of Conduct. Regular season coaches are to be involved in the following year s tryouts if requested to do so. Coaches selected will be responsible for finalizing the team. Coaching Certification Requirements The following information is from the USA Hockey Website - Please see the website to ensure information has not changed. Certification All coaches, head and assistant, must have the USA Hockey Coaching Education Program Card and appropriate level of certification by December 31 of the current hockey season. If unable to produce a current up to date Coaching Education Program Card, with appropriate level certification (per coaching grid) by December 31 of the current season, the coach in question will be INELIGIBLE to coach any on-ice activities. This includes practices and games. Coaches should follow all requirements that are listed on USA Hockey s website ( * NOTE: Approval from Youth Hockey is needed before reimbursement of a coaching certification. Reimbursement will be allowed only for level three and below, unless Youth Hockey, ACE Coordinator, and the Board agree to allow reimbursement for a higher level. Coaching Clinics For an up to date list of coaching clinic times and locations and other rules regarding coaching, see the USA Hockey Website - For general clinic questions, contact the ACE Coordinator. Coaches Guide for Developing a Player All coaches are required to review the Coaching Education Program from USA Hockey using the link below for the appropriate age level. What are the steps to become a Hockey Coach? 36

39 1. Lakers Coaching Application - Fill out coaching application on the Lakers Hockey website 2. USA Hockey Clinic Registration - Fill out online before December 31 st. a. Give Confirmation number to Team Manager b. Give receipt of cost to Rink Office Manager for reimbursement c. Print CEP (will look like this below) after you complete the course for your records. d. Find, register and attend the required certification clinic. (Cost is $40 plus any lunch fees if applicable) You can only attend one clinic per season. (The coaching clinic season for Levels 1-3 officially runs from September 1 to December 31). Continue below to find a clinic. e. Complete the online age-specific module(s) for the age level of play you are coaching. (Cost is $10 per module) (The online modules are available from September 1 to December 31.) Click here for the modules. f. Must attend the required clinic and complete the necessary online age-specific module(s) by December 31 of the current playing season to continue coaching on January 1. Search for Coaching Certification Level Last Name First Name CEP# Videti Den City State Level Select Select Coach Results Results per page 5 First Name CEP # City State Level Expire Date DENNIS SHEBOYGAN WI 3 12/31/ Safe Sport Go to USA Hockey and complete Safe Sport. 37

40 4. Modules Give cost to Rink Office Manager for reimbursement Print for your records. Bill To Kyle B Korpi HEDGESTONE LN HOWARDS GROVE, WI Registrant KYLE KORPI HEDGESTONE LN HOWARDS GROVE, WI Order Summary Transaction Date: 10/31/2014 Transaction ID: VLCAB Credit Card (last 4): Module 14 And Under Background Check-WAHA Print off the receipt and turn it in to the rink office for reimbursement. Tax $0.00 Total $10.00 ACE Coordinator Responsibilities (Association Coaching and Education) Coordinate coaching education activities and maintain coaching resource library Hear grievances brought forth by parents during the season about coaching issues Responsible for coachrecruitment Conduct evaluations and critiques coaches 38

41 Coach s Rights Coach Rights & Responsibilities Be treated with respect by players, parents and the Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center Have access to all available materials aimed at improving the coaching experience. Has the authority to sit a player for a shift, period or game for competitive, performance, or disciplinary reasons. Has access to necessary safety and practice equipment. Coach s Responsibilities The coach is a teacher of hockey skills and is responsible for the social, psychological and physical development of all players in his/her care. They are accountable to the Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center, ACE Coordinator, Youth Hockey and the Board of Directors and will be evaluated. Observe USA Hockey Zero Tolerance Policy as posted at Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center. Communicate with Team Manager regarding the following: finances, scheduling, team communications, etc. Coaches are responsible for the conduct of team prior to, during and after all practices and games in the lockerrooms. Schedule a parent meeting prior to the season to discuss philosophy, goals, finances and other team matters. Support the philosophy and practices of the Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center.and cooperate with the Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center Board of Directors to enforce rules, regulations, and policies as established by Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center, WAHA, and USA Hockey. Communicate with players and parents and handle complaints in a fair and courteous manner. The coach is a model for the players, and must be courteous and maintain self-control when dealing with players, coaches, officials and referees. Protect the health and safety of all players at all times when under his/her care. Be present at all practices andgames. Uphold the authority of theofficials. Conduct practices and games so all players have an opportunity to improve their skills by active and fairparticipation. Treat all players fairly. Understand and teach the fundamental skills, techniques and strategies of hockey to each team member. Encourage and compliment players -criticism should be constructive only. Learn the strengths and weaknesses of each player in order to provide the maximum opportunity forsuccess. Make hockey rewarding and fun while also maintaining team discipline. Players and parents should be told, in advance, of your expectations and consequences for lack of performance or poor behavior. When discipline is necessary, the player should be told the reasons why they are missing a shift or a period. 39

42 Coach s Expectations The ACE Coordinator/Youth Hockey encourages all coaches to develop a list of expectations for their players. This list should include, but is not limited to, the coach's policies towards Appearance andgrooming Punctuality at, or absence from games or practice, including vacations Off iceconditioning Illness or injury Transportation Uniforms Playing times Team meetings, including "chalktalks" Responsibility ofparents Locker roombehavior Behavior at home and away before and after practice & games Behavior at games, both on ice & on the bench Sportsmanship Any other topic that effects the success of a season The coach s policies should include penalties, if any, for violating team rules. The policies should be consistent with the age and maturity level of the players on the team. If possible, the expectations should be in writing and should be discussed before the season begins with players and parents present. 40

43 Coach s Agreement between Sheboygan Blue Line Association This Agreement is written so that the coach understands the importance of following the CODE OF CONDUCT set forth by the Sheboygan Blue Line Association Board of Directors and the Youth Hockey. All participants in High School as well as Youth Programs MUST complete the attached form and return it to the Youth Hockey prior to the end of tryouts. This is a contract between coach and Sheboygan Blue Line Association. By signing this contract the coach acknowledges that they will adhere to all rules set forth by the Conduct/Training Regulations. Additionally, coach certifies that they have received and reviewed the Youth Hockey Booklet and agree to all practices, policies, and procedures outlined therein. Coach Age Division Coach Name Signature: Date This contract needs to be signed by the coach and returned to Youth Hockey before tryouts start on the first night. 41

44 Coach Code of Conduct Sheboygan Lakers Season I will remember that the kids are here to learn and to have fun. I will treat my team s players, their parents, the opposing team s players, coaches and parents with respect. I will refrain from using foul language towards my players, other coaches, officials or opponents. I will teach my players to play fairly and to respect teammates, opponents and referees. I will teach my players to play by the rules of the game. I will ensure that all players get adequate instruction. I will do my best to organize practices that are fun and challenging for all players. I will be generous with praise and set a good example. I will continue to upgrade my coaching skills and training techniques. I will never instruct a player to deliberately injure another player. I will remember that a goal is to win, but not at all costs. I will accept defeat respectfully and love the game above the outcome. Coach s Name [print]: Coach s Signature: Date: 42

45 What are the steps to become a Team Manager? Team Managers Rights & Responsibilities 1. Approved by the Head Coach 2. Complete Safe Sport certification: Go to USA Hockey and complete Safe Sport. Team Manager Rights Be treated with respect by players, parents and the Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center. Have access to all available materials at Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center, necessary to organize their team. Obtain support and assistance from parents on the team. Be reimbursed for all expenses normally incurred to manage a team. Team Manager Responsibilities The team manager's primary responsibility is to act as a liaison between the parents and the coaching staff. You are the core of organization for the team. This position requires the collection and dissemination of important information to parents and players as well as managing schedules, fees, rosters and home game organization. Fill out USA Hockey/WAHA roster and submit to the Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center registrar. Verify birth certificates of all players with the rink office / Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center registrar. (Return skater s documentation or birth certificates) Must have the final verified WAHA roster with you at all games and tournaments. Provide a copy of the team and coaching roster to each parent including the players name, jersey number, address, phone number, parents names and s. Notify Head scheduler as well as opposing teams of any schedule changes. Notify Sheboygan Laker Rink office of any home game schedule changes or cancellations. Collect the fees for the state tournament, which must be submitted usually in early December. Coordinate the initial season meeting and all subsequent meetings the coach s request. The first meeting provides a great opportunity to explain to parents your role on the team. Maintain a current team schedule and provide updates to coaches and parents as necessary. Notify parents and players of the practice schedule changes. Maintain regular communication with the coaching staff. Be available at practices when information needs to be handed out. Confirm ALL home and away games with the team managers of the opposing team several days inadvance. 43

46 Organize parents to handle scoring, penalty box, and announcing duties for all home games. Notify the parents of tournaments, collect the fees, register team and reserve hotel for team. You or a designee must serve on the Tournament Committee and assist Blue Line in the organization of any home tournaments and or special events for the coming year. Notify parents of the dates for equipment at the end of the season. Mandatory attendance at the Team Managers meeting. 44

47 Player Rights Have fun in sports Player & Parent Rights and Responsibilities Participate at a level commensurate with maturity and ability. Participate in a safe and healthy environment. Betreated fairly and with dignity. Have an opportunity to develop ability and strive for success To be taught fundamentals and sportsmanship. Player Responsibilities Players should take pride in themselves and their team. Follow directions given by the coach and be willing to accept constructive criticism. Observe USA Hockey Zero Tolerance Policy as posted at Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center Have pride and confidence in yourself. Work hard in practice and games. Be a competitor, perform up to ability and contribute to team unity. Compliment teammates and let the coach handle criticism. Show respect towards opposing coaches, players, and referees Good conduct on and off the ice. If it wouldn't be tolerated at home or at school, it will not be tolerated at arenas, whether home or away. Participate at all games and practices. Use proper equipment; keep it clean and in good repair. Take a responsible attitude towards your health. Adhere to the Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center Code of Conduct. Maintain good school habits, grades and attendance. Maintaining a clean locker room-whether at home rink or away Parent Rights Have your player treated fairly and with respect. Have your player playing and practicing in a safe and healthy environment. Have your player engaged in activities that increase his/her skill and enjoyment of the sport. Have the right to communicate directly with anyone associated with the club (coaches, board, etc.) 45

48 Parent Responsibilities Your child's participation in the hockey program will require a significant contribution of your time and effort. The parent can contribute many things to support their child, team and program. Observe USA Hockey Zero Tolerance Policy as posted on Sheboygan Lakers website as well as posted around the rink. Compliment and encourage. Let the coach handle coaching and criticism. Leave the "coaching" to thecoach. Support your coaches. Remember that they have many children for whom they are responsible. Don't compare your child with other players. Be honest with yourself about his/her capabilities. Regard each player on theteam as your own. Keep negative comments toyourself. Teach your child to have fun and enjoy competition. Don't tell your child that winning does not count because it does and they know it. Instead, help your child develop a healthy competitive attitude towards winning and losing. Personally, make sure your player has transportation to and from games, practices, scrimmages and tournaments. Hockey is a time consuming and financially demanding sport. Carefully consider these demands before committing your player to the season. Maintain self-control and exemplify good sportsmanship, refraining from open criticism of officials, coaches and otherparents or players. Recognize the importance of volunteer coaches. They are important to the development of your child and the sport. Communicate with them and support them. Remember that you, as well as your team, represent the community. Take care of your financial responsibilities to the Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center promptly. Remember the locker room is for the players and coaches. Support the philosophies and policies of the Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center Offer to help whenever youcan. Assist the association by completing your child/children's coaches end of year evaluation form. 46

49 Player and Parent Conduct The Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center provides and maintains a competitive ice hockey program for all youth in Sheboygan County and the surrounding area. The Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center has standards of responsibility and expectations that each participant must strive to fulfill. The Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center requires each participant to strive for excellence not only while playing, but also in areas of conduct and behavior. Any actions or behaviors that are unacceptable can result in suspension from competition, practice, or, in severe cases expulsion from the Association without refund of dues paid. Any violations of the following regulations should be reported directly to a member of the Disciplinary Committee. Violations 1. Posses, transport, consume, sell, or use alcoholic or malt beverages, controlled substances, and/or drug paraphernalia. 2. Posses, consume, or use smoking or smokeless tobacco, or unauthorized inhalants. 3. Commit any willful, persistent, or disruptive behavior or any act in violation of or subject to penalty under Wisconsin State Statutes of local ordinance. 4. Commit any willful, persistent, disruptive behavior or any act in violation of rules, or policies established by Sheboygan Blue Line Association Board of Directors. 5. Direct threatening, abusive, profane, derogatory or obscene language or gestures at other competitors, coaches, officials (including minor officials), team managers, fans or other interested parties while on Sheboygan Blue Line Association premises, or at premises of other Hockey Associations with which wecompete. Penalties First Offense Second Offense Third Offense 1 game suspension-up to quarter season Suspension half season Entire season 1. The regular season shall be interpreted as the number of games scheduled at the beginning of the season. 2. A player on suspension may continue to practice with permission from the player's coach and the Disciplinary Committee. 3. Tournaments, play downs and State Tournaments are included as part of the regular season. 4. A player who is penalized must serve his/her penalty in the season in which the infraction occurred, or, if the violation occurs and sufficient games do not remain on the schedule for the penalty to be served in the existing season, the Disciplinary Committee may impose the penalty at the start of the next seasons play. 5. In case of severe or aggravated incident(s) occurring on the first or second violation, the Disciplinary Committee may suspend the rules, and impose a more severe penalty consistent with theviolation. 6. Individuals who are incarcerated or are subject to electronic monitoring are not eligible to participate as players, coaches or officials in Sheboygan Blue Line Association games or practices. Individuals may reinstate at the end of their term after meeting with the 47

50 Disciplinary Committee. The Disciplinary Committee will determine if it is in the best interest of Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center to reinstate the player, coach, or official. Reporting of Violations 1. Any Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center member may report a suspect violation(s) of Conduct/trainingregulations. 2. The report must be in writing, and signed by the complainant. The complaint should contain the nature of the alleged violation and when and where it occurred. The complaint should contain enough pertinent factual information to substantiate the report. The name of the complainant will be kept confidential if possible. 3. The Disciplinary Committee will review the report, and, if there is a sufficient ground to substantiate the complaint, a meeting will be scheduled with the player, and his or her parent(s). guardian(s) or legal custodian within five days of when the complaint was received. 4. If the player admits to the allegation(s), the appropriate penalty will be imposed. The player's coach will be notified of the penalty as soon as possible. 5. If the player denies the allegation, the Disciplinary Committee will conduct an investigation, and will determine as soon as practical, whether the complaint is justified. The Disciplinary Committee may call the complainant and other interested parties to aid in their investigation. 6. The player will be eligible to practice and compete until the investigation is completed. 7. If divided, the Disciplinary Committee will vote whether to substantiate the allegation. A simple majority will be the margin to substantiate the allegation. 8. If substantiated, the appropriate penalty will be imposed. The player's coach will be notified of the penalty as soon as possible. 9. The player, his or her parent(s), guardian(s), or legal custodian(s), may appeal the decision to the Board of Directors of the Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center. The Board may review the Discipline Committees action, and consistent with Board rules, may confirm or deny the appeal. 10. If the Board confirms the Disciplinary Committee's recommendation, the penalty imposed by the Disciplinary Committee will be implemented. The player's coach will be notified as soon as possible. 11. Any Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center Board of Director's action will be final. 48

51 Player Agreement between Sheboygan Blue Line Association This Agreement is written so that the athlete and parent or guardian of the said athlete understand the importance of following the CODE OF CONDUCT set forth by the Sheboygan Blue Line Association Board of Directors and the Youth Hockey. All participants in High School as well as Youth Programs MUST complete the attached form and return it to the Youth Hockey prior to the end of tryouts. This is a contract between skater and parent or guardian of skater and Sheboygan Blue Line Association. By signing this contract the skater and parent or guardian acknowledges that they will adhere to all rules set forth by the Conduct/Training Regulations. Additionally, skater and parent or guardians certify that they have received and reviewed the Youth Hockey Booklet and agree to all practices, policies, and procedures outlined therein. The set of jerseys that are borrowed to the skater for the hockey season must be returned by April 15 or you will be invoiced for $110 to cover replacement costs or for anything damaged non-game damaged. Skaters Age Division Skater s Name Signature: Parent / Guardian Signature Date Please fill out 1 form per skater. Additional forms are available at the Sheboygan Lakers Ice Center. This contract needs to be signed by both the athlete and parent and returned to Youth Hockey before tryouts start on the first night. 49

52 Player Code of Conduct Sheboygan Lakers Season I play hockey to have fun. I will respect my coaches at all times and listen carefully to their instructions. I understand that they are giving their time to make me a better hockey player. I will show good sportsmanship at all times, both when winning and losing. I will always congratulate the other team and wish them good luck. I will play according to the rules, even if no one is watching. I will have a positive attitude and won t quit on my teammates or coaches. I will do my best to be a team player, win without bragging and lose without making excuses. I will remember that the coaches and referees are there to help me. I will accept their decisions and show them respect. I don t expect special treatment from my coaches or teammates. I will achieve my goals through my own hard work. I will always leave the locker room clean and in good condition, both at my home rink and away. During the season, hockey comes first. All other activities come second, except schoolwork. I will not use profanity in practice or games as my language and behavior is seen as a reflection of the entire Laker organization. Player s Name [print]: Player s Signature: Date: 50

53 Parent Code of Conduct Sheboygan Lakers Season I will not force my child to play hockey. They will come to the rink out of their own desire. I believe that my child plays hockey for his/her own enjoyment, not mine. I will leave the coaching to the coaching staff. I will encourage my child to play in a manner consistent with the coach s strategy. I will not undermine the coach s authority by trying to be a coach instead of a parent. I will never ridicule or yell at my child for making a mistake or losing a game. I understand that making mistakes is a key part of learning. I will never vocally question the referee s decisions. I will never taunt or yell at players, officials, coaches or other spectators. I may not always agree with them, but I will always respect the coaches who volunteer their time to mentor my child. I will do my best to provide a positive experience for my child and for all of their Laker teammates. Parent s Name [print]: Parent s Signature: Date: 51

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