Meteorology. Circle the letter that corresponds to the correct answer

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1 Chapter 7 Worksheet 2 Meteorology Name: Circle the letter that corresponds to the correct answer 1) Which of the following factors contributes to the general subsidence in the latitude zone 20 degrees to 35 degrees? a) both the Coriolis force and radiation cooling b) the Coriolis force c) radiation cooling of the air d) release of latent heat 2) Most of the United States is situated in which zone of prevailing winds? a) doldrums b) trade winds c) westerlies d) subpolar easterlies e) northerlies 3) The doldrums are associated with what latitude(s)? a) the Tropic of Cancer b) the equator c) the midlatitudes d) the poles 4) The prevailing winds that blow from the horse latitudes toward the doldrums are called: a) subtropical northerlies. b) westerlies. c) trade winds. d) polar easterlies. e) southerlies. 5) The term "Hadley cell" applies to: a) 0 degrees to 30 degrees latitude. b) the whole atmosphere. c) 30 degrees to 60 degrees latitude. d) 60 degrees to 90 degrees latitude. e) the poles and the equator. 6) Taken as a whole, the large scale or general circulation patterns of the atmosphere exist: a) as nature's method of balancing heat energy differences. b) as a result of Earth's motion through space. c) because of the earth's rotation. d) as a cause of temperature contrasts. e) as a result of the different landforms on Earth's surface.

2 7) The divergence near the ground that is associated with the subtropical high pressure zone can be cited as the origin of: a) polar easterlies. b) jet streams. c) cyclogenesis. d) sea breeze. e) trade winds. 8) Another name for the subtropical high is: a) horse latitudes. b) doldrums. c) trades. d) prevailing westerlies. e) subpolar calm. 9) The Sahara and Australian deserts (among others) are associated with which pressure belt? a) subtropical high b) subpolar low c) equatorial low d) polar high 10) The subpolar low (polar front) is: a) a zone where the polar easterlies and the westerlies converge. b) a zone where the trade winds of the two hemispheres meet. c) the boundary between frozen and liquid ocean. d) the forward edge of the antarctic ice cap. 11) Concerning rainfall patterns, areas of persistent high pressure tend to cause a) desert regions. b) pronounced wet and dry seasons. c) severe flooding. d) moderate rainfall. 12) Surface high pressure zones are usually associated with: a) ascending air. b) clear or nearly clear weather. c) converging winds. d) stormy weather. 13) The region where the northeast trades meet the southeast trades is known as the: a) ITCZ. b) hot zone. c) high latitudes. d) subtropics. e) rainforest.

3 14) The C in ITCZ stands for convergence. What does the convergence refer to? a) surface winds along the equator b) winds aloft near the poles c) surface winds in the mid latitudes d) surface winds in a monsoon 15) The prevailing winds that tend to influence cities such as Chicago and New York City are a) westerlies. b) polar easterlies. c) doldrums. d) trade winds. e) southerlies. 16) Although the idealized version of Earth features continuous pressure belts that continue zonally around the planet, the real Earth has broken up pressure cells that vary seasonally. What explains this? a) The effects of the Coriolis force vary seasonally. b) Large landmasses heat differently than oceans and interrupt the pressure pattern. c) The oceans experience drastic temperature changes from season to season. d) The intensity of incoming solar radiation varies radically along the same line of latitude. 17) During the summer season, the subtropical high found in the North Atlantic is also called the: a) Azores high. b) Atlantic high. c) Bermuda high. d) Carolina high. 18) The definition of the word monsoon means: a) rainy season. b) torrential rainfall. c) seasonal wind shift. d) moisture laden air. 19) The large rainfall totals associated with the Indian monsoon occur when: a) the winds shift to the north, blowing off of the Eurasian subcontinent. b) the ITCZ shifts to the north, near the Himalaya Mountains. c) high pressure develops over the Indian subcontinent. d) the ITCZ shifts south towards the Tropic of Capricorn. 20) Large scale wind circulation systems that reverse with the seasons are called: a) meridional cells. b) typhoons. c) tropical cyclones. d) monsoons. e) tropical anticyclones. 21) Every year, the clockwise circulation around the subtropical high helps to: a) transport 40 million tons of dust from the Sahara Desert to the Amazon rainforest. b) lead hurricanes eastward across the Atlantic. c) deliver 20 million tons of carbon dioxide generated in Africa into the air above North America. d) speed ozone depletion by lifting CFCs into the stratosphere.

4 22) A primary factor causing monsoon circulations is: a) mountain ranges. b) greater temperature changes over continents compared to oceans. c) waves in the westerlies. d) ocean currents. e) Coriolis effect. 23) The intense rain of India's monsoon season is attributed to: a) increased moisture advection from the north. b) the arrival of the subtropical high. c) the northward migration of the ITCZ. d) the cooler winter temperatures, which make it easier for water vapor to condense. 24) City X experiences very dry conditions in the winter, along with a prevailing northerly wind. In the summer, the prevailing winds shift to southerly and the rainfall at City X increases by a factor of 10. What can you say about the general climate regime of City X? a) It must be located under the ITCZ for most of the year. b) It must be located deep in the interior of a large continent. c) It is probably at a high latitude. d) It has a monsoon climate. Circle T if the statement is true or F if the statement is false T F 25) Seasonal changes in pressure are greater over continents than over the oceans. T F 26) For much of South and Southeast Asia, winter is a period characterized by relatively dry conditions. T F 27) The strong Siberian high becomes well developed in the summer. T F 28) The United States does not experience a monsoon. T F 29) The United States is completely unaffected by monsoons. T F 30) The slopes of the Indian Himalayas can be some of the rainiest in the world. T F 31) Westerly flow aloft is unrelated to the earth's rotation. T F 32) The temperature difference between the poles and the equator drive the westerlies. T F 33) Since the equator to pole pressure gradient increases with altitude, one would expect the westerlies to decrease in speed with increasing altitude. T F 34) Jet stream winds are completely distinct from the midlatitude westerlies. T F 35) Typically, four to six Rossby waves encompass the earth. T F 36) The existence of jet streams was first determined by Ben Franklin as the result of his kite experiments. T F 37) The polar jet stream usually slows down in winter. Answer the following questions 38) The intensity of the atmosphere's large scale circulation patterns is weaker in summer compared to the winter. Why does this occur?

5 39) The winter season is associated with strong centers of pressure over the continents while centers of pressure intensify over the oceans. 40) The direction of the prevailing winds at mid and upper levels in the troposphere is from the west. List the two factors that cause this westerly direction to prevail.

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