CONFINED SPACE REGIONAL CODE OF PRACTICE

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1 CONFINED SPACE REGIONAL CODE OF PRACTICE 1 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

2 PURPOSE To define a Regional Code of Practice which will ensure the safety of workers who enter a Confined or Restricted Space and meet requirements of Alberta s Occupational Health and Safety, Act, Regulation and Code. At any time should Legislation requirements change they shall take precedence over this Code. Exceptions to this Standard or Regional Code of Practice must be endorsed by the Senior Management of HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES. DISCLAIMER The information in this publication is solely for general illustration and instructional purposes and does not, in any way, create a business or professional services relationship. The Standards set out herein will not apply to every circumstance. The Standards are not a definitive guide to the OH&S Act (Occupational Health & Safety Act) or the accompanying Regulations and regardless of the Standards set out herein; each reader and user is solely responsible for their own compliance with all applicable Legislation, including the OH&S Act. The HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES assumes no obligation to update the Standards set out herein or to advise on further developments concerning the topics mentioned herein. The Occupational Health, Safety and training of employees in the workplace remain the responsibility of each employer and employee. HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES and its employees, agents and contractors. are not responsible for the contents of this Standard, for any errors or omissions herein or for the results obtained from the use of the information contained in this Standard or for any training programs that may be developed from the use of the information in this Standard. Each Training Provider is completely responsible for its own training programs. All information set out in this Standard is provided as is, with no guarantee of completeness, accuracy, timeliness or of the results obtained from the use of this Standard. INTRODUCTION The entry of Confined and Restricted Spaces is a necessary part of the operation and maintenance of the Oil Sands Facilities. Entries are required for inspections; maintenance; repairs and cleaning; oilfield activities, or any other similar operations which are done as a part of the daily operation of the plant sites and are essential for the continued ongoing operation of the facilities. Unplanned or uncontrolled Confined or Restricted Space entries can potentially be extremely hazardous to the health of those attempting to execute them. The practice outlined herein is viewed as a means of protecting the health of the individual by significantly reducing the risk of accidental injury associated with entering Confined or Restricted Spaces, and to make the employee aware of the hazards associated with the work and the safe practices necessary to deal with these hazards. Understanding and applying the Health and Safety principles are fundamental to the proper implementation of this Code of Practice. This Code of Practice supports the fundamental principles developed by each operating area or facility under each organization s Management Systems. It also identifies the maintenance required of ongoing programs to ensure the safety and health of all workers and reduce the probability and magnitude of incidents in and around Confined or Restricted Spaces at the Oil Sands plant sites. Each facility shall develop and regularly audit its own specific standards to ensure that such standards meet the needs of their specific work place and comply with the Code and all applicable Legislative safety requirements. 2 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

3 SCOPE This Code of Practice applies to all employees under the HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES umbrella, contractors, subcontractors and vendors. ACCOUNTABILITY In accordance with the Alberta Occupational Health & Safety (OH & S) Act, Chapter 1, Section 2 (1) Obligations of employers, workers, etc. 1) Every employer shall ensure, as far as it is reasonably practicable for the employer to do so, a. The health and safety of: I. Workers engaged in the work of that employer, and ii. Those workers not engaged in the work of that employer but present at the work site at which that work is being carried out, and b. That the workers engaged in the work of that employer are aware of their responsibilities and duties under this Act, the regulations and the adopted code. 2) Every worker shall, while engaged in an occupation: a. Take reasonable care to protect the health and safety of the worker and of other workers present while the worker is working, and b. Co-operate with the worker s employer for the purposes of protecting the health and safety of: i. The worker, ii. Other workers engaged in the work of the employer, and iii. Other workers not engaged in the work of that employer but present at the work site at which that work is being carried out. EMPLOYER AND EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES EMPLOYER RESPONSIBILITIES In addition to Section 1.4 of this RCOP where a Confined Space is to be entered by workers the employer or designate (e.g. Supervisor) is responsible to ensure that: a. Adequate steps have been taken to eliminate/control all hazards present, b. All applicable Legislative requirements, this Code of Practice and any other facilities specific standards, rules, procedures, and practices are followed, c. Ensure all workers are competent (see Definition Appendix II) to perform duties assigned. This can be achieved by completing and signing the Competency Guide Line (see Appendix III) or by developing your own competency assurance guide. Frequency of the competency assurance is left to the discretion of the Employer. When utilized this Competency Assurance must be documented and retained (See Appendix IV). 3 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

4 EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES In addition to Section 1.4 of this RCOP where a Confined Space is to be entered by workers the employee is responsible to ensure that: a. They have received training to perform task or duties assigned, b. They utilize the training received to perform task or duties assigned, c. They follow all applicable Legislative requirements, this Code of Practice and any other facilities specific standards, rules, procedures, and practices, d. They identify to their supervisor when they feel they are not competent to perform the tasks or duties assigned. CONFINED SPACE AND RESTRICTED SPACE - RCOP BASICS HAZARD ASSESSMENTS In generality, the purpose of a hazard assessment is to identify and evaluate those conditions that could lead to workers getting hurt or becoming ill. Assessing hazards involves taking a look at what could harm workers at a workplace the typical question to ask is What could go wrong? Doing a hazard assessment allows the employer and employees to identify whether appropriate precautions have already been taken to prevent accidents and injuries, or whether more needs to be done. A hazard assessment takes into account the hazards specific to the work task being done. It also takes into account the potential for hazards present in the surroundings to affect the worker performing the task e.g. movement of vehicles, upset of stored materials, collapse of unsecured structures, collapse of earthen piles, surrounding processes, adjacent activities, when processes or conditions change, etc. CONFINED SPACE AND RESTRICTED SPACE HAZARD ASSESSMENTS As per Part 5, Section 45 of the Alberta Occupational Health & Safety Code: If a worker will enter a Confined Space or a Restricted Space to work, an employer must appoint a competent person to: a. Identify and assess the hazards the worker is likely to be exposed to while in the Confined Space or Restricted Space, b. Specify the type and frequency of inspections and tests necessary to determine the likelihood of worker exposure to any of the identified hazards, c. Perform the inspections and tests specified, d. Specify the safety and personal equipment required to perform the work, and e. Identify the personal protective equipment and emergency equipment to be used by a worker who undertakes rescue operations in the event of an accident or other emergency. This assessment will also include and identify emergency evacuation and communication requirements. 4 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

5 This assessment will be written, dated and approved by appropriate level of supervision. Note: Affected workers will be involved in the hazard assessment and in the control or elimination of the hazards identified (i.e. through the Field Level Hazard Assessment, Job Hazard Analysis, or Permit System processes) HIERARCHY OF HAZARD ASSESSMENT FOR CONFINED SPACES AND RESTRICTED SPACES Hazard assessments related to Confined Space or Restricted Space Entries are conducted by various levels of employers and employees involved in the preparation of and entry of the Confined or Restricted Space. Multiple levels of hazard assessment are required to determine if a space is a Confined Space - Level 1, 2 or 3 or a Restricted Space. Identification of the type of space will be determined by the specific tasks conducted within the space. a. Initial Hazard Assessment for Entry i. Normally performed by the equipment owner, ii. Considers current and past service of the equipment, iii. Considers the design, access and egress limitations, iv. Considers all preparation and controls required if applicable, to permit safe entry. b. Work Scope Hazard Assessment (e.g. Job Safety Analysis) i. Normally performed by the supervision of the crew undertaking the task with worker involvement, ii. Considers the detailed scope of work to be performed and the impact that the work may have on the atmosphere within the space or the personnel entering or working in the space, iii. Identifies the hazards associated with the detailed scope of work to be performed and details the required controls to address the hazards identified, iv. Any changes in work scope at any time must be relayed back to the equipment owner so that the classification of entry can be re-examined to ensure the correct classification of the space. c. Field Level Hazard Assessment i. Normally performed by all workers involved in the task, ii. Considers immediate ambient conditions in the task area prior to commencement of work, iii. Identifies hazards related to the specific task(s) being performed and details the required controls to address the hazards identified, iv. Shall be updated to reflect any changes in the task identifying any new related hazards and controls. 5 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

6 TRAINING Role of Employer 1) An employer must ensure that a worker assigned duties related to Confined Space or a Restricted Space Entry is trained by a competent person in: a. Recognizing hazards associated with working in Confined Spaces or Restricted Spaces, and b. Performing the worker s duties in a safe and healthy manner. NOTE WORKERS TRAINING MUST MEET OIL SANDS SAFETY ASSOCIATION (OSSA) REQUIREMENTS 2) An employer must keep records of the training given under subsection (1) 3) An employer must ensure that competence in the following is represented in the workers responding to a Confined Space or Restricted Space emergency: a. First aid, 6 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

7 b. The use of appropriate emergency response equipment, c. Procedures appropriate to the Confined Space or Restricted Space. SAFETY AND PROTECTION Employers Responsibility 1) An employer must ensure that: a. If a Lifeline is required in a Confined Space or a Restricted Space, it is used in a manner that does not create an additional hazard. b. The safety and personal protective equipment required is available to workers entering a Confined Space or Restricted Space, c. A worker, who enters, occupies or leaves a Confined Space or Restricted Space uses the safety and personal protective equipment, d. The personal protective, emergency and rescue equipment required is available to workers undertaking rescue operations in a Confined Space or Restricted Space, e. Equipment appropriate to Confined Space or Restricted Space, including Personal Protective Equipment, is available to perform a timely rescue, and; f. A communication system is established that is readily available to workers in a Confined Space or Restricted Space and is appropriate to the hazards. (See Definition in Appendix II), g. Workers in a Confined Space or Restricted Space are protected from hazards created by traffic in the vicinity of the Confined Space or Restricted Space, h. Workers affected by the hazards identified in the hazard assessment report will be informed of the hazards and the methods used to control or eliminate the hazards. 2) An employer must ensure that all personal protective equipment, and emergency equipment required for use in a Confined Space or Restricted Space is inspected by a competent person before workers enter the Confined Space or Restricted Space to ensure the equipment is in good working order. a. Each employee is responsible for inspection of his or her basic Personal Protective Equipment (PPE); documentation of inspection will be recorded on the workers Field Level Risk Assessment (FLRA), b. Employer shall ensure specialized PPE and emergency equipment will be inspected and maintained as per manufacturer s specifications. 3) An employer must ensure that written records of the inspections required by legislation are retained. (e.g. FLRA, Job Safety Analysis (JSA) sign off, Respiratory Protective Equipment (RPE) as per Legislation, etc.). EMERGENCY RESPONSE As per Part 5, Section 55 of the Alberta Occupational Health & Safety Code: 1) An employer must ensure that a worker does not enter or remain in a Confined Space or Restricted Space unless an effective rescue can be carried out. 2) A worker must not enter or stay in a Confined Space or Restricted Space unless an effective rescue can be carried out. 7 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

8 3) An employer must ensure that the emergency response plan includes the emergency procedures in place to evacuate the Confined Space or Restricted Space immediately. a. When an alarm is activated, b. If the concentration of oxygen inside the confined space drops below 19.5 percent by volume or exceeds 23.0 percent by volume, or c. If there is a significant change in the amount of hazardous substances inside the Confined Space. 4) An employer must ensure that an effective means of communication is in place to summon emergency response. SECTION 1 - CONFINED SPACE Confined Space Definition Confined Space is an enclosed or partially enclosed space, not intended for continuous human occupancy that has a restricted, limited or impeded means of entry or exit because of its oilfield, which may become hazardous to a worker because of: a. An atmosphere that is or may be injurious by reason of oxygen deficiency or enrichment, flammability, explositivity, or toxicity, b. A condition or changing set of circumstances within the space that present a potential for injury or illness, or c. The potential or inherent characteristics of an activity which can produce adverse or harmful consequences within the space. Identifying a Confined Space 1) A location will be considered a Confined Space if: a. It is determined by an approved Hazard Assessment that it is a Confined Space, b. Entry requires permitting and gas testing, as designated by area work practices, c. Activities conducted within or within the vicinity of the Confined Space has the potential to change the atmospheric conditions of the Confined Space, d. Requires additional equipment preparation and controls to permit safe entry. CLASSIFICATION OF CONFINED SPACE LEVELS To reflect the relative hazards, and to ensure a consistent approach, Confined Space entries have been classified into Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3. The classification of entry shall be based on the conditions present at the time of entry with consideration for potential changes of conditions as identified in the hazard assessment. Note: A person must not enter or work at a work area if more than 20 percent of the lower explosive limit of a flammable or explosive substance is present in the atmosphere (as per OH&S Code Part 10) 8 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

9 Confined Space Level 1 1) A Confined Space will be considered Level 1 if the entry is either the first or initial entry or any of the following apply: a. The hazards in the Confined Space or in its proximity are either not known or have not been determined, b. Oxygen concentration is less than 19.5% or more than 23.0% by volume, c. Explosive or flammable atmosphere between 10% and 20% Lower Explosive Limit ( LEL ), d. The area atmosphere exceeds the protective limits of air purifying respiratory equipment or is at/or above IDLH (Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health) concentration of a toxic material/substance. 2) The following controls must be put in place for a Level 1 classified entry: a. Will require an approved hazard assessment, b. Supplied breathing air available and worn, c. Continuous atmospheric testing, d. All Entrants and Monitors must be trained in the use of supplied breathing air equipment, e. PPE as per the approved hazard assessment, f. A competent Confined Space Monitor in attendance at all times, g. A specific, documented Rescue Plan which has been developed reviewed and approved by the equipment owner and the Emergency Response Representative, h. A valid Confined Space Entry Permit, i. A valid Level One Entry Tag hung at each entrance, j. A documented Evacuation Plan, k. Confined Space Signage as per the Level of Entry classification. Note: Any time a Level 1 entrance is left unattended the entrance must be barricaded physically and a Danger Do Not Enter sign displayed across the entrance. 9 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

10 Confined Space Level 2 1) A Confined Space will be considered Level 2 if all identified hazards are controlled and a. Oxygen concentration is between 19.5% and 23.0% by volume, and 2) Either of the following exists or is likely to exist: a. Explosive or flammable atmosphere > (greater than) 1% and < (less than) 10% Lower Explosive Limit ( LEL ), b. Concentration of toxic substances exceeds 50% of the Occupational Exposure Limit ( OEL ). 3) The following controls must be put in place for a Level 2 classified entry: a. Will require an approved hazard assessment, b. A Competent Confined Space Monitor in attendance at all times, c. A valid Confined Space Entry Permit, d. A valid Safe Entry Tag hung at each entrance, e. A documented Evacuation Plan, f. A valid Rescue Plan, g. PPE as per the approved hazard assessment, h. Continuous atmospheric testing if there is a potential for the atmosphere to change unpredictably, i. Confined Space Signage as per the Level of Entry Classification. Confined Space Level 3 1) A Confined Space will be considered Level 3 if all identified hazards are controlled, the potential for change is unlikely, and all of the following apply: a. Oxygen concentration is between 19.5% and 23.0% by volume, b. Concentration of explosive gases is less than 1% of LEL, c. Airborne concentration of toxic substances is less than 50% of OEL. 2) The following controls must be put in place for a Level 3 classified entry: a. Will require an approved hazard assessment, b. A competent Confined Space Monitor may be required, c. A valid Confined Space Entry Permit, d. A valid Safe Entry Tag hung at each entrance, e. A documented Evacuation Plan, f. A valid Rescue Plan, g. PPE as per the approved hazard assessment, h. Confined Space Signage as per the Level of Entry classification. Note: If the hazard assessment determines that a Confined Space Monitor is not required at the point of entry, a competent worker must be designated to be in communication with worker(s) in a Confined Space. (e.g. Co-worker, buddy system) The entry log must still be maintained. 10 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

11 Protection - Hazardous Substances and Energy 1) An employer must ensure that workers within a Confined Space are protected by means of isolation against the release of hazardous substances or energy that could harm them. 2) An employer must ensure that a worker does not enter a Confined Space unless adequate precautions are in place to protect a worker from drowning, engulfment or entrapment. Testing the Atmosphere 1) If the hazard assessment identifies a potential atmospheric hazard and a worker is required or authorized by an employer to enter the Confined Space, the employer must ensure that a competent worker performs a pre-entry atmospheric test of the Confined Space: a. Verify that the oxygen content is between 19.5 percent and 23.0 percent by volume, b. Identify the amount of toxic substance, c. Identify the amount of flammable or explosive substance that may be present. 2) The employer must ensure that the testing required is performed using calibrated test instruments appropriate for the atmosphere being tested and the instruments are used in accordance with the manufacturer s specifications. 3) The employer must ensure that as often as necessary after the first time a worker enters the Confined Space, a competent worker: a. Performs and records the tests and, b. Identifies and records any additional hazards. 4) If tests identify additional hazards, the employer must control or eliminate the identified hazards. Any additional hazards identified must be included in the original hazard assessment. Ventilation and Purging 1) If the atmospheric testing identifies that a hazardous atmosphere exists or is likely to exist in a Confined Space, an employer must ensure that the Confined Space is ventilated, purged or both before a worker enters the Confined Space. 2) If ventilating or purging a Confined Space is impractical or ineffective in eliminating a hazardous atmosphere, the employer must ensure that a worker who enters the Confined Space uses personal protective equipment appropriate for the conditions within the Confined Space. 3) If mechanical ventilation is needed to maintain a safe atmosphere in a Confined Space during the work process, an employer must ensure it is provided and operated as needed. 11 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

12 4) If mechanical ventilation is required to maintain a safe atmosphere in the Confined Space, the employer must ensure that: a. The ventilation system incorporates a method of alerting workers to a failure of the system so that workers have sufficient time to safely leave the Confined Space, and Inerting b. All workers must evacuate a Confined Space or use an alternative means of protection if a ventilation system fails. 1) An employer must ensure that a Confined Space is inerted if it is not reasonably practicable to eliminate an explosive or flammable atmosphere within the Confined Space through another means. 2) If a Confined Space is inerted, an employer must ensure that: a. Every worker entering the Confined Space is equipped with supplied air respiratory protection equipment, b. All ignition sources are controlled, c. The atmosphere within the Confined Space stays inerted while workers are inside. ENTRY PERMIT SYSTEM The Entry Permit System contains several components; An Entry Tag which must be completed before any permit is issued for entry to a Confined Space, the Safe Work Permit for Entry, an Entry Log and specific Confined Space Signage. ENTRY TAG Before any permit is issued for entry to a Confined Space, an Entry Tag must be completed and hung at the entrance to the Confined Space by the equipment owner and will contain the following information as a minimum: a. Equipment number, identification or description, b. Entry level, c. Checks completed (gas tests, temperature, cleanliness, etc.), d. Frequency of subsequent tests, e. Personal protective equipment required for entry, f. Name and signature of tester, g. Date and time and results of all atmospheric tests, h. On the reverse of the tag the date, time and results of subsequent atmospheric tests will be recorded. 12 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

13 Confined Space Level 1 Entry Tag (Figure 5 & 6 ) a. A visually distinguishable Salmon Pink (Pantone 805) and White Level 1 Entry tag shall be used to identify the space as being Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH). Confined Space Level 2 & 3 Entry Tag (Figure 7 & 8 ) a. A Green and Yellow Safe Entry Tag shall be used. (See Appendix I) ENTRY PERMIT 1) A person must not enter a Confined Space without a valid entry permit. 2) An employer must establish an entry permit system for a Confined Space that: a. Maintains a list of the names of each worker who enters the Confined Space, b. Gives the location of the Confined Space, c. Specifies the time during which an entry permit is valid, d. Takes into account the work being done in the Confined Space, e. Takes into account the Code of Practice requirements for entering, being in and leaving a Confined Space, f. Ensures all required documents are collected and maintained for retention. 3) An employer must ensure that, before a worker enters a Confined Space, an entry permit is properly completed, signed by a competent person and a copy kept readily available at the Confined Space location. CONFINED SPACE TAGS & SIGNAGE Whenever an entrance to a Confined Space is left unattended 3 types of signs are used as indications of the status of the space and the requirements for entry. Do not allow Confined Space Entry Signs to be hung overlapping (except in the case of an emergency) or allow the signs to be attached to each other where they can inadvertently cover up a valid entry sign. Danger, Do Not Enter: (Figure 3 ) This sign overrides all other signs at entrances to Confined Spaces. When it is in place NO ONE is to enter the space under any circumstances. Operations personnel are the only personnel who are allowed to remove this sign. 13 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

14 This sign will be placed immediately upon opening the space by the equipment owner and if an event occurs that could compromise the conditions in a Confined Space. For Confined Space Level 1 entries the "DANGER, DO NOT ENTER" sign must be hung at the entrances every time the space is left unattended. For Confined Space Level 2 & 3 entries, a DANGER DO NOT ENTER sign must be hung at the entrance whenever the space is evacuated due to emergency. If entry is required into a Confined Space, Operations personnel must be contacted to evaluate the conditions of the Confined Space, test the atmosphere of the space, and remove the sign if everything meets the standards to enter and work. Confined Space Monitor and Permit Required for Entry: (Figure 2) Operations Personnel will hang a Confined Space Monitor and Permit Required for Entry Sign to signify that a space is safe to enter. People authorized to enter must have a valid Safe Work Entry Permit and a valid Safe Entry Tag are in place. There must be a Confined Space Monitor present at the entrance prior to entering. This sign can be removed by the Confined Space Monitor provided all the permit criteria are met and the Safe Entry Tag is valid and current. For Level 2 & 3 Confined Space entries, when the Confined Space is left unattended, provided the status of the Confined Space has not changed, this sign must be hung at the entrance by the Confined Space Monitor when leaving. Confined Space Required for Entry:(Figure 4 ) For Level 3 Confined Space entries where a Confined Space Monitor is not required, this sign must be hung by the Operations Personnel at the entrance to indicate that although there is a Safe Entry Tag on it, the space can only be entered with a valid Safe Work Entry Permit. 14 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

15 CONFINED SPACE MONITOR CONFINED SPACE LEVEL 1 & 2 ENTRY 1) For every Level 1 and 2 Confined Space Entry, a competent Confined Space Monitor will be assigned. 2) The Confined Space Monitor will: a. Hold valid Monitor Certification, b. Be deemed competent as a Confined Space Monitor by their employer, c. Be capable and equipped to summon rescue personnel, if required. A means of communication (See definition Appendix II) is mandatory, d. Be in communication or visual contact with personnel inside the Confined Space at all times, e. Initiate evacuation as necessary, and ensure proper signage is posted at the entrance(s) to the Confined Space, f. NEVER leave the entrance to the Confined Space with people inside unless properly relieved by another Certified Monitor, g. NEVER enter the Confined Space for any reason, h. NEVER become directly involved in any activity that distracts from the primary duty as a Confined Space Monitor. i. After verifying all personnel have exited the Confined Space, ensure correct signage is in place prior to leaving the Confined Space entrance(s) unattended (e.g. breaks and end of shift), j. Control the number of personnel allowed in the Confined Space, as identified by hazard assessment, k. Maintain a Confined Space Entry and Exit log (as per site specific requirements) for the duration of the job. The logs must be safely stored for record retention purposes, l. Ensure Entry and Exit points are kept clear and clean, m. Maintain awareness of potential hazards in the vicinity of the Confined Space that may affect the health and safety of the worker(s) inside, n. Be identified by wearing a blue Confined Space Monitor vest. CONFINED SPACE LEVEL 3 ENTRY Confined Space Level 3 Entries may require a Confined Space Monitor as determined by the hazard assessment. If a Confined Space Monitor is not deemed necessary a competent worker designated by the employer must be in communication with the worker(s) in a Confined Space. 15 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

16 CONFINED SPACE ENTRANT TRACKING For all Confined Space Level 1 and 2 entries, and when there is a Confined Space Monitor on a Level 3 entry, all personnel who enter the Confined Space will leave their ID Card outside the space. (I.e. clipped to the ring, board or cable, etc. provided at the entrance, so as to be conspicuously located at the entrance to the Confined Space). not possible, then they must return to their point of entry to retrieve their ID card and inform the Confined Space Monitor as soon as they exit the Confined Space. All Levels of Confined Spaces require the Entrant Tracking Log to be in place at the entrance to the Confined Space, and maintained for all entries. RETAINING RECORDS As per OH&S Part 5 Section 58 Retaining Records: An employer must ensure that all records with respect to entry and work in a Confined Space, including entry permits, safe entry tags and entry or exit logs are retained for not less than a. 1 year if no incident or unplanned event occurred during the entry, or b. 2 years if an incident or unplanned event occurred during the entry. CONFINED SPACE ENTRY SIGNAGE AND TAGGING SYSTEM 16 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

17 CONFINED SPACE MONITOR AND PERMIT REQUIRED FOR ENTRY Figure 2 17 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

18 Figure 3 18 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

19 CONFINED SPACE PERMIT REQUIRED FOR ENTRY Figure 4 19 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

20 Figure 5 20 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

21 Figure 6 21 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

22 Figure 7 22 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

23 Figure 8 23 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

24 SECTION 2 - RESTRICTED SPACE RESTRICTED SPACE The 2009 Edition of the OH&S Code has introduced the concept of a Restricted Space. As discussed below, Restricted Spaces and Confined Space share certain common characteristics. They differ however in key areas that may help employers and workers to operate more safely and efficiently. Like Confined Spaces, Restricted Spaces have a limited means of entry and exit. Entry points may not be designed for easy walk in. Other limitations include access by ladders or by stairways that provides poor access because of steep slope, narrow width or extreme length. Physical obstructions such as bulkheads, collapsed material, or machinery may impede exit. Limited means of entry and exit can make escape or rescue difficult. RESTRICTED SPACE DEFINITION A Restricted Space is an enclosed or partially enclosed space, not intended for continuous human occupancy that has a restricted, limited or impeded means of entry or exit because of its oilfield. All other hazards are either non-existent or have been eliminated or controlled as required by Part 2 of the OH & S Code. Note: Employers and workers must be mindful that a restricted space can become a Confined Space if conditions or work scope changes. IDENTIFYING A RESTRICTED SPACE (See Figure 1) 1) A location may be considered a Restricted Space if: a. It is determined by an approved hazard assessment that it is not a Confined Space, b. Entry does not require permitting or gas testing as designated by area work practices, c. No work or activities conducted within or within the vicinity of the restricted space will or have the potential to change the atmospheric conditions of the Restricted Space. PROTECTION HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ENERGY 1) An employer must ensure that any hazardous energy in a Restricted Space is controlled in accordance with Part 15 of the Alberta OH & S Code. 24 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

25 PERMITTING, ATMOSPHERIC TESTING AND TENDING WORKER REQUIREMENTS Part 5 of the Alberta OH & S Code states that Restricted Spaces are not subject to the permitting, atmosphere testing and tending worker requirements of a Confined Space, however; a. Restricted Space work must conform to safe work permit requirements for the specific work area, b. Atmospheric testing must conform to specific work area requirements in conjunction with the hazard assessment and area specific permitting requirements, c. A competent worker designated by the employer must be in communication with the worker(s) inside a restricted space and must have a suitable system for summoning assistance in the event of an incident or emergency as specified by the valid rescue plan (e.g. radio). (As per Working Alone Legislation and OH&S Part 28), d. A copy of the approved Restricted Space hazard assessment will be posted and readily accessible for review at the entrance to the Restricted Space. ADDITIONAL CONTROLS In addition, if a location has been identified as a Restricted Space, the following controls must be put in place for a Restricted Space Entry: a. An Evacuation Procedure including a documented communication process (as part of the approved Restricted Space hazard assessment) between entrants and a competent worker has been established b. A valid Rescue Plan. RETAINING RECORDS On HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES member sites the approved hazard assessment will be retained as per the individual HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES member company policy. It is the HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES s recommendation that these records are retained for a period not less than those specified as per the Confined Space Documentation Records Retention. 25 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

26 APPENDIX II DEFINITIONS DEFINITIONS 1. Accreditation or Accredited: authorization, in writing, from the HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES to be a Training Provider of a Safety Training Standard. Accreditation may be withdrawn by the HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES and at any time. In order to be a Safety Training Provider of a Standard, an Organization s Accreditation status must be current. 2. Senior Management: The Senior management members of HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES that provide, in writing, endorsement for initial documents and approval for any revisions or exceptions to a Safety Training Standard or Regional Code of Practice. 3. Communication System: an established method of communication between workers inside the Confined Space and the Confined Space Monitor, as well as between the Confined Space Monitor and the Emergency Response contact. Methods must be defined within the hazard assessment and may encompass but not limited to the following: Voice, hand signals (requires direct line of sight), radios, handheld mike phone, lights, cell phone or an air horn (e.g. Klaxon horn). 4. Competent Worker: (as per Alberta OH&S Code in relation to a person) adequately qualified, suitably trained and with enough relevant experience to safely perform work without supervision or with only a minimal degree of supervision. 5. Confined Space Monitor: a person defined in legislation as a tending worker adequately trained and certified, capable of summoning rescue assistance and assigned to remain on the outside of the Confined Space while maintaining communication with those working inside. 6. Evacuation Plan: a pre-determined plan to evacuate the Confined Space or Restricted Space should an alarm be activated, or if there is a significant change in or about the Confined Space or Restricted Space that would affect the health and safety of those people working in the Confined Space or Restricted Space. The Evacuation Plan shall be reviewed by all participants involved in a Confined Space or Restricted Space Entry. 7. Flammable (Explosive) Atmosphere: an atmosphere containing a flammable gas or vapour at a concentration between the lower explosive limit (LEL) and the upper explosive limit (UEL). 8. Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH): an oxygen deficient atmosphere or an atmospheric concentration of any harmful substance that poses an immediate threat to life or may cause irreversible or delayed adverse health effects or may interfere with an individual s ability to escape from a dangerous atmosphere. 9. Inerting: intentional displacement of the atmosphere by a non-reactive gas (such as nitrogen) to an extent that the resulting atmosphere is non-combustible (oxygen levels reduced below that needed to support combustion) but thereby creating an oxygen deficient atmosphere 26 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

27 10. Initial Entry: refers to the first entry, performed or directed by the area owner, into the Confined Space or Restricted Space to verify conditions and ensure the Confined Space or Restricted Space is safe for subsequent ongoing entries to perform work. i.e. the first time the equipment is opened for atmospheric testing. Does not refer to the first entry of each shift. 11. Isolation: a process whereby the Confined Space is removed from service and completely protected against the inadvertent release of material by the following: blanking/blinding, misaligned sections of all lines and pipes, a double block and bleed system, lockout of all sources of electrical power and nuclear devices, blocking or disconnecting all mechanical, pneumatic, hydraulic linkages and sources of potential stored energy. 12. Legislation: all municipal and local news, statues, ordinances, by-laws and regulations, orders, directives and decisions rendered by any ministry, department or administrative or regulatory agency relating in any way to the health and safety of workers in the Province of Alberta. 13. Lower Explosive Limit (LEL): the lower value of the range of concentrations of a substance, in a mixture with air, at which the substance may ignite. 14. Members: Include all operating companies under HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES 15. Occupational Exposure Limit(OEL): the maximum concentration of substances to which a person may be exposed for specific lengths of time as defined by relevant legislation. 16. OH&S Act, Regulation, and Code: the current Occupational Health and Safety Act, Regulation and Code of the Province of Alberta and includes all of the regulations passed under the Act from time to time. 17. Organization (s): includes any individual, corporation, partnership, firm joint venture, syndicate, association, government, governmental agency or board or commission or authority, and other forms of entity or organization. 18. Purging: the method by which gases, vapors or other airborne impurities are displaced from a Confined Space. 19. Regional Code of Practice (RCOP): a Code of Practice, endorsed by the HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES, governing the practices, procedures and safety training standards, to be followed at each of the HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES Owner respective sites. These codes can be amended by the HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES from time to time. Note: At any time should Legislation requirements change they shall take precedent over the Regional Code. 20. Rescue Plan: a plan developed that addresses rescue equipment, location of this equipment, Rescue Personnel requirements, and means of communication and implementation of rescue. 21. Restricted Space: an enclosed or partially enclosed space, not intended for continuous human occupancy that has a restricted, limited or impeded means of entry or exit because of its oilfield. 27 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

28 22. Standard: the minimum acceptable content requirements for a Training Provider s training program that is set out in an HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES Safety Training Standard, as amended by the HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES from time to time. 23. Training Provider: those Organizations that have received Accreditation status, in writing, from the HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES to provide a Safety Training Program. 24. Upper Explosive Limit (UEL): the higher value of the range of concentrations of a substance, in a mixture with air, at which the substance may ignite. 28 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

29 APPENDIX III - COMPETENCY GUIDE LINE FOR EMPLOYER USE Supervisors are encouraged to use this guide and any site specific policies and procedures as a base to check competency for employees performing CSM duties. This is not an all inclusive method for deeming of worker competency. 1. Are you a HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES certified Confined Space Monitor? Visually confirm certification. If the worker answers NO, supervisor must obtain another worker for the current job who is competent in the position. Steps must be taken to increase the initial workers competency such as worker re-training or mentorship. 2. Do you feel competent performing the task of Confined Space Monitor? If the worker answers NO, supervisor must obtain another worker for the current job who is competent in the position. Steps must be taken to increase the initial workers competency such as worker re-training or mentorship. 3. Have you performed Confined Space Monitor duties before? If so, when was the last time? 4. Are you aware that there are legal requirements for a Confined Space Monitor? Refer to OH&S 5. What basic equipment is required for this task? Supervisor to reference RCOP and Site Specific Standard. 6. How are you going to track entrants into the Confined Space? Supervisor to reference RCOP and Site Specific Standard. 7. What is your role in an emergency? a. How are you going to evacuate the Confined Space? b. How do you contact emergency personnel? c. Who meets emergency personnel? d. What do you do if there is a worker down in the Confined Space? e. Where are workers expected to go in an emergency? 8. How are you going to communicate with the workers in the Confined Space? See RCOP Appendix II 9. Name three (3) legitimate reasons to evacuate a Confined Space? 10. How do you safely leave your post in a non-emergency situation? 11. What signage must be posted when leaving the Confined Space at: a. Coffee break/ End of shift; b. Emergency evacuation if safe to do so 29 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

30 APPENDIX IV - COMPETENCY GUIDE LINE SIGN-OFF SHEET FOR EMPLOYERS APPENDIX IV CONFINED SPACE MONITOR COMPETENCY ASSESSMENT SIGN-OFF SHEET For use by Employer s to check competency levels of personnel assigned as a Confined Space Monitor, on HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES Member sites. Supervisor s Name: (Print) (Signature) Supervisor s Badge Number: Confined Space Monitor s Name: (Print) (Signature) Monitor s Badge Number: Date of Competency Check: (YYYY / MM / DD) Competent: Yes No Additional Training Required: (Specify if any requirements) 30 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

31 CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS 31 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

32 PURPOSE The purpose of this standard is to ensure where chemical and other harmful substances are present on a worksite; Workers are trained on the hazards, and Hazards are mitigated prior to workers being exposed. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Harmful substances are substances that because of their properties, the method they are used, or their presence can be dangerous to workers. This includes chemical substances which have an occupational exposures limit. 1) Hazard assessments will be conducted on work sites to determine the presence of chemical or other harmful substances. a. If a worker may be exposed to a harmful substance at a work site the Health and Safety Advisor will conduct a hazard assessment by: i. Identifying the health hazards associated with the exposure, and ii. Assessing the worker s exposure. b. No worker will be exposed to a substance listed in Schedule 1, Table 2 (See AB OHS Explanation Guide) at a concentration exceeding its ceiling limit at any time. 2) Control measures will be developed to mitigate the hazards associated with substances that have been identified. 3) Control measures will be implemented in the following order1; a. Engineering Controls b. Administrative Controls c. Personal Protective Equipment 4) Health hazards will be identified for harmful substances, and workers exposure to these types of substances will be assessed. 5) Workers are required to use procedures developed to reduce exposures2. EXPOSURE 1) The Health and Safety Advisor will ensure that a worker who may be exposed to a chemical hazard and/or harmful substance at a worksite: a. Is informed of the health hazards associated with exposure to that substance b. Is informed of measurements made of airborne concentrations of harmful substances at the work site, and c. Is trained in, and understand the procedures developed by the Company to minimize the worker s exposure to harmful substances. i. This will be done in accordance with Alberta OHS Code Part 29 WHMIS WORKER OVEREXPOSURE 1) Where a worker has been exposed to a substance above the occupational exposure limit the; a. Concentration of the substance will be determined, b. Cause and extent of the overexposure will be determined and explained to the worker, 32 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

33 c. The worker will be protected from any further exposure, and d. Other workers will be protected from being overexposed to the substance. CODES OF PRACTICE5 1) A code of practice will be developed for any substance at a work site listed in Schedule 1, Table 2 of the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code where; a. More than 10 kilograms of a substance is present in its pure form, or b. More than 10 kilograms of a substance, as part of a mixture, is present exceeding a concentration of 0.1 percent by weight or more. 2) Codes of practice will include procedures to prevent the uncontrolled release of a substance, and response procedures if there was an uncontrolled release. WORKSITE REQUIREMENTS 1) De-contamination facilities will be provided at work sites where workers may be contaminated by a harmful substance6. 2) Articles and clothing that are contaminated cannot be removed from the work site until they have been properly decontaminated6. 3) Emergency equipment will be readily accessible and provided as required at work sites where chemicals that are harmful to the skin or eyes are used7. ISN 4 a. If a worker is contaminated by a harmful substance at a work site, the Company will provide immediate access to emergency facilities, to include the following: i. Showers, ii. Baths, iii. Eye wash equipment, or iv. Other equipment appropriate for the potential level of exposure. 4) Workers are not allowed to eat, drink, or smoke in a worksite contaminated with a quantity of a harmful substance that could pose a health or safety hazard to the workers8. 5) Harmful substances will be used and stored in clearly labeled or marked storage containers, and segregated to prevent interaction of the substances9. 6) Specific requirements for worksites where asbestos, coal dust, silica, and lead are present are outlined in the ASBESTOS, SILICA, COAL DUST, AND LEAD REQUIREMENTS section. time exceeding any of the Occupational Exposure Limits (OEL) or other standards for worker exposure (where no OEL has been established). Exposure limits include; 8-hour Extended Work shift Limits 15-minute Ceiling limits Three times the OEL where no ceiling limit or 15-minute OEL have been established Multiple Substance Exposure Limits Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) Limits 33 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

34 2) Exposures to substances that may be harmful and do not have established limits will be kept as low as possible. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT 1) Measurements of concentrations at worksites will be taken where workers may be exposed to concentrations above the occupational exposure limit. 2) Airborne concentrations of substances with occupational exposure limits will be measured by a hygienist or other competent person using approved methods. 3) Continuous, direct reading instruments will be used to measure airborne concentrations where there is not an established and accepted analytical method or procedure. 4) Direct reading instruments will be used, calibrated, and maintained according to the manufacturer s specifications. 5) NIOSH method 7400 will be used for measuring fibre particles. 6) Measurement results will be kept for three years from the date they were taken. MULTIPLE EXPOSURES 1) Where workers may be exposed during a work shift to more than one substance, and the substances have similar toxicological effects and modes of action, the concentrations will not exceed; a. 1 as determined by the multiple exposures calculation, or b. An OEL for any single substance. EXTENDED WORK SHIFTS 2) Exposure limits for work shifts longer than eight hours will be determined using the adjusted exposure calculation. 3) Exposure limits do not have to be determined for extended work shifts for any substance listed in Schedule 1, Table 2 where the number 3 appears in Substance Interaction column SILICA AND COAL DUST REQUIREMENTS General Requirements 1) Controls will be put into place at worksites where silica or coal dust, are present to; a. Minimize the release of these substances from any process, and b. Reduce accumulation or contamination of these substances. Restricted Areas Worksites or areas of, where there is a reasonable chance that the airborne concentration of silica or coal dust could exceed the occupational exposure limit for any of the substances are categorized as restricted areas. Requirements of restricted areas are as follows; 34 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

35 Signage 1) Signs will be conspicuously posted at all entrances and periphery of restricted areas indicating; a. The substance present, b. That only authorized personnel may enter the area, and c. Eating, drinking, and smoking are prohibited. 2) The signs will remain posted until the area is no longer a restricted area. Personal Protective Equipment & Decontamination 1) Personal protective equipment that protects the worker and covers personal clothing will be provided to workers in a restricted area. 2) Workers will be decontaminated prior to leaving a restricted area, unless an emergency situation requires workers to be immediately removed from the area. 3) Personal protective clothing used in restricted areas containing asbestos and lead that is reused will be decontaminated by the appropriate laundering method. 4) Asbestos and lead containing clothing will be placed in placed in sealed containers with labels indicating; a. The contents, b. The contamination source (asbestos or lead), c. That the source is a hazard, and d. That the dust should not be inhaled. Where a worker has not or cannot recall a previous health assessment, they will be required to undergo a health assessment. Medical Assessments 1) Workers who have undergone health assessments, medical monitoring, or tests as a result of exposures to these substances will be informed of the results. 2) All results will remain confidential, outside of authorized persons, unless a worker provides written permission otherwise. 3) A Director of Medical Services will be notified in writing of any worker examined by a physician who is affected with or suffering from a notifiable disease as outlined by Part 1 General of the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Regulation 4) The costs associated with health assessments, including travel to and from, are the responsibility of HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES Energies. 5) Missed wages, salary, or other benefits will not be deducted from a worker s pay while they are undergoing any medical procedure. 6) Where possible assessments, monitoring, and testing will be conducted during normal working hours. Health Assessments 1) Personnel working who may be exposed 30 days or more in a year to silica or coal dust will undergo a health assessment; a. Within 30 days of becoming exposed, and b. Every two years thereafter. 2) Workers, previously exposed at another place of employment, are responsible to inform HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES Energies of the approximate date of health assessments conducted within the previous two years. 35 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

36 3) Health assessments will; a. Contain all information required by Part 4, Section 40 (2) of the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code, and b. Be documented and retained for a minimum of 30 years. 4) The results of the assessment will be interpreted and provided to the employee within 60 days of the tests being completed. SILICA28 During abrasive blasting crystalline silica will be substituted with a less harmful product when possible. BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS The purpose of this standard is to ensure; 1. Workers are provided instruction on the health hazards and precautionary measures associated with exposures to biological hazards, and 2. Biological hazards present at work sites are identified and mitigated. EXPLANATION Biological hazards can arise from exposures to such things as mosquitoes, sewage, bodily fluids, mold, and rodents and pests. Although Occupational Exposure Limits are not established for biological hazards they present a hazard to workers, and measures must be put in place to reduce or eliminate workers exposure. REQUIREMENTS 1. Biological hazards will be identified through the Hazard Assessment Process1. a. If a worker may be exposed to a harmful substance at a work site the Health and Safety Advisor will conduct a hazard assessment by: i. Identifying the health hazards associated with the exposure, and ii. Assessing the worker s exposure. b. No worker will be exposed to a substance listed in Schedule 1, Table 2 (See AB OHS Explanation Guide) at a concentration exceeding its ceiling limit at any time. 2. Based on hazard assessment finding, control strategies will be implemented to mitigate the hazards through elimination, engineering controls, administrative controls, and personal protective equipment. 3. Health hazards associated with the biological hazards will be identified, and worker exposures will be assessed. 4. The Health and Safety Advisor will ensure that a worker who may be exposed to a biological hazard and/or harmful substance at a worksite: a. Is informed of the health hazards associated with exposure to that substance b. Is informed of measuremen ts made of airborne concentratio ns of harmful substances at the work site, and c. Is trained in, and understand the procedures 36 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

37 developed by the Company to minimize the worker s exposure to harmful substances. i. This will be done in accordance with Alberta OHS Code Part 29 WHMIS 5. Workers are required to use procedures developed to reduce exposures. EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT REQUIREME NTS 1) Emergency equipment will be readily accessible and provided as required at work sites where hazards that are harmful to the skin or eyes are used. a. If a worker is contaminate d by a harmful substance at a work site, the Company will provide immediate access to emergency facilities, to include the following: i. Showers, ii. Baths, iii. Eye wash equipment, or iv. Other equipment appropriate for the potential 37 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

38 level of exposure. BIOLOGICAL HAZARD REFERENCE Source Possible Hazard Control Rodents Hanta Virus Elimination of rodent habitats, food sources, and entry into facilities. Humans Bacterial or viral infection Reduction in work force Proper hygiene practices (i.e. hand washing), hand washing facilities, decontamination (i.e. surface cleaning), Pandemic protocol, and education of workers. Mold (Fungus) Illness Ventilation and reduction of moisture in facilities. Environmental Allergies (i.e. Bee stings) Allergic Reactions (i.e. Anaphylactic Shock) Worker awareness Mosquitoes West Nile Virus Elimination of stagnant water and provision of insect repellents. Wildlife Injury Work standards, education of workers, elimination of food sources, and provision of safety equipment (i.e. bear bangers and communication devices) 38 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

39 CRANES, HOISTS AND LIFTING DEVICES 39 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

40 PURPOSE The purpose of this standard is to ensure that hoisting and lifting devices with a rated load capacity of 2000 kg or more are Operated by competent personnel, demonstrating competency in operating the device, including, where relevant, the following: - Operating the lifting device in a proper, safe, controlled, and smooth manner in accordance with the manufacturer s specifications - Reading and understanding lift plans - Maintaining the equipment log book and the operator s log book - Selecting the appropriate boom, jib and crane configuration to meet lift requirements and determine the net lifting capacity of this configuration - Determining the number of parts of line required - Thoroughly understanding the information in the operating manual and understanding the device s limitations - Knowing, understanding and properly using the load charts - Inspecting the lifting device and performing daily maintenance as required by the manufacturer s specifications or by the employer - Checking that all hazards have been identified - Shutting down and securing the device when it is unattended, and - Understanding and using hand signals for hoisting operations Operated in a manner which protects the safety of personnel, facilities, and other assets, and Maintained in accordance with the manufacturer s specifications and applicable standards. No worker other than the competent worker authorized by this company may operate a lifting device. Before operating a particular lifting device, the operator will be familiar with all recent entries in its log book. Lifting Devices in this standard apply to; Boom & Picker Trucks Hand-Operated Hoists Material Hoists Overhead cranes EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS All equipment will be maintained, repaired, modified, and operated in accordance with the manufacturer s specifications, and the standards applicable to each type of equipment. Overhead Cranes in accordance with CAN/CSA-B (R2007) Safety Standard for Maintenance and Inspection of Overhead Cranes, Gantry Cranes, Monorails, Hoists and Trolleys, C Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1, Section 40, and C22.2 No. 33-M1984 (R2004) Oilfield and Test of Electric Cranes and Hoists Boom Trucks and Personnel Baskets in accordance with CAN/CSA-Z (R2004) Safety Code on Mobile Cranes Material Hoists in accordance with CAN/CSA-Z256-M87 (R2006) Safety Code for Material Hoists 40 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

41 Hand-Operated Hoists6 in accordance AB OHS Code 2009, Part 6 Where equipment is not commercially manufactured it will be certified and maintained, under the direction of a certified professional engineer. MAINTENANCE AND MODIFICATIONS Structural repairs and modifications of components of lifting components will be; a) Conducted under the direction and control of a professional engineer, b) Certified by a professional engineer, c) Repaired or restored to not less than the original capacity, and d) Identified in the equipment s log book and on the component which was repaired or modified. 41 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

42 EXAMPLE OF A LOAD CHART 42 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

43 INSPECTIONS Inspections must be conducted on all hoisting and lifting equipment, associated lifting components (ex. Personnel basket), and rigging at scheduled intervals. These inspections are used as a means to ensure that no defects are present that affect the integrity or the lifting capacity of the equipment Inspection requirements are as follows; Daily the equipment operator will inspect the hoisting and lifting equipment, associated equipment, and rigging. Excluding hand-operated hoists, the inspection of the hoisting and lifting equipment is to be based on the log book criteria and documented in the equipment s log book. The inspections of hand-operated hoists are to be based on the criteria of the Equipment Inspection form. Monthly supervisors will inspect all hoisting and lifting equipment as part of the inspection program. The inspection of the hoisting and lifting components of the equipment will be based on the log book criteria and documented in the equipment s log book. Annually all boom and picker trucks and personnel baskets will undergo non-destructive testing for all load bearing components under the direction and control of a professional engineer in accordance with the manufacturer s specifications. After modifications or repair equipment will be inspected to ensure all components are functioning properly. Non-destructive testing will be conducted after repairs or modifications to load bearing components of boom or picker trucks or to personnel baskets. The following requirements apply to all lifting devices included in this standard unless specifically stated otherwise HOISTING AND LIFTING EQUIPMENT 1. All major structural, mechanical, and electrical components will be permanently and legibly marked with the specific make and model of the lifting device. 2. An identification plate or weatherproof label will permanently and legibly display the; a. Manufacturer s rated load capacity. b. Manufacturer s name, and c. Model, serial number, and year of manufacture or shipment date. ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT 1. Containers used for hoisting must be used for the purpose of which they were designed and marked with the maximum load rating. 2. Drums or similar containers can only be used for hoisting a load if it is hoisted in a cage that is designed for that purpose. 3. A-frames or gin poles; a. Cannot be inclined more than 45 degrees from the vertical, b. Are equipped with a boom stop, and c. The sheave cap of the rigging (for both A-frames and gin poles) will be securely attached to ensure the equipment will be able to withstand any load that the assembly may be subject to. 43 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

44 4. Suspended personnel baskets (man baskets) must be erected, used, and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer s specifications or designed and certified by a professional engineer. 5. Personnel in suspended personnel baskets must be provided; a. A vertical lifeline for each person in the basket, OR, where this cannot be achieved, b. A secondary support line must be attached between the personnel basket and the hoist line above the hook assembly, and each worker must be wearing a personal fall arrest system OPERATING STANDARDS 1. Operators are responsible for the safety of other personnel involved in a hoisting or lifting operation. a. If the operator has any doubts as to the safety of the lift, the operator will cease operations until the condition is made safe. This company will ensure that work is arranged, if it is reasonably practicable, so that a load does not pass over workers. Planning for a lift process will include: i. The type of load and its rigging requirements ii. Whether the load might drift, fall freely, or be released unintentionally iii. Whether the lifting device might strike workers, and iv. Whether the lifting device might fail or fall over 2. A procedure will be developed when the job scope requires more than one lifting device to be present in a work area and there is the potential for a collision between the lifting devices, their loads or component parts. 44 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

45 3. All rigging will be chosen, inspected, and used in accordance with OHS Code Part 21, Rigging. 4. The weight of an object being hoisted will be provided prior to a hoisting operation. 5. When the weight of an object to be hoisted is not known a means of determining the weigh will be provided. 6. Lift calculations must be conducted for all lifts exceeding 75% of the rated capacity of a boom truck, picker truck, or overhead crane. 7. Personnel are not allowed under suspended loads and loads cannot be passed or held over personnel. 8. Tag lines must be used to control a load where lifting, lowering, or moving a load could endanger a worker. Tag lines must; a. Not create a more hazardous situation. b. Be made of non-conductive materials where there is possibility of contact with energized electrical equipment. c. Used in a manner that creates a separation between the worker holding the tag line, and prevents the load from striking the worker. 9. Operators of equipment that is operated by remote control will be visually distinguished differently than others on a worksite COMMUNICATION Clear communication must be maintained between personnel involved in a hoisting operation. The operator s movements must be guided using either radios or designated hand signals throughout the entire job. Where radios are used the potential for explosive atmospheres must be assessed. Only intrinsically safe radios may be used where there is a potential for an explosive atmosphere. Where hand signals are used a competent signaller will be designated. Additional signallers will be designated in situations where one signalperson is not sufficient enough to transmit signals to the operator. Signallers must wear a high visibility vest, arm gauntlet, or client-specific method of identification while directing the equipment operator. Prior to giving a signal, the signaller must verify that the hazards in the area are controlled and the move can be safely executed. To avoid confusion only one designated signaler will give signals at a time, unless it is the STOP signal, which will be accepted from anyone on the worksite. 45 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

46 EQUIPMENT SPECIFIC STANDARDS Hand Operated Hoists 1. Personnel will undergo a training and competency assessment period, and be deemed competent, prior to being authorized to use a material hoist 2. Hoists must be capable of suspending the total load under all operating conditions 46 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

47 Material Hoist 1. Personnel will undergo a training and competency assessment period, and be deemed competent, prior to being authorized to operating a material hoist. 2. Log books must be maintained for all material hoists. Refer to Log Books Guideline Section 49.1 for further details. 3. Personnel are not allowed to ride on material hoists. 4. Each floor or level where a material hoist is operated will be equipped with devices that prevent the landing gate from opening unless the hoist is positioned at the landing or movement of the hoist when the landing gate is opened. 5. The operator must remain at the hoist controls while the skip, platform or load is in the lifted position. 6. The skip, platform, or cage cannot be moved unless the designated signaler has signaled to the operator that it is safe to proceed. 7. Signals a. Signal descriptions must be posted at each floor or level and at the operator s station, b. The operator and signaler must maintain visual or auditory communication at all times while loading or unloading on each floor or level, and c. Electronic or mechanical signaling systems used to coordinate movements of the hoist s skip, platform or cage must indicate which floor or level the signal is coming from. d. For buildings more than 20 metres high a signal system must be installed at each floor or level and at the operators station and allow for voice communication between the worker on any floor and the operator. 47 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

48 8. Braking systems will be capable of safely stopping the total suspended load at all times 9. The base of the material hoist must be barricaded to prevent anyone from entering the hoist platform when it is not at the base level. 10. Removable guardrails or gates will be installed between 600 millimeters and 900 millimeters away from the edge of each floor or level the hoist is used at. 11. Overhead protection will be provided for any material hoists without the capability to be remotely operated Boom and Picker Trucks 1. Personnel operating equipment that requires a professional trade certification are required to have; a) A Certification accepted by the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board, b) Be an apprentice in the applicable apprenticeship program, or c) Have filed an application to participate in the trade 2. Personnel will undergo a training and competency assessment period, and be deemed competent, prior to being authorized to boom or picker trucks. 3. Log books must be maintained for all boom and picker trucks. Refer to Log Books Guideline Section 49.1 for further details. 4. Boom trucks will be equipped with load charts identifying the rated load capacity at the permitted boom angles and boom radio. 5. Outriggers must be fully extended and placed on solid footings (pads or floats) when in use. All trucks are equipped with pads or floats that are of adequate size, strength, and rigidity 6. Warning devices must be activated, where not automatic, when a boom or picker is in motion. 7. The sound of auditory warning devices will be distinctly different than other sounds associated with the truck or worksite. 8. All booms are equipped with positive boom stops and boom stop limiting devices, and jib stop devices (where applicable). 9. Installation, removal, or replacement of a boom will be conducted by a certified sub-contractor with procedures in place that prevent upset or collapse of the boom 10. Work conducted around overhead power lines will be conducted in accordance with HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES Overhead Power Line Standard, the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code Part 17 Overhead Power Lines, and the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code, Schedule 4 Safe Limit of Approach Distances 48 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

49 Overhead Cranes 1. Log books must be maintained for all overhead cranes. Refer to Log Books Guideline Section 49.1 for further details. 2. Personnel will undergo a training and competency assessment period, and be deemed competent, prior to being authorized to operating overhead cranes. 3. Overhead cranes will60; a. Have a positive boom stop or limiting device on the crane or on the rails, tracks, or trolleys, b. Be equipped with an overspeed limiting device, c. Have a positive means of ensuring that the rails, tracks, or trolleys cannot spread or misalign, d. Have sweep guards to prevent material on the rail, track, or trolley from dislodging the crane, and e. Have a bed designed to carry all anticipated loads. 4. The controls of all overhead cranes will be constant manual pressure type 49 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

50 Contracto rs Workers Superviso r s Manage ment HSE Advisor Senior Manage Frequenc y / year HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES HEALTH AND SAFETY MANUAL Activity Responsibility Ensure Hoisting and lifting standards are being followed 36 5 X Conduct daily inspections of hoisting equipment 36 X 5 Ensure daily inspections are being completed 12 X Conduct planned monthly inspections 12 X Ensure monthly inspections are being completed 12 X Ensure requirements for maintenance, 12 X X X modification, and repair are being followed Schedule Non-destructive testing 1 X Track inspections, repairs and modification 12 X X Inventory equipment and conduct gap analysis to determine whether additional standards are required 4 X Review results of audit and implement action where required 4 X 50 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

51 ERGONOMICS AND MATERIAL HANDLING 51 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

52 PURPOSE Ergonomics One of the main goals of designing effective, safe work systems and processes is to avoid the development of musculoskeletal injuries or discomfort associated with work. Our company would like to decrease the incidents of repetitive strain injuries (RSI s) and other musculoskeletal disorders by educating all employees how to properly set up their workstation and how to recognize and address the early signs of an injury. Other factors to consider include proper lighting, noise levels, temperature and humidity, stress levels and workload. Lifting / Handling Loads Loads, if lifted or handled improperly, can cause serious musculoskeletal injuries including sprains and strains and even fractures from dropped loads. In keeping with our company s policies regarding a safe working environment for all staff, policies and procedures have been developed to minimize or eliminate injuries from lifting or handling of loads. POLICY Ergonomics Each department is responsible for monitoring their workplace and identifying a condition or reported symptom that could result in an RSI. If a condition, reported symptom, or RSI occurs, the following actions shall be taken: Conduct a Worksite Evaluation: Each job, process or operation shall be evaluated to determine the actions that contributed to the condition, reported symptom, or injury Control or Eliminate Exposure: Any task or action that caused the condition, reported symptom, or RSI shall be modified; or if unable to modify, minimized to reduce or eliminate the cause of injury. Engineering controls, such as workstation or tool redesign; and administrative controls, such as job task rotation, work pacing or task breaks, shall be considered Lifting / Handling Loads All affected workers will be trained in specific measures to eliminate or reduce the possibility of musculoskeletal injury. Training includes: Identification of factors that could lead to a musculoskeletal injury The early signs and symptoms of musculoskeletal injury and their potential health effects Preventative measures including, where applicable, the use of altered work procedures, mechanical aids, and personal protective equipment Before a worker manually lifts, lowers, pushes, pulls, carries, handles or transports a load that could injure the worker, a risk assessment must be performed that considers: 52 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

53 The weight, size and shape of the load The physical condition of the person handling the load The number of times the load will be moved The manner in which the load will be moved (the position of the body while performing the lift, load distance from body, twisting, etc.) If a worker reports to a manager what the worker believes to be work related symptoms of a musculoskeletal injury, the manager must promptly review the activities of that worker and of other workers doing similar tasks to identify work-related causes of the symptoms, if any, and take corrective measures to avoid further injuries if the causes of the symptoms are work related. PROCEDURE Lifting / Handling Loads Where reasonably practicable, appropriate equipment for lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling, carrying, handling or transporting heavy or awkward loads will be provided and used. ISN 2 If the equipment provided is not reasonably practicable in a particular circumstance or for a particular heavy or awkward load, the manager or supervisor must take all practicable means to: Adapt the load to facilitate lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling, carrying, handling or transporting the load without injuring workers, or Otherwise minimize the manual handling required to move the load. Proper lifting methods are especially important when lifting objects from a position below arm s length or away from the front/midline of the body. Workers should avoid manually lifting anything over 23 kg (50 pounds) without assistance 53 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

54 ERGONOMICS Any computer workstation setup should be evaluated and optimized to make the user ergonomically comfortable. Types and positions of monitors, keyboards, input devices such as a mouse or trackballs, chair, and worktable all interrelate with the operator and the room environment. The following guidelines are general in nature and can be used in self-evaluation. If concerns arise, an ergonomist may need to assess the workplace. 1. Use a chair that gives you good lower back support and seat cushioning and can be adjusted for height. 2. Elbows should be at ~90 with upper arms hanging as vertically as much as possible. 3. Wrists should be level and slightly higher than the keyboard. Wrists supports are an excellent proactive tool to help minimize awkward wrist positions and may be used to rest the wrist upon when inactive. 4. Keyboard and mouse or trackball should be at the same level. The mouse/trackball should be placed adjacent to the keyboard to prevent reaching and leaning over. 5. Keep your thighs parallel to the floor and your feet flat on the floor or a footrest. 6. Keep your head upright and in a comfortable position. For typical users, the top of the computer display should ideally be the same height as the operator s eye height. The recommended downward viewing angle is 15 below horizontal. Maintain a comfortable viewing distance; 18 to 54 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

55 24 is optimal for most people. If the computer operator uses bifocal glasses, consider obtaining alternative focal distance glasses for computer usage. 7. Position your display to avoid glare or reflections. It is also advisable for operators to take frequent micro-breaks when keyboarding or mousing for extended periods. Wrists: With your hands held in front of you, palms down, fingers in an outward, relaxed position, gently circle your wrists inward and then outward, 10 times in each direction. Fingers: First clench both fists and hold for 5 seconds. Then spread fingers as far as you can and hold for 5 seconds. Relax and repeat 5 times. 55 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

56 FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARDS 56 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

57 POLICY Good housekeeping is essential in the prevention of fires. Fires can start anywhere and at any time. This is why it is important to know which fire extinguisher to use and how to use it. Always keep fire extinguishers visible and easy to get at. Fire extinguishers have to be properly maintained to do the job. Where temperature is a factor, ensure that care is taken in selecting the right fire extinguisher. TYPES OF FIRES Class A These fires consist of wood, paper, rags, rubbish, and other ordinary combustible materials. Recommended Extinguisher's: Water from a hose, pump type water can, or pressurized extinguisher, and soda acid extinguishers. Fighting the Fire: Soak the fire completely - even the smoking embers. Class B Flammable liquids, oil and grease Recommended Extinguisher's: ABC units, dry chemical, foam, and carbon dioxide extinguishers. Fighting the Fire: Start at the base of the fire and use a swinging motion from left to right, always keeping the fire in front of you. Class C Electrical equipment Recommended Extinguisher's: Carbon dioxide and dry chemical (ABC units) extinguishers. Fighting the Fire: Use short bursts on the fire. When the electrical current is shut off on a Class C fire, it can become a Class A fire if the materials around the electrical fire are ignited. FIRE PREVENTION DO S AND DONT S 1. Open fires are usually prohibited at all worksites. This includes outdoor fires and fires in cans or buckets within buildings. The Project Superintendent may authorize exceptions to this rule. 2. Remove rubbish, debris, and useless materials out of the work area as fast as they accumulate. 3. Know the location of firefighting equipment, fire alarms, and telephones that can be used in case of an emergency. 4. Throw away oily, greasy, or paint-soaked rags into metal receptacles provided with lids. 5. Keep the areas around stored lumber, combustible materials, and wooden frame buildings free from weeds and brush 6. Do not leave rubbish fires unattended. 57 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

58 7. Have a fire extinguisher handy when cutting or welding. Do NOT drop hot metal or slag on combustible materials. 8. Do not use gasoline or kerosene to start fires. Store these liquids in approved containers in isolated areas. Use only non-sparking tools when opening containers of flammable liquids. 9. Salamander type heaters used for heating concrete during cold weather should rest on a solid base of non-combustible material. Keep them away from forms and the heated enclosure. Nearby tarpaulins should be made of fire-resistant material. 10. Do not use temporary heating devices inside vessels or other confined places. Horrible incidents have resulted from this practice. Heat these places with propane heaters which draw fresh air from outside. The appropriate heating device required MUST be addressed on the Confined Space Entry Permit. 11. Before igniting any heating device, ensure the fuel system has been leak tested. 12. Shut off the power sources before attempting to put out an electrical fire. 13. Use a carbon dioxide or dry chemical multi-purpose extinguisher for electrical fires. Never use water on an electrical fire without the electrical supervisor's permission. 14. If you discover a fire, size it up fast. If it's small and the proper fire extinguisher is nearby, put it out. 15. If a fire is too much for you to handle, send someone to report it immediately. TRANSPORTING FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS / PROPANE Transportation Do s and Don ts: 1. Gasoline or other highly flammable liquids MUST NOT be carried in the passenger compartment of a vehicle. 2. Gasoline or other flammable liquids must be transported and stored in approved containers bearing the CSA or ULC insignia. 3. All flammable liquid containers and propane tanks must be transported in an upright position, adequately braced or secured in some manner to prevent overturning. 4. When transporting gasoline or other flammable liquids in a van, place the containers in the rear of the van and provide adequate ventilation. Containers/Tanks Ensure that the containers and tanks are regularly inspected for damage and that all caps and fittings are secured after filling. 58 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

59 Extinguishers Ensure that a minimum ABC fire extinguisher is provided in the vehicle that is transporting any gasoline or other flammable liquids. This extinguisher must be readily accessible to the driver. Storage 1. Do not transport gasoline, propane, or other flammable liquids near a source of heat or ignition. 2. Unless specifically designed for horizontal use, always transport or store propane bottles in an upright position. Materials 1. Use only approved hoses and fittings to connect propane bottles or tanks to equipment. 2. Face safety relief valves on bottles so they point away from sources of heat. CORRECT USE OF CLEANING SOLVENTS AND FLAMMABLES Cleaning solvents are used in our day-to-day oilfield work to clean tools and equipment. Special care must be taken to protect all workers from hazards which may be created from the use of these liquids. Whenever possible, solvents should be non-flammable and non-toxic. The foreman must be aware of all solvents/flammable that are used on the job and be sure that all workers who use these materials have been instructed in their proper use and on any hazard they pose. The following instructions or rules shall apply when solvents/flammable are used: 1. Use non-flammable solvents for general cleaning. 2. When flammable liquids are used, make sure that no hot work is permitted in that work area. 3. Store flammables and solvents in special storage areas. 4. Check toxic hazards of all the solvents before use. Refer to the MSDS. 5. Provide adequate ventilation where all solvents and flammables are being used. 6. Use goggles or face shields to protect the face and eyes from splashes or sprays. 7. Use rubber gloves to protect the hands. 8. Wear protective clothing to prevent contamination of workers' clothing. 9. When breathing hazards exist, use the appropriate respiratory protection. 10. Never leave solvents in open tubs or vats - return them to storage drums and tanks. 11. Ensure that proper containers are used for transportation, storage, and field use of solvents/flammables. 12. Where solvents are controlled products, ensure all employees using or in the vicinity of use or storage are trained and certified in the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System. Ensure all WHMIS regulations are met. In compliance with AB OHS Code Part 10, Sec 163 (2) HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES requires: that flammable substances stored or used at the work area, (a) will not be in sufficient quantity to produce an explosive atmosphere if inadvertently released, (b) are not stored within 30 metres of an underground shaft, (c) are not stored in the immediate vicinity of the air intake of (i) a ventilation supply system, (ii) an internal combustion engine, or (iii) the fire box of a fired heater or furnace, and (d) are stored only in 59 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

60 containers approved to (i) CSA Standard B376-M1980 (R2008), Portable Containers for Gasoline and Other Petroleum Fuels (or current version) In compliance with AB OHS Code Part 10, Sec 164 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES requires: That if a worker s clothing is contaminated with a flammable or combustible liquid, the worker must: (a) avoid any activity where a spark or open flame may be created or exists, (b) remove the clothing at the earliest possible time, and (c) ensure that the clothing is decontaminated before it is used again. If a worker s skin is contaminated with a flammable or combustible liquid, the worker must wash the skin at the earliest possible time. In compliance with AB OHS Code Part 10, Sec 162 (1) HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES requires: That if a person must not enter or work at a work area if more than 20 percent of the lower explosive limit of a flammable or explosive substance is present in the atmosphere. Atmospheric testing results should be assessed before a worker is exposed. In Compliance with AB OHS Code Part 10, Sec 163 (2) HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES requires that: Flammable substances stored or used at the work area, (a) will not be in sufficient quantity to produce an explosive atmosphere if inadvertently released, (b) are not stored within 30 metres of an underground shaft, (c) are not stored in the immediate vicinity of the air intake of (i) a ventilation supply system, (ii) an internal combustion engine, or (iii) the fire box of a fired heater or furnace, and (d) are stored only in containers approved to (i) CSA Standard B376-M1980 (R2008), Portable Containers for Gasoline and Other Petroleum Fuels (or current version). In Compliance with AB OHS Code Part 10, Sec 166 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES requires that: An internal combustion engine in a hazardous location has a combustion air intake and exhaust discharge that are:(a) equipped with a flame arresting device, or (b) located outside the hazardous location. An employer must ensure that all the surfaces of an internal combustion engine that are exposed to the atmosphere in a hazardous location are: (a) at a temperature lower than the temperature that would ignite a flammable substance present in the hazardous location, or (b) shielded or blanketed in such a way as to prevent any flammable substance present in the hazardous location from contacting the surface 60 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

61 EXCAVATION, TRENCHING AND GROUND DISTURBANCE 61 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

62 POLICY To inform workers that may be involved in the undertaking of excavation and ground disturbance of the requirements adopted by our company to ensure this work is done safely and according to current legislation and industry practices. WHAT IS EXCAVATION OR GROUND DISTURBANCE For the purposes of this procedure a Ground Disturbance shall be defined as: 1. Any excavation or oilfield activity that involves the use of powered mechanical equipment to any depth, with the following exceptions: a. road grading on established roadways b. grading of open areas and laydown areas, for the purpose of removing wheel ruts and footprints from the ground surface c. use of hydrovac 2. Any manual surface penetration to a depth of 30 cm or greater with the exception of manual digging using shovels only (picks or crowbars must not be used because of the potential to penetrate piping or electrical cables). COMPETENT WORKER A competent person will be responsible for the soil classifying and stabilization process. PRIOR TO COMMENCEMENT Before beginning any activity that would constitute excavation or ground disturbance, the site supervisor, project supervisor or project manager must do everything reasonable to locate any buried facilities or rights of way that may be affected during this project. This includes but is not limited to the surveying and marking of the dig zone (physical area in which the work is to be completed) and search area (30m each direction from the edge of the dig zone) location of any buried facility or right of way in these areas and the notification of all owners of any buried facilities. CROSSING AGREEMENTS Signed and dated Crossing Agreements will be obtained prior to work commencing on any portion of a project where a dig zone comes within 5 metres of a right of way or buried facility should no right of way be present. Crossing Agreements will be kept on site with other relevant documentation such as an Excavation & Ground Disturbance Permit, Emergency Response Plan, etc. EXCAVATION AND GROUND DISTURBANCE PERMITS The project manager or designate responsible for the site will issue an Excavation & Ground Disturbance Permit only when: 1. The dig zone has been surveyed and marked. 2. The search area has been surveyed and marked. 3. Facility and land owners have been notified and permissions have been granted 4. Crossing Agreements are in place. 62 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

63 5. All parties involved are satisfied that the work can be performed without risk to workers, surrounding population or the environment. EXCAVATION MARKING The Company will ensure that the workers are made aware of the excavation by utilizing the following: Flagging / marking Barricades utilizing: aligned concrete blocks, erected snow fencing, guardrails, piles and/or total enclosure/hoarding, etc. WORKER ACCESS The Company will ensure workers are provided with a safe means of entering/exiting an excavation by utilizing any of the following: mechanical device(s), ladder, scaffold, ground sloping, etc. The Company will ensure that workers will: not enter a trench that is deeper than 1.5 metres (4 feet 10 inches), and Work closer to the wall than the depth of the excavation [unless the excavation/wall is cut back properly and/or protected by either a temporary protective structure or a trench box/cage (designed by a professional engineer)]. LINE STRIKES Without fail in the event of any type of line strike, work must be stopped and the owner of the affected facility notified of the location and nature of the strike. The site supervisor must also contact his or her supervisor. A line strike is defined as any contact with a buried facility that results in any damage to that facility including a dent, gouge, bend or scrape in the facility or any damage to the outer protective coating of the facility. BURIED FACILITIES The Company will ensure that prior to the ground being disturbed the Company will contact Albert 1-Call ( ), for clearances and to locate buried electrical, gas, communication and other underground facilities. The Company will ensure that the ground will not be disturbed until buried facilities have been identified and their locations marked. The Company will ensure that only methods of hand exposure (i.e. hand digging, non-destructive technique acceptable to the owner, or the equivalent, etc.) are utilized in the hand expose zone of a buried facility, until it has been exposed to sight (no mechanical excavation will take place in the hand expose zone). MECHANICAL EXCAVATION LIMITATIONS There will be no mechanical excavation within 5 meters of an unexposed facility or within 1 meter of an exposed facility 63 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

64 WORKER PROTECTION The Company will ensure that prior to any worker commencing work in an excavation (more than 1.5 metres deep and closer to the wall or bank than the depth of the excavation) that the worker is protected by cutting back the walls, installing temporary protective structures, and/or the equivalent. CUTTING BACK WALLS The Company will ensure the walls are cut back safely as to ensure: Soil classified as hard and compact will have walls that are sloped within 1.5 metres of the bottom (of the excavation) at an angle not less than 30 degrees measured from the vertical Soil classified as likely to crack or crumble will have walls that are sloped within 1.5 metres of the bottom (of the excavation) at an angle not less than 45 degrees measured from the vertical Soil classified as soft, sandy or loose will have walls that are sloped from the bottom (of the excavation) at an angle not less than 45 degrees measured from the vertical. SPOIL PILES The Company will ensure that a spoil pile is piled so that it is at least one metre away from the edge of the excavation, at an angle of not more than 45 degrees from the horizontal, and any loose materials are scaled and trimmed away. TRENCHING A trench is an excavation with one special feature: it is deeper than it s width at the bottom. SAFE ENTRY AND EXIT The Company will ensure that should a worker be required to enter a trench that is more than 1.5 metres deep, 1. A safe point of entering and exiting will be provided and located not more than 8 metres from the worker. 2. The trench will be sloped so that the worker can reach the safe point. TRAINING All company employees and contractors working in relation to a ground disturbance must possess Ground Disturbance Level II Certification from Global Training Centre. CONTACT INFORMATION (First Call Services) Alberta HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

65 REFERENCES 1. Alberta Pipeline Act and Regulations 2. The Edmonton Area Pipeline and Utility Operators Committee Safe Procedures for Pipeline and Utility Crossings 3. Occupational Health and Safety Code, Part HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

66 66 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

67 HYDRGEN SULPHIDE (H2S) 67 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

68 PURPOSE Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) gas is one of the most deadly hazards in the oil and gas industry. It goes by many names such as H2S, sour gas, sewer gas, hydro sulfuric acid and sulphureted hydrogen. Found in formations that are being drilled for oil the gas is formed by decomposition of organic matter containing sulfur. The fact that the gas is formed through decomposition means that it can also be present in tank bottoms, sewer and/or water basins and or containment systems. Hydrogen Sulfide is a highly toxic, colorless and combustible gas (LEL= 4.3% - UEL= 46%). Heating may cause violent combustion or explosion, decomposes on burning causing toxic gas. It is heavier than air when not combined with other gases and has the unmistakable odor of rotten eggs. However the sense of smell (odor threshold of ppm) is not a reliable warning because exposure to this gas quickly deadens the sense of smell; relying on being able to detect its odor can provide a false sense of security. The purpose of this Code of Practice is to alert workers to the dangers involved in working with H2S gas and to provide guidance for controlling those dangers. Loss of consciousness can occur within seconds of exposure to a high concentration of this gas. The only positive means of determining the amount of Hydrogen Sulfide present is by testing with properly calibrated detectors. If Hydrogen Sulfide is suspected the concentration must be determined before personnel are allowed in the area. Additional precautions should be in place to address the possibility of personnel activities releasing Hydrogen Sulfide (e.g. gases released by depressurizing, purging or walking through liquids). EXPOSURE ROUTES Hydrogen Sulfide can be absorbed into the body through inhalation or through skin and eye contact. POSSIBLE HEALTH EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE Short term exposure to Hydrogen Sulfide can irritate the eyes and respiratory tract as well as affect the central nervous system. Acute exposure may result in unconsciousness and even death. Inhalation of this gas may result in lung edema, which may not manifest for hours after an exposure and is exacerbated by physical exertion Level (PPM) Effects of Exposure 10 No known effects from 8 hour exposure Minimal eye and respiratory-tract irritation Marked eye and respiratory-tract irritation Severe eye and respiratory-tract irritation, loss of smell fatal in 8-48hours, 100 ppm is considered immediately dangerous to life and Health (IDLH) Headaches, drowsiness, prolonged exposure might cause fluid accumulation in the lungs Possible unconsciousness and death in 1-4 hours Fatal in hour Greater than Rapidly Fatal 700ppm 68 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

69 If there is potential for a worker to be exposed to H2S this must be identified in the hazard assessment prior to any worker being exposed to the area. Always make sure atmospheric testing results are assessed before a worker is exposed. It is HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES s responsibility to make sure that worker s exposure to H2S is kept as low as reasonably possible. Workers must never be exposed to airborne concentrations of H2S that exceeds 10ppm over an 8 hour time period. Workers will not be exposed to H2S at a concentration exceeding its ceiling limit at any time. NOTE: The ceiling limit cannot exceed 15 ppm, (without respiratory equipment) at any time. EXPOSURE LIMITS Our Company has adopted the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code Occupational Exposure Limits. The Occupational Exposure Limit for all Company operations is: 8 hour Time Weighted Average (TWA).10 ppm 15 minute Short Term Exposure Level (STEL)...15 ppm NOTE: The terms Time Weighted Average (TWA), Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL) and Threshold Limit Value (TLV) can be used interchangeably within the scope of our Company s Codes of Practice and all indicate maximum exposure based on an 8 hour work day. CONTROLS AND PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Where Hydrogen Sulfide exposures exist our Company will ensure control measures are instituted to reduce these exposures to or as close to zero as possible. Suitable personal protective equipment shall be worn in those cases where control methods are not permissible. The minimum approved PPE materials are: Use of supplied air (SCBA or SABA) is indicated for all exposures exceeding TWA. FRW coveralls, chemical resistant gloves and safety glasses. If Hydrogen Sulfide is found to be present the following procedures are to be adopted: Pre-job (daily) calibration of personal gas detectors must be performed according to manufacturer's instructions At least two wind direction indicators must be installed in locations visible from all areas of the site Hydrogen Sulfide warning signs must be located no more than ¼ mile from the work site At least two designated safe areas with at least two sets of self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA's) must be located in each area Emergency escape breathing units must be kept at the safe area All personnel working on location must have completed an approved Hydrogen Sulfide training program Extra caution must be used around low places such as cellars and ditches since Hydrogen Sulfide is heavier than air and tends to collect in these areas In areas where high concentrations are likely, employees should work in pairs with breathing units readily available 69 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

70 All personnel must avoid entering any confined space, such as a tank, vessel, or other enclosed area unless (1) they have received confined space entry training (2) they have a permit for entry when required, and (3) the space has been tested and found safe for entry MONITORING Monitoring frequency depends on the exposure levels. The area manager is responsible to ensure monitoring is conducted prior to work starting in any area Hydrogen Sulfide contamination is suspected and thereafter when there is a change in production, process, control equipment, personnel or work practices which may lead to additional or new Hydrogen Sulfide exposures. Workers must be informed of testing results within fifteen (15) days of the receipt of those results. MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE Any worker exposed to Hydrogen Sulfide concentrations at one half the OEL should have regular medical examinations. These examinations will be provided by medical laboratory contracted by but not affiliated with our Company at no cost to the worker and in accordance with our Company`s Hydrogen Sulfide Medical Surveillance Protocol. NOTE: If it is confirmed a worker has been exposed to Hydrogen Sulfide levels above the OEL, then participation in the Medical Surveillance Program is compulsory. Medical surveillance may include: Annual physical examinations including a medical history Whole blood (chemical/metabolite) Chest x-ray Pulmonary function tests TRAINING All Company employees and contractors working in areas where a potential for Hydrogen Sulfide exposure above the OEL must receive orientation/training on: Hydrogen Sulfide Code of Practice Enform H2S Alive Training Standard First Aid and CPR Potential sources of exposure Respirator use care and maintenance Gas monitor use, care and maintenance The Company requires all workers to have competency training in H2S and rescue. Workers will be informed of all regulated areas and will be properly trained in entry procedures, safety requirements, and practices while in regulated areas. All HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES workers exposed to oil and gas sites must be trained in procedures used to minimize exposure to H2S. 70 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

71 All workers, prior to entering an area where H2S is present or may be encountered, shall RESPONSIBILITIES Site Supervisors is responsible to: Identify tasks that may be associated with Hydrogen Sulfide exposures Evaluate and select appropriate Hydrogen Sulfide control solutions Orientate workers in the hazards of Hydrogen Sulfide, potential sources of exposure, safe work practices and the use and care of PPE Worker is responsible to: Know and follow this Code of Practice Keep PPE in good working condition Report any infractions of the Hydrogen Sulfide Code of Practice to their supervisor or designate, regardless of whom is responsible for the infraction A worker who is pregnant or intends on becoming pregnant and is aware they are exposed to Hydrogen Sulfide contamination must notify their direct supervisor or contact the HSE advisor Site Management is responsible to: Identify and facilitate Hydrogen Sulfide level monitoring for their work activities Implement a Medical Surveillance Program which includes but not limited to; the monitoring of exposed workers, individual counseling and reporting of results The HSE Department is responsible to: Do an annual review of this Code of Practice Advise department management on test results and site monitoring REFERENCE 1. Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code 2. Occupational Health & Safety Administration 3. Odor Thresholds AIHA Press 71 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

72 72 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

73 SAFE LADDER USE 73 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

74 PURPOSE The purpose of this standard is to ensure ladders are chosen in accordance with applicable standards, appropriate to the hazards present, and used in a safe manner. Workers will not use a ladder to enter or leave an elevated or sub-level work area when the work area has another safe and recognizable way to enter or leave. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Ladders in this standard are assumed to be commercially manufactured. 1. Ladders can only be used to enter or leave elevated or sub-level work areas where no other safe and approved method is available. 2. Wooden ladders will not be coated with anything other than transparent protective coating. 3. Ladders used during servicing of energized or potentially energized equipment will be made of non-conductive material. 4. Workers can only climb on permanent ladders affixed to extending booms of powered mobile equipment when the boom is not in motion, and where outriggers are part of the equipment, they are deployed. PORTABLE LADDERS 1. Portable ladders must be CSA certified, ladders manufactured after July 1, 2009 will meet the applicable ANSI or CSA Standard. 2. Workers are required to place ladders on a stable base, and secure them against movement. 3. Inclined ladders must; a. Be placed no further from the base of the wall or structure than one-quarter the distance between the base of the ladder and the place where the ladder contacts the wall, and b. With the side rails extended a minimum of 1 metre above any platform, landing or parapet, where the ladder is used as a means of access. 4. Workers are not allowed to work off either of the top two rungs, steps or cleats of a portable ladder unless; a. the manufacturer s specifications permit it, or b. the ladder is a step ladder with a railed platform. 5. Personal fall arrest systems are required when working 3 metres or more, unless; a. A worker is only moving up or down a ladder, or b. The work is a light duty task of short duration at each location, c. The worker maintains three-point contact whenever extending an arm beyond the side rails of the ladder, and d. The worker s centre of balance is at the centre of the ladder, even with an arm extended beyond the side rails of the ladder. 74 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

75 6. Fall arrest systems will be chosen and used, and in accordance with Part 9 Fall Protection of the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code. 7. Workers required to wear personal fall arrest systems will receive OSSA certified fall protection training by certified training providers. CRAWL BOARD OR ROOF LADDERS 1. Crawl boards and roof ladders used for roof work will be; a. Securely fastened by hooking the board or ladder over the ridge of the roof, or other equally effective means, and b. Not supported by an eaves trough. FIXED LADDERS Fixed ladders will meet the design criteria outlined in Part 8, Section 130 of the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code. 75 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

76 LOCK OUT / TAGOUT PROCEDURE (L.O.T.O.) 76 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

77 Introduction This program contains all the information regarding the control of hazardous energy sources. It is a reference document designed to allow for a common and consistent understanding and implementation of lockout/tag out principles. Locks Danger Symbol The presence of a lock on a hazardous energy source represents a symbol of danger. It indicates that one or more persons are performing work on equipment and that the reactivation of the energy source could compromise their physical integrity, in case of an untimely start or an unexpected release of stored energy. The program includes machines, equipment, processes, tools, electrical installations, and motorized vehicles with or without a driver, piping (pneumatic and hydraulic conduits, pipes containing pressurized hazardous material, pressurized containers) and confined spaces. Objectives Objectives related to the implementation of the lockout/tag out program are: Establish minimum work practices to ensure the safety of personnel who work on machines, equipment and systems against dangers related to existing energy sources. Protect workers against the incidental power-up or start-up of machines or incidental release of energy or hazardous material. Compliance with applicable regulations with regard to lockout/tag out. Risks Identification, Assessment and Control Identification of Risks/Dangers Machines and tools are often powered by more than one energy source. For each inventoried energy source, it is important to establish the origin of this energy, how it flows and what it generates. Required measures to remove residual energy (force or gravity, springs, batteries, compressed air line etc.) must be provided for. 77 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

78 ENERGY SOURCES Electrical: any electrical current supplying an equipment (including: static electricity) Mechanical (kinetic energy): moving objects Mechanical (gravitational energy): suspended objects Mechanical (potential energy): energy storing object Pneumatic Hydraulic Thermal Chemical Radioactive OBJECTS IN MOVEMENT Engine Transformer Electrical Panel Capacitor Gears Roller Cylinder Conveyor Winch Hoist Spring Pressurized Pipe Compressor Pneumatic Tool Loader Elevator Heater Steam Boiler Dryer Any container, tank or pipe containing a chemical product Self-leveling device on a machine Affected Tasks It is necessary to be familiar with the different tasks that can be performed on equipment and machines. Here are the tasks affected by this program: Unblocking, unjamming Repairs Maintenance Assembly and/or installation, start-up and/or oilfield Adjustment, set-up Inspection, verification and/or demolition Servicing, lubrication Modification and/or replacement Programming, training Risk Control Mandatory Lockout/Tag out Lockout/tag out is mandatory before starting a task affected by the program in a danger zone. Lockout/tag out at a zero energy level is not possible in all situations. Therefore, when lockout/tag out affects tasks that are an integral part of a production process or when lockout/tag out is impossible because Of the nature of the work to perform, or Of a technical impossibility 78 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

79 Lockout/Tag out Materials A lockout/tag out sheet is required, even if there is only one energy source, when: The equipment has a potential of residual or stored energy; The isolation and lock of the energy source does not completely cut off the machine s power supply; Only one lockout/tag out device is not enough to completely lock the equipment; The lockout device is not under the exclusive control of the authorized person who performs the maintenance or repair work Lockout/Tag out Sheet The lockout/tag out sheet specifies the order to follow for the lockout/tag out, the performance of the start-up test and the removal of the locks. Each piece of equipment powered by more than one (1) energy source has its own lockout/tag out sheet that was prepared and validated by a qualified person before its use. A lockout/tag out sheet should contain at least the following: Name of machine, equipment or process Sheet number List of required lockout devices Instructions to stop and release residual energy Instructions to check isolation and power shut-off Instructions to check workplace evacuation Instructions to check reactivation Name or qualified person who approved the sheet Creation and revision dates of the sheet For new equipment a lockout/tag out procedure must be possible on this equipment. A lockout/tag out sheet in accordance with the program is created before the start-up of the new equipment. Isolation Devices Energy source isolating devices are mechanical devices that physically prevent the transfer or release of energy such as a disconnect switch, guillotine valve, manual circuit-breaker, valve, manual valve, air valve, shim, chain, donut etc. NOTE: Emergency stop buttons, push-button selectors and other similar devices are not considered energy source isolating devices. An energy source label such as the one that follows is a simple way to code energy sources cut-off points and other items that must be locked. 79 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

80 Equipment or machines are not always designed to directly control the energy at the cut-off point. In order to do so, there is a wide variety of lockout/tag out devices that adapt to almost all equipment and are used to neutralize the mechanism in the desired position Locks A lock register is kept to identify lock holders and the corresponding key number. Annex 4 shows an example of a register. If the unique key cannot be found or if the lock must be removed without the unique key, the forgotten lock or key procedure is applied Lockout/Tag out Station Each area must have a lockout/tag out station where lockout/tag out documentation and accessories can be found, such as: Lockout devices Lockout/tag out sheets Copy of the lockout/tag out register Mobile lockout/tag out box Green locks for entrepreneurs, subcontractors, contractors Borrowed locks register (see Annex 5) Information tags Hasps Information Tag An information tag is affixed to each lockout/tag out device when applying the procedure (see Annex 6A). The tag shows the name of the authorized person who installed the device, the date and reason of the lockout/tag out. Information is supplied in order to report any hazardous conditions and can include a warning such as =Danger=, =Do not start= or= Do not activate= Mobile Lockout/Tag out Box (optional) The mobile lockout/tag out box is a box containing several white serial locks with an identical key. It is used to simplify lockout/tag out procedures when there are three (3) or more authorized people involved or four (4) or more isolating devices to lock out. The box is locked with a department lock which unique key is held by the lockout/tag out coordinator or department supervisor. Each authorized person involved in the works must install his lock in the box. If needed, this box is available at the lockout/tag out station located in the areas. Its handle allows you to install it near the work site. 80 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

81 3.3.7 Subcontractors and Contractors Supply a lock to the contractor and the machine, equipment or process lockout/tag out sheet. The borrowed lock is documented in the borrowed locks register at the lockout/tag out station (Annex 5). At the end of the works, the contractor asks the person in charge to check the works before removing the lock that was lent to him. If the works are not complete and the contractor must leave the premise, the procedure regarding the change of shift or personnel applies (see section 4.5 Change of Work Shift or Personnel) Procedures Before starting works that require a lockout/tag out, each person exposed to a danger installs his lock(s) and tag(s) on the control mechanisms, according to the instructions on the lockout/tag out sheet. He must check if the equipment is deactivated and grounded. The removal of locks on equipment is performed only by the worker who applied the lockout/tag out procedure, except in the case of a forgotten lock or change of work shift. Individual Lockout/Tag out These steps must be followed when implementing the general lockout/tag out procedure: Isolation of energy sources as indicated on the lockout/tag out sheet. Installation of lockout devices on each isolating devices. All employees, with no exception, working on a machine, equipment, or process must install his personal lock. To better comply with this requirement, a hasp must be installed every time. All residual or accumulated potentially hazardous energy must be released, blocked, purged, confined or secured by the authorized persons who participated in the works. Each worker involved must make sure that this step has been followed. Before starting the work, an authorized person must test all activation buttons and other control devices or check the power supply of all electrical devices in order to confirm that all equipment has been de-energized. The authorized person must make sure that all controls are at a stop or neutral position after trying to activate them. Affix information tag and start work MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES Supervisors must ensure when scheduled maintenance work is being conducted on equipment that the involved workers must place their own lock and tag on each energy control point and/or a personal lock to each energy isolation device. 81 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

82 Group Lockout-Tag out When three (3) or more authorized people are protected or when four (4) or more energy source isolating devices must be locked, each device is protected by a lockout/tag out in accordance with the following steps: These steps must be followed when implementing the Group lockout/tag out procedure: The main authorized person is in charge of the lockout of each energy source isolating device using white serial locks included in the lockout box. The key for lockout devices is kept by the main authorized person in the lockout box closed with area management lock. Once lockout is applied, a verification procedure is followed to evaluate the efficiency of the isolation of the energy source. All residual or accumulated potentially hazardous energy must be released, blocked, purged, confined or secured by the authorized persons who participate in the works. Each worker involved must make sure that this step has been followed Before starting the work, an authorized person must test all activation buttons and other control devices or check the power supply of all electrical devices in order to confirm that all equipment has been de-energized. The authorized person must make sure that all controls are at a stop or neutral position after trying to activate them. The work will start only when all authorized persons have installed their personal lock on the lockout box and their information tag. Once all authorized workers have removed their personal lock, the main authorized person must go around of the isolated machine, equipment or process to make sure all authorized persons are safe before removing the department lock and all white serial locks from the energy source isolating devices. Forgotten Lock or Key Forgotten Lock The following procedure was established for the safe removal of lockout/tagout devices and information tags that are forgotten on an energy source isolating device by an authorized person who has left the premise or who is not able to remove them himself. The procedure is used to confirm: a) That the person has left the premises b) That all responsible means were taken to contact directly the person, and c) That if this person was contacted, he/she was informed of the situation and was asked to return to the premise to remove its locks and tags, if needed. 82 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

83 If it is impossible to contact the authorized person who has installed the lock or the tag OR if this person is reasonably not able to return to the premise, an authorized person with authority, typically the Supervisor/Manager in charge, supported by an appropriate technical team, makes sure that the employee s lock and tag are removed safely by following the steps mentioned below. If the area Supervisor/Manager cannot be contacted, the lock and tag remain in place until the procedure can be followed These steps must be followed when implementing the forgotten lock or key removal procedure: Check the status or condition of the machine, equipment or process and make sure this status or condition allows for the safe removal of the lockout device. The person in charge of the removal must complete a report regarding the removal of the lockout device, once it has been determined that it is safe to remove the lock and the tag Certain provisions are required in order to inform the authorized persons of the removal of the lock and tag before his return to work The lockout device and tag must be removed in the presence of a witness and stored safely by the person responsible for the removal. Forgotten Key The forgotten lock procedure applies. If the key cannot be found, the lock is cut. Change of Work Shift or Personnel During work shift or personnel changes, the following procedure is applied to ensure safety is maintained. Its purpose is to ensure a methodical transfer of lockout/tag out and safety device measures among authorized people leaving or arriving on the premises and to reduce as much as possible the exposure to hazardous situations caused by the unexpected supply or start-up of a machine, equipment or process or release of stored energy. These steps must be followed when implementing the forgotten key removal procedure: Area Management lock must be installed on each energy source isolating device.. The personal lock of the authorized employee who has completed his work shift or who must leave can be removed but the departments lock remains in place. All new authorized people must install their personal lock and make sure that the lockout/tagout procedure is followed according to good practices, including a new start-up test The Area Management lock will be removed only when all works will be completed and when the equipment or process is ready to be reactivated.. 83 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

84 Lock Removal Usually the reactivation procedure steps are the lockout/tag out procedure steps in reverse order except in certain circumstances when an exact sequence must be followed. Lock removal steps can be found on the lockout/tag out sheet. Lockout/tag out can be ended as such: These steps must be followed when implementing the forgotten key removal procedure: Each lock (and tag, when needed) must be removed by the authorized person who has installed it before leaving the workplace The person in charge of the machine, equipment or process (affected employee) must be informed when the work is completed and the general lockout/tagout has ended Before the machine, equipment or process is reactivated, the work area must be inspected visually by an authorized person to confirm that all personnel members have evacuated the area, all non essential articles have been collected and all components are intact with regard to their operation Roles and Responsibilities Affected Employee Is able to recognize lockout-tag out activities occurring in his area and not disturb them. Observes the prohibition to reactivate locked out equipment. Contractor Performs the works in accordance with the existing lockout/tag out procedure. Uses the lock supplied, and returns it with the lockout/tag out sheet at the end of his work. Discusses and asks authorized personnel, to check the works once the tasks are complete. Authorized Personnel Completes lockout/tag out training Applies and observes existing lockout/tag out lock removal procedures. Keeps his personal lock key on him or near the work area. The lock and the key must never be given to anyone. After the works, makes sure the equipment is ready to be reactivated and communicates the information to all affected employees. Reports all required changes regarding lockout/tag out. 84 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

85 Lockout/Tag out Coordinator Qualified Person who: Implements a lockout/tag out program. Purchases equipment and materials required for lockout/tag out. Issues, approves and updates lockout/tag out sheets for equipment. Informs all employees of each person s roles and responsibilities. Informs/trains affected workers on lockout/tag out procedures. Ensures the regular follow-up, evaluation and update of the program. Implements an action plan and ensures the follow-up regarding non-conformities related to the control of hazardous energy sources. Immediate Supervisor or Authorized Personnel Make sure work is performed according to lockout/tag out procedures. Keeps energy source isolating devices in good condition and properly identified. Makes sure lockout/tag out equipment is in good condition and available at all times. Checks if the lockout tag was properly completed after each lockout/tag out activity. Keeps registers related to lockout/tag out (lock holders, borrowed locks) Audits lockout/tag out implementation. Audits compliance with lockout/tag out sheets. Training Authorized Personnel Only the employees who have completed the training on the lockout/tag out program are authorized to implement lockout/tag out procedures and to remove locks. The initial general training is used to recognize: Hazardous energy sources; The type and importance of energy present at the work place; The required means to isolate energy and control each machine for repair/maintenance. Training is given to authorized persons when they are given responsibilities that require the performance of lockout/tag out activities. Following this a supplementary training on area specific lockout/tag out program is given at the worksite. 85 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

86 Audits Two (2) types of audits will apply: System Audit The system audit is the annual verification of the lockout/tag out program implementation at a worksite. It consists of validating if the requirements of the lockout/tag out program are observed. Lockout/Tag out Implementation Audit The lockout/tag out implementation audit is used to check the specific implementation of the lockout/tag out procedure on the equipment selected by the auditors. Definitions With regard to lockout/tag out the following definitions apply: Area Lock Separate lock with the department name and an identification number kept by the person in charge of lockout/tag out or the department supervisor. This lock facilitates multiple lockout/tag out application. It can also be used when we must replace the personal lock of a worker who leaves the premises at the end of his work shift or when an equipment part must be locked for several days. In all cases, a lockout tag indicating the reason for its use must be attached to the lock. Group Lock Area lock that represents a specific group of authorized workers regarding a complex group lockout/tag out. Serial Lock Locks included in the lockout/tag out box and used mainly when there are multiple energy sources to lockout/tag out by one person or during a group lockout/tag out or a complex lockout/tag out. Lockout/Tag out Installation by each person exposed to the danger of a lockout device, lock and tag on an energy source isolating device in accordance with an established procedure indicating that the energy source isolating device must not be activated before the removal of the lock or the tag in accordance with the established procedure. Lockout Device Mechanical lockout device that uses an individual key lock to keep the energy source isolating device in a position that prevents the power up of a machine, equipment or process. 86 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

87 Residual Energy Energy that is stored in the equipment and that is not neutralized by the interruption of the electrical supply. Pneumatic, hydraulic circuits, springs, batteries, potential energy, gravitational energy are typical examples. These energies must be deactivated before the lockout/tag out to avoid an unexpected or untimely release of energy. Source Label Label that helps locate the energy source. Authorized Personnel Trained employee who applies the lockout/tag out procedure on a machine or equipment in order to perform procedure or maintenance work. Qualified Personnel People with the expertise, technical knowledge or necessary knowledge to evaluate the appropriateness or the lockout/tag out procedures and confirm their compliance with this program. Hasp Device that allows several workers to lock out the same energy source. When it is used with only one lock, it helps avoid the removal of locks in case other locks must be added. The last hole is always reserved for adding another hasp, when necessary 87 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

88 LOCK OUT TAG OUT SHEET 88 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

89 LOCK OWNERS REGISTER 89 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

90 MODELS OF INFORMATION TAGS 90 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

91 LOCK OUT DEVICE AND TAG REMOVAL REPORT 91 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

92 NOTICE TO AUTHORIZED PERSONREGARDING THE REMOVAL OF THIS LOCK 92 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

93 MACHINE SAFE GUARDING 93 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

94 PURPOSE The purpose of this standard is to ensure workers are prevented from being exposed to; Hazardous components and processes of equipment, Hazards associated with falling equipment, tools, and materials, and The hazards of working from raised platforms. APPLICABLE HAZARDS Hazards applicable to this standard include the following where a worker could incidentally or through a process, come into contact with; Moving parts of machinery or equipment, Points of machinery or equipment at which material is cut, shaped or bored, Surfaces with temperatures that may cause skin to freeze, burn or blister, Energized electrical cables, Debris, materials or other objects are thrown from machinery or equipment, Material being fed into or removed from process machinery or equipment, Machinery or equipment that may be hazardous due to its operation, or Any other hazard. EXEMPTIONS Safeguards to do not have to be provided under the following conditions; 1. Machinery is already designed to; a. Automatically stop if a worker was to come into contact with a moving part or where material is cut, shaped or bored, or b. Eliminates or prevents a worker from any of the hazards identified under the requirements of this standard. OR 2. An alternative mechanism, system, or change in a work procedure in place of a safeguard offers protection equal to or greater than the protection of a safeguard. OR 3. The machinery cannot accommodate or operate with safe guards, and workers in the vicinity of the machinery wear personal protective equipment appropriate to the hazards present that provides greater or equal protection than the safeguard s. REQUIREMENTS - GENERAL 1. Safeguards will be provided, where any of the exemptions do not apply5. 2. Safeguards that contain or deflect flying particles and materials, broken parts, or a shock wave will be installed on machines that present these hazards in the event of machine failure 94 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

95 3. Push sticks or blocks will be provided for all cutting and shaping machinery that requires a worker to feed materials. 4. Wire mesh used as a safeguard will be; a. Fabricated with wire at least 1.6 millimetres in diameter, and b. Spaced to reject a ball 40 millimetres in diameter. REMOVING SAFEGUARDS EQUIPMENT IN OPERATION 1. A safeguard cannot be removed when machinery is operating unless designed to be removed when being operated, and it is to perform; a. Maintenance, b. Repairs, c. Adjustments, or d. Other tasks on the equipment. REMOVING SAFEGUARDS - GENERAL 1. Where a safeguard is removed or made ineffective; a. An alternative means of protective measures must be put in place until the safeguard is replaced, b. The safeguard is replaced immediately after the task is completed, and c. The safeguard functions properly once it is replaced. 2. Where a safeguard is removed and the worker does not have direct control of the machine, the worker is responsible to lock out and tag out the machinery or render it inoperative. 3. Requirements for lock out-tag out or rendering a machine inoperative must be done in accordance with Part 15 Managing the Control of Hazardous Energy, of the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code. OPENINGS 1. Openings and holes will be protected where a worker could fall by; a. A securely attached cover designed to support an anticipated load, b. Guardrails and toe boards, or c. An alternative means of protection. 2. An alternative means will be immediately provided as a means of protection where a covering, guardrail, or toe board has been removed. 3. Alternative means of protection from openings or holes will have signage indicating the hazard, and posted near or on the cover. GUARDRAILS 1. Guardrails, including temporary guardrails, will meet all requirements outlined in Part 22 Safeguards, Section 315(1-2) of the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code. 2. Guardrails will be secured to ensure they cannot move in any direction if at any point they come into contact with a worker, materials, or equipment 95 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

96 TOE BOARDS 1. Toe boards will be installed where; a. Guardrails are installed, b. Materials could fall more than 1.8 metres, c. Temporary scaffolding or temporary work platforms if materials could fall more than 3.5 metres, and d. Workers are required to work around a pit that has rotating machine parts in the pit. 2. Toe boards will meet all spatial requirements in Part 22 Safeguards, Section 321 (1) of the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code. 3. Toe boards are not required; a. At the entrance to a ladder, or b. The loading and unloading area of permanent work surfaces, where other precautions have been implemented. OVERHEAD PROTECTION 1. An adequate and appropriate method of warning workers will be placed in work sites where overhead hazards exist but workers are exposed intermittently or incidentally to perform their regular duties. 2. Overhead safeguards will be provided where falling objects could injure a worker, and workers are exposed continuously exposed to the overhead hazards. 3. Equipment and materials will be contained from falling using wire mesh or other equally effective method of enclosure that is; a. A minimum of one metre high from the floor, platform, or working level of a safeguard, and b. Fully enclosed on all sides of a cantilever hoist or skip, except on the side adjacent to the building. 4. Alternative means of protection will be used where the sides of a cantilever hoist cannot be enclosed when hoisting or lowering material. 5. Underground shafts used as tunnels will be protected from tools or equipment falling with wire mesh rope or other suitable enclosure at a minimum of 1 metre from the surface. 6. Building shaft cages, tower hoists, and hoist cages used underground will have safeguards installed on all sides. 7. Hoist cages used underground will be made of wire mesh and enclose materials in a manner that workers are not exposed to hazards if the cage was to move in the shaft. SAFETY NETS 1. Safety nets will meet the requirements of the; a. ANSI Standard A (R1998), Oilfield and Demolition Operations-Personnel and Debris Nets, and b. Part 22 Safeguards, Section 320 (1) of the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code. 2. A professional engineer will certify that the supporting structures personnel safety nets are attached to are capable of withstanding any potential load the net may be exposed to. 96 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

97 BUILDING SHAFTS 1. Signage will be in place at every entry point of the shaft, warning of the hazard, where work is being conducted on a building shaft. 2. Where work platforms are used in building shafts the following will be provided; a. A completely decked main platform designed to support any anticipated load, and b. A second platform not more than 4 metres below the main platform. 3. Where no work platform is present at a doorway or opening of a building shaft; a. The doorway or opening will be enclosed, b. The enclosure will be a minimum of 2 metres high, and c. The enclosed area will have an access door 97 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

98 NOISE 98 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

99 PURPOSE The following procedure has been created as a framework to protect you from permanent hearing loss due to workplace exposure EXPOSURE ROUTES HEALTH EFFECTS Hearing loss affects the individuals ability to understand conversations, hear warning sounds or alarms, and listen to music or the sounds of nature. This hearing loss should not be thought of as total deafness but instead a lack of ability to hear sounds in specific ranges, most commonly in the range of common speech. EXPOSURE LIMITS Our Company has adopted the Government of Alberta s regulated occupational exposure limits (OEL). The OEL for all Company operations are Occupational Health and Safety Code, Schedule 3 Table 1 Table 1: Occupational Exposure Limits For Noise EXPOSURE LEVEL (DBA) EXPOSURE DURATION Hours Hours & 41 minutes Hours & 4 minutes 85 8 Hours 88 4 Hours 91 2 Hours 94 1 Hour Minutes Minutes Minutes Minutes Minutes Seconds 115 OR GREATER 0 99 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

100 MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE Any worker exposed to Noise concentrations above the OEL must have regular medical examinations. These examinations will be provided by medical laboratory contracted by, but not affiliated with, our Company at no cost to the worker and in accordance with the Company s Noise Medical Surveillance Protocol and the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Code, Part 16. If it is confirmed a worker has been exposed to Noise levels above the OEL then participation in the Medical Surveillance Program is compulsory. Baseline audiometric testing must be conducted within 6 months of hiring and within 12 months from the base line test. WORKSITE MONITORING Worksite monitoring frequency depends on the noise exposure levels. The area manager is responsible to ensure monitoring is conducted prior to work starting in any area where noise exceeds the OEL (85 dba adjusted for an 8 hour day) and thereafter when there is a change in production, process, control equipment, personnel or work practices which may lead to additional or new noise exposures. Workers must be informed of worksite monitoring results within fifteen days of the receipt of those results. Monitoring to be conducted in accordance with CSA approved standards. Annually, Company worksites and equipment will be screened to determine where noise levels exceed 85dBA Lex, and further noise exposure assessments are required. NOISE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Workers must not be exposed to noise levels exceeding 85 dba, if an assessment confirms that noise levels exceed 85 dba Lex, the Company will implement a Noise Management Program. The program will be in written form and available to all workers. The program elements will include, but may not be limited to, the following: Worker education; Measuring or monitoring worker exposure to noise; Annual testing required, Posting warning signs in any work area where the noise level exceeds 85 dba; Use of noise control methods; Selection, use and maintenance of hearing protection devices; Audiometric testing; and Annual program review. CONTROLS AND PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Where noise exposures exceed legislated limits our Company will ensure control measures are instituted to reduce these exposures to levels below the OEL. Such control measures will include noise barriers, procedures or warning signs. Suitable personal protective equipment shall be worn in those cases where control methods are not permissible. The minimum approved PPE materials are Occupational Health and Safety Code, Schedule 3, Table HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

101 TRAINING All Company employees and contractors working in areas where a potential for Noise exposure above the OEL exists shall be orientated on or receive training on: The hazards of exposure to excess noise The information provided in our Company s Codes of Practice (employees) or equivalent (contractors) Training in the selection, use and maintenance of required protective equipment (this should include a supervised practice in the proper fitting of hearing protection) RESPONSIBILITIES Worker is responsible to: Know and follow this Code of Practice Keep PPE in good working condition Report any infractions of the Noise Code of Practice to their supervisor or designate Site Supervisor is responsible to: Identify noise exposures (constant, combined or impulse) Evaluate and select appropriate Noise controls Orientate workers in the hazards of noise, sources of exposure, safe work practices and the use, care and maintenance of PPE Site Management is responsible to: Identify and facilitate noise level monitoring requirements for their work activities Implement a Noise Management Program as required based on worker exposure 101 HYDRO TECH OILFIELD SERVICES-Updated: October-9-13

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