Objective: To launch a soda bottle rocket, achieve maximum time of flight, and safely land a payload (tennis ball).

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Objective: To launch a soda bottle rocket, achieve maximum time of flight, and safely land a payload (tennis ball)."

Transcription

1 Bottle Rocket Project Objective: To launch a soda bottle rocket, achieve maximum time of flight, and safely land a payload (tennis ball). Materials: 2 liter plastic soda bottle (carbonated beverage bottle) and any safe material you think you can use. You cannot use helium filled balloons or commercially made parts. Timing: Timing of the rocket starts when the rocket leaves the launch pad, and stops when the tennis ball carrying part of the rocket hits the ground, when the rocket disappears from sight, or when the rocket impacts or gets entangled in an object (e.g. the rocket collides with a tree.) Project Guidelines: You can work with one additional person or work by yourself. Each rocket s pressure vessel must be made out of a single 2-liter plastic carbonated beverage bottles with a neck/nozzle opening approximately 2.2 cm inside diameter. The structural integrity of the pressure vessel may not be altered. Examples of altering structural integrity include but are not limited to physical, thermal or chemical damage (e.g. cutting, sanding, using hot glues, or super glues on the bottle that will be pressurized). Adhesive may be used to attach fins and other components but must be limited to glue such as silicone adhesive, polyurethane based adhesives and others that do not damage the structural integrity of the pressure vessel. Rockets may not use sharp or pointed metal components or a leading surface with a rigid spike Fins and other parts added to the bottle must be 2 cm above the level of the flange on the bottle s neck. All energy imparted to the rocket must originate from the water/air pressure combination. All rockets will be launched at psi. Once the rocket is pressurized, contestants may not touch or approach the rocket. WHAT MAKES THE BOTTLE ROCKET WORK? 1. Fuel - Water is poured into the pressure chamber. Air is then pumped into the bottle to pressurize the air in the pressure chamber. 2. Newton s Third Law of Motion - When the pressurized rocket is released, the pressurized air forces the water downward, out of the bottle which provides an upward thrust 3. Newton s Second Law of Motion: To get your rocket to fly to great heights you will need to minimize the rocket s mass while maximizing the amount of force. 4. Stability - Be careful when minimizing mass since if it is too light, the rocket will lose stability as soon as the water is expelled and it will tumble end over end. Whether a rocket is stable or unstable depends upon its design. To be stable, the center of mass must be closer to the top of the rocket than the center of pressure. Construction quality is just as important as design style. Be sure to do a good job while building you rocket for best results. Smooth lines equal less drag. SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS DURING LAUNCH: Stand clear of launch area. Spectators should be 10 m from the rocket when being pressurized. All spectators should pay attention and track the flight of the rocket. DUE DATE: The rocket and pre-launch analysis sheet is due on. This is launch day. 1

2 Water Rocket Structure The basic anatomy of the rocket you will build is presented here. Remember that your objective is to design a water rocket to stay aloft for the greatest period of time and that will carry and land a tennis ball safely. Our rockets consist of an inverted lower 2 liter bottle that is partially filled with water (the fuel) and fitted on the launcher base. This engine bottle is held in place with a metal clip and pressurized to pounds per square inch with an air compressor. When the retaining clip is pulled, the pressurized air and water escape downward out of the bottle, forcing the rocket upward (Newton s 3 rd Law). Students have used a variety of rocket body styles in the past. Feel free to modify the basic designs as needed; however, you must not do anything that would put a hole or weakness in the pressurized, engine bottle. Various types of rockets: a. An engine bottle (2L) with a nose cone. The nose cone holds the tennis ball plus any recovery system. b. An engine bottle (2L) fitted with a second bottle whose base has been removed. The upper bottle slides snugly onto the intact engine bottle (lengthening the rocket can improve the rocket s stability). The tennis ball can be placed in either the upper bottle or nose cone and there is room for a recovery system. c. & d. Both designs feature lengthening the rocket to increase stability by using an intact upper bottle. Fins: Fins are necessary to keep rockets stable by moving the center of pressure towards the back of the rocket (see later section). There are several fin shapes to try. Streamers can also be used, but they also provide a lot of drag on the way up. Nose cone: Maximum height results from three things: maximum thrust, the smallest amount of weight that will provide stability, and minimal air resistance. A strong, smooth and symmetrical nose cone can - decrease air resistance, - aid stability by moving the center of mass towards the front (see later section). - house a recovery system and payload. Recovery System: - A recovery system is something that slows the rocket s decent (parachute, streamers, helicopter, backslider that redistributes the center of mass or pressure so that the falling rocket tumbles). A recovery system will protect the rocket and payload on landing. It is important that you design a parachute that i) opens effectively and functions to slow the descent of the tennis ball ii) folds compactly to stow away properly so that it does not increase drag on the flight up and that deploys and opens after the rocket reaches peak height. iii) You need to test out the parachutes you design 2

3 Rocket Performance THRUST To make the rocket shoot high into the air, an upward net impulse (net force x time) must be exerted on the rocket. In other words, the thrust force must exceed the sum of the drag and gravitational forces on the rocket. In a water rocket, compressed air serves as the propellant. When the rocket is launched, the compressed air expands, and as the rocket pushes the expanding air down and out of the bottle, the air propellant pushes upward on the rocket providing an impulse or thrust. The more compressed air present, the longer the thrusting phase lasts. Adding water to the bottle can significantly increase the impulse of the propellant because the larger exhaust mass directed downward produces a larger impulse upward on the rocket : Ft=mv). However, too much water in the rocket leaves too little compressed air to effectively expel the water. Finding the right air-to water ratio for maximum impulse during launch is essential for good performance. DRAG and WEIGHT Both drag and the rocket s weight limit the rocket s maximum altitude. The drag force depends on the geometry of the rocket and the smoothness of its surface. A more aerodynamic rocket has less drag force acting on it, helping to maximize the upward net force on the rocket during the thrusting phase of the launch (see left figure) and helping to minimize the downward net force on the rocket during the upward coasting phase of the flight (see right figure), in which the rocket slows. So the goal is to always minimize drag. Be sure to do a good job while building your rocket. Smooth lines equal less drag. The relationship between weight and performance is more complicated. Given the same impulse, a heavier rocket will not reach as great a velocity by the end of the thrusting phase as a light rocket. However, according to Newton s 2 nd law a low-mass rocket will quickly slow due to drag forces while a more massive rocket will not slow as rapidly (And remember that the acceleration due to gravity is mass-independent). So the goal is to make a rocket not so heavy that it compromises the thrust acceleration and not too light that the drag force rapidly slows a low mass rocket. STABILITY Even if the mass of the rocket has been optimized, if the rocket mass is in the wrong place, the rocket will not fly stably or nose-first; rather it will tumble and not ascend very high. Throughout the year in physics we have mostly dealt with particle models of objects. A rocket, however, cannot be treated as a point particle because the forces acting on it cause it to rotate around its center of mass () and the torque that each force exerts depends on where the forces are exerted on the rocket. In the force diagram to the right, although both forces, drag and weight, point down, the fact that they are of different sizes and act at different places will tend to rotate the rocket around the center of mass, resulting in either tumbling and an unstable flight (bottom, left figure) or corrective straightening and stable flight (bottom, right figure). If a stable rocket begins to veer, it will straighten back up on its own. More air pressure will be exerted on the lower end of the rocket than on the upper end. This keeps the lower end down and the nose pointed up! To be stable, the center of mass (where gravity acts) must be closer to the top of the rocket than the center of Thrusting Phase Rocket in flight will veer away from vertical F g UNSTABLE Destabilizing net torque causes rocket to rotate further away from vertical and tumble Coasting Phase F g STABLE Stabilizing net torque causes rocket to rotate back to vertical 3

4 pressure (where drag force acts). Whether a rocket is stable or unstable depends upon its design. How to Determine Rocket Stability A rocket that flies straight through the air is said to be stable. A rocket that veers off course or tumbles is said to be unstable. Whether a rocket is stable or unstable depends upon its design; you must design it so that the centers of mass and pressure are in the correct places. All rockets have two centers. 1. Center of mass (). This is a point about which the rocket balances or rotates. The force of gravity acts at the. You have learned that if the center of mass of an object is directly above or below a support then the object is stable. You can find the rocket s by finding the position where it can be supported stably. The picture to the right shows a rocket suspended from a string. When the string is placed so that the rocket hangs horizontally, it is positioned exactly beneath the rocket s center of mass. (This rocket looks like it should hang with its tail section downward. What you can t see in the picture is a mass of clay placed in the rocket s nose cone. This gives the left side as much mass as the right side. Hence, the rocket balances.) The lies along the line directly above (or below) a support point when the rocket is stable (the force and torque due to gravity is balanced by support). is in geometric center. The center of mass is important to a rocket. If the rocket is unstable, it will tumble around the center of mass in flight the way a stick tumbles when you toss it. 2. Center of pressure (). This is a point where all the aerodynamic drag forces act. It is the position where half of the surface area of the rocket is on one side and half on the other. The center of pressure of a rocket is the middle point. Air strikes the surface of the rocket as the rocket moves. You know what this is like. If you stick your arm outside a car window when it is moving, you feel pressure from the air striking your arm. The center of pressure is different from the center of mass in that its position is not affected by what is inside the rocket. It is only based on the rocket s shape. Depending upon the design of the rocket, the center of mass () and the center of pressure () can be in different places. - When the center of mass is in front of the center of pressure (towards the nose end), the rocket is stable because the torque due to drag acts to straighten the rocket to the vertical (see figure at right: bottom, right). - When the center of pressure is towards the front, the rocket is unstable because the torque due to drag causes the rocket to tumble around the (see figure at right: bottom, left). A simple way to accomplish stability is to lower the by placing fins at the rear of the rocket and raise the by placing extra mass in the nose. Rocket in flight will veer away from vertical. Only drag force exerts a torque around. UNSTABLE Destabilizing net torque causes rocket to rotate further away from vertical and tumble STABLE Stabilizing net torque causes rocket to rotate back to vertical 4

5 FOR YOU TO DO: Determine Your Rocket s Stability Look at the rockets on the left. One is stable and the others are not. is shown with a back dot and with a blue Scale Diagram dot. Rocket B is the most stable rocket. Rocket C will definitely tumble in flight. Rocket A will probably fly on a crooked path. Any cross winds encountered by the rocket as it climbs will cause it to go off course. 1. Draw a scale diagram of your rocket on the graph paper provided. Make it exactly like the shape of your rocket as seen from the side (see figure at right). 2. Center of Mass Determination: a) Tie a string loop snugly around your rocket so that you have one long end to hold. Except for the water needed for launch, your rocket should be set up exactly as it will be during launch. b) Slide the loop until the rocket hangs horizontally. When it hangs horizontally, the string is at the rocket s center of mass (see fig at right). Mark that spot in the middle of your rocket on the scale diagram (see fig of scale diagram). 3. Center of Pressure Determination (film this to verify): a) Cut out a silhouette of your rocket from a piece of cardboard. Make it exactly the same shape and size of your rocket as seen from the side. b) Balance the silhouette on the edge of a ruler. The center of pressure of your rocket is where the ruler is located (see fig at right). Mark that spot in the middle of your rocket on the scale diagram. 4. If the center of pressure is before (towards the rocket s nose) the center of mass, add some additional weight to the nose of the rocket and/or increase the size of the fins. Repeat the tests until the is in front of the. 5. Swing Test: Verify your design results by doing and filming a swing test. a) Balance the rocket again with the string. Use a couple of pieces of masking tape to hold the string loop in position. Determination of Rocket Determination of Rocket Cardboard cutout of silhouette of Rocket Tie string around rocket (without water) and find position of string where rocket balances horizontally. Trace and cut cardboard silhouette of rocket (same shape and size). Find position where cardboard silhouette balances horizontally. b) Stand in a clear area and slowly start the rocket swinging in a circle. If the rocket is really stable, it will swing with its nose forward and the tail to the back. On flight day, hand in the scale diagram (pg.8), the PreLaunch and Launch Analysis Sheet (pg.7) and submit the film of the determination and Swing Test. Other references to consult: 1. NASA site with LOTS of information about rocket design and flight: Recovery systems 5

6 Bottle Rocket Check List and Score Sheet Rocket Construction Criteria (2 pts each) Pressure Vessel is 2 liter carbonated beverage bottle. Pressure vessel has NO punctures/holes so that it holds pressure. No commercial rockets or parts, all parts 2 cm above the level of flange Rocket design and craftsmanship shows careful planning and creativity Fins to stabilize rocket flight are well designed (smooth and uniform) Nose Cone to stabilize Rocket flight Recovery system or something to slow descent Pre-Launch and Launch Analysis Sheet submitted. Stability Scale drawing completed and submitted Videos of Swing test and determination submitted Rocket Flight Score Stable Flight. Time to peak: 0-1.5s (2 pt), s (4 pt) s (6 pt) >3.5s (7 pt) Recovery: Time from Peak to Landing (0.5 points per second) Final Score /Max in class 6

7 Pre Launch Analysis (to hand in on flight day) Rocket Engineer Name: Rocket Engineer Name: Picture of Your Rocket Rocket Specifications Total Mass: g Number of Fins: Total Length: cm Length of Nose Cone: cm Width (widest part): cm Circumference: cm Recovery system: Rocket Stability Center of Mass () Distance from Nose: cm Distance from Tail: cm Center of Pressure () Distance from Nose: cm Distance from Tail: cm Distance of from : cm Did your rocket pass the swing test? Hand in the scale diagram and silhouette used to determine your and Time Trial 1 Time to peak: Time Trial 2 Time to peak: Time Trial 3 Time to peak: Launch Analysis Total time in air: Total tine in air: Improvements made: Total time in air: Improvements made: 7

8 STABILITY: Scale Drawing of Final Rocket with and Indicated (to be handed in on flight day) 8

Very Basic Design Considerations for Water-Bottle Rockets

Very Basic Design Considerations for Water-Bottle Rockets Very Basic Design Considerations for Water-Bottle Rockets The next few pages are provided to help in the design of your water-bottle rocket. Read through this packet and answer the questions on the last

More information

Acceleration= Force OVER Mass. Design Considerations for Water-Bottle Rockets

Acceleration= Force OVER Mass. Design Considerations for Water-Bottle Rockets Acceleration= Force OVER Mass Design Considerations for Water-Bottle Rockets The next few pages are provided to help in the design of your water-bottle rocket. Read through this packet and answer the questions

More information

Bottle Rockets. The bottle rocket, like the squid, uses water as the driving agent and compressed air instead of heat to provide the energy.

Bottle Rockets. The bottle rocket, like the squid, uses water as the driving agent and compressed air instead of heat to provide the energy. Bottle Rockets Problem/Purpose: To create a bottle rocket that will fly straight and will stay in the air for as long as possible. Background Information: A squid propels itself by filling its body with

More information

3, 2, 1, Blast Off! Division A 2019

3, 2, 1, Blast Off! Division A 2019 3, 2, 1, Blast Off! Division A 2019 Event Description Construct and launch two rockets designed to stay aloft the greatest amount of time. Failure to follow all construction rules will result in rockets

More information

Bottle Rocket Launcher P4-2000

Bottle Rocket Launcher P4-2000 WWW.ARBORSCI.COM Bottle Rocket Launcher P4-2000 BACKGROUND: The Bottle Rocket Launcher allows for the exploration of launching rockets using commonly available materials such as plastic soda bottles and

More information

College of Engineering

College of Engineering College of Engineering Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering MAE-250, Section 001 Introduction to Aerospace Engineering Final Project Bottle Rocket Written By: Jesse Hansen Connor Petersen

More information

Water Rocket. THE Challenge: Teams (of 2) will design, build and test a water rocket designed to. The competition requirements:th TEAM MEMBERS:

Water Rocket. THE Challenge: Teams (of 2) will design, build and test a water rocket designed to. The competition requirements:th TEAM MEMBERS: Water Rocket THE Challenge: Teams (of 2) will design, build and test a water rocket designed to stay aloft for the greatest amount of time. The competition requirements:th 1. The rocket s Pressure Vessel

More information

Designing a Model Rocket

Designing a Model Rocket Designing a Model Rocket Design Components In the following pages we are going to look at the design requirements for a stable single stage model rocket. From the diagram here you can see that the rocket

More information

Give Wings to Imagination

Give Wings to Imagination Give Wings to Imagination Water rocket uses water as a propellant. PRINCIPLE It is based on the NEWTON S THIRD LAW OF MOTION. For a simple model, water rocket consists of a bottle having water above

More information

Learning Objectives. Key Concepts: Momentum, Pressure, Aerodynamic Forces

Learning Objectives. Key Concepts: Momentum, Pressure, Aerodynamic Forces Water Rockets Launch rockets high into the sky using nothing but air pressure and a bit of water! There s no better way to demonstrate the principle of momentum exchange. Suggested grade level: 7-8 Activity

More information

Today Mr. Happer told us to use the following physics vocabulary words and relate them to our experiment:

Today Mr. Happer told us to use the following physics vocabulary words and relate them to our experiment: Design Your Own Experiment Lab Report Objective While making our water rocket, our group tried to achieve different criteria listed by Mr. Happer. With our rocket, we were trying to achieve a distance

More information

science-u.org How do you launch a rocket without using Air Pressure Rockets Directions You Will Need ESTIMATED TIME Minutes

science-u.org How do you launch a rocket without using Air Pressure Rockets Directions You Will Need ESTIMATED TIME Minutes BEST FOR GRADES 3-6 ESTIMATED TIME 40-60 Minutes You Will Need 1-3 feet of ½ inch PVC pipe (pre-cut into 6, 10 inch sections) 1-3 feet of ¾ inch pipe insulation 2-5 PVC pipe connectors (curved and straight)

More information

Bottle Rockets. Division B only

Bottle Rockets. Division B only Bottle Rockets Division B only Team and Required Equipment Up to 2 team members Up to 2 qualified rockets No impound required Eye Protection #5 (High Impact ANSI Z87+) Check the lens corners (see example)

More information

wind wobble unstable

wind wobble unstable Rocket Stability During the flight of a model rocket, gusts of wind or thrust instabilities, can cause the rocket to "wobble", or change its attitude in flight. Poorly built or designed rockets can also

More information

Rocket Activity Foam Rocket

Rocket Activity Foam Rocket Rocket Activity Foam Rocket Objective Students will learn about rocket stability and trajectory with rubber bandrpowered foam rockets. Description Students will construct rockets made from pipe insulating

More information

Hang Time Detailed Event Description. Hang Time!

Hang Time Detailed Event Description. Hang Time! Hang Time! Grades: Team: Duration: Supervisor: 3 rd, 4 th, 5 th 1 4 participants 40 minutes Amber Beattie, Alex Damm, Joe Hood, Eli Micale Summary Description Teams will build up to two rockets designed

More information

Materials: Balloon demo (optional): - balloon, string, drinking straw, flour (optional)

Materials: Balloon demo (optional): - balloon, string, drinking straw, flour (optional) Lesson Plan for Water Rockets Demonstration Concepts: Momentum, aerodynamics, propulsion Applicable Classes: EPSS 9, ASTR 3 Educational (for undergraduates) and Instructional (for TAs) videos available

More information

PART 1 Rocket Assembly

PART 1 Rocket Assembly PART 1 Rocket Assembly Please understand that there are many ways for you to do this. Here is one way Bottle Rocket Lab Activity Student Edition OBJECTIVE: The Student will design, construct, assemble,

More information

Stage 2 Stem Project Term 2, Rocket Design. By Willow, Malia and Sofia

Stage 2 Stem Project Term 2, Rocket Design. By Willow, Malia and Sofia Stage 2 Stem Project Term 2, 2018 Rocket Design By Willow, Malia and Sofia Design Brief: Our college is celebrating its 25th birthday and we are wanting to take a photo of all students on the oval. The

More information

Trial/Pilot Event Contact the organizers of your tournament to find out what trial/pilot events will be held.

Trial/Pilot Event Contact the organizers of your tournament to find out what trial/pilot events will be held. Airjectory by Ryan Michela rmmichela@whmo.mil Airjectory is a fast-paced, indoor alternative to Bottle Rockets that emphasizes creative problem solving and rapid decision making. The event combines a number

More information

Design and Make a foam rocket

Design and Make a foam rocket Design and Make a foam rocket Activity DESIGN AND MAKE A FOAM ROCKET - and investigate its flight path. Equipment For each rocket: Foam pipe insulation (½ diameter) 30 cm length Wide rubber band - (6 mm.

More information

WATER ROCK. Lawndart The rocket goes straight up and comes down nose first at high speed. Disadvantages

WATER ROCK. Lawndart The rocket goes straight up and comes down nose first at high speed. Disadvantages Water Rocket Recovery Index What is a recovery system? A recovery system is a feature of a rocket that allows it to come back to Earth with minimal damage. Introduction This guide is intended to serve

More information

1 Korean-American Scientists and Engineers Association National Mathematics and Science Competition. 1. Raft Rally

1 Korean-American Scientists and Engineers Association National Mathematics and Science Competition. 1. Raft Rally 1 Korean-American Scientists and Engineers Association 1. Raft Rally GOAL The goal of raft rally contest is to understand the concept of buoyancy and apply it to the design of a mini boat that can hold

More information

Rockets. Student Journal. After School STEM Academy

Rockets. Student Journal. After School STEM Academy Rockets Student Journal After School STEM Academy 1 2 Activity 1 ACTIVITY 1: SODA STRAW ROCKET ACTIVITY 1. 2. Cut out one big rectangle, otherwise known as your rocket body. Curl the rectangle lengthwise

More information

PUFF! Rocket Activity. Students will learn about rocket stability as they. Students will construct small indoor paper

PUFF! Rocket Activity. Students will learn about rocket stability as they. Students will construct small indoor paper Rocket Activity 3...2...1...PUFF! Students will learn about rocket stability as they Unifying Concepts and Processes Science as Inquiry inquiry Physical Science Science and Technology Students will construct

More information

What do we know about air? What have we observed?

What do we know about air? What have we observed? Air and Flight---Properties of Air Air: - we know it exists, - it s all around us, - we see moving trees, - it fills our lungs, - it has substance but can t be seen Air: - colourless, odourless and tasteless,

More information

Table of Contents. Career Overview... 4

Table of Contents. Career Overview... 4 Table of Contents Career Overview.................................................. 4 Basic Lesson Plans Activity 1 Design a Straw Rocket I...................................... 5 Activity 2 Design a Straw

More information

LAUNCH IT. DESIGN CHALLENGE Design and build an air-powered rocket that can hit a target at least 5 feet away.

LAUNCH IT. DESIGN CHALLENGE Design and build an air-powered rocket that can hit a target at least 5 feet away. Grades 3 5, 6 8 10 60 minutes LAUNCH IT DESIGN CHALLENGE Design and build an air-powered rocket that can hit a target at least 5 feet away. MATERIALS Supplies and Equipment: Several pairs of scissors Balloon

More information

PRINCIPLES OF FLIGHT

PRINCIPLES OF FLIGHT CHAPTER 3 PRINCIPLES OF FLIGHT INTRODUCTION Man has always wanted to fly. Legends from the very earliest times bear witness to this wish. Perhaps the most famous of these legends is the Greek myth about

More information

Rockets. After School STEM Academy 6-8 th Grade Curriculum

Rockets. After School STEM Academy 6-8 th Grade Curriculum Rockets After School STEM Academy 6-8 th Grade Curriculum Activity 1 ACTIVITY 1: SODA STRAW ROCKET SUMMARY In this activity, you will build and test soda straw rockets just like a NASA engineer. You ll

More information

Fly Rocket Fly Design Report

Fly Rocket Fly Design Report Fly Rocket Fly Design Report The Flying Lady Date: 2016 - December, 21 Maximum Distance: 290 Yards Purpose 1 The purpose of this experiment is to determine the design for a bottle rocket, powered by water,

More information

Exploration Series. HOT AIR BALLOON Interactive Physics Simulation Page 01

Exploration Series.   HOT AIR BALLOON Interactive Physics Simulation Page 01 HOT AIR BALLOON ------- Interactive Physics Simulation ------- Page 01 How do you control a hot air balloon? A hot air balloon floats because atmospheric pressure is greatest closer to the ground. The

More information

H ow To Buil d A Wa ter Rocket

H ow To Buil d A Wa ter Rocket H ow To Buil d A Wa ter Rocket DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT Brainstorm The first step in the design of a water bottle rocket is brainstorming. Brainstorming is a problem-solving technique that involves the spontaneous

More information

ROCKET LABTM. Technology. Fins R Roots! 1. LEARN (First class session)

ROCKET LABTM. Technology. Fins R Roots! 1. LEARN (First class session) Technology Fins R Roots! 1. LEARN (First class session) STEP Objectives Students will learn the purpose of fins. Students will identify the different fin shapes and parts of a fin. Students will construct

More information

Post-Show FLIGHT. After the Show. Traveling Science Shows

Post-Show FLIGHT. After the Show. Traveling Science Shows Traveling Science Shows Post-Show FLIGHT After the Show We recently presented a flight show at your school, and thought you and your students might like to continue investigating this topic. The following

More information

3-2-1 POP! Primary Audience: 3 rd 10 th Grade

3-2-1 POP! Primary Audience: 3 rd 10 th Grade 3-2-1 POP! Primary Audience: 3 rd 10 th Grade Description: Construct a rocket powered by the pressure generated from an effervescing antacid tablet reacting with water. Keywords: Newton s Laws of Motion

More information

How To Build A Water Rocket

How To Build A Water Rocket How To Build A Water Rocket DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT Brainstorm The first step in the design of a water bottle rocket is brainstorming. Brainstorming is a problem-solving technique that involves the spontaneous

More information

Flying High. HHJS Science Week Background Information. Forces and Flight

Flying High. HHJS Science Week Background Information. Forces and Flight Flying High HHJS Science Week 2013 Background Information Forces and Flight Flight Background Information Flying is defined as controlled movement through the air. Many things can become airborne but this

More information

2014 Competition Information & Rules

2014 Competition Information & Rules 2014 Competition Information & Rules Presented by the Florida Engineering Society & the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium Table of Contents General Competition Information 3 Summary of Rule Changes

More information

Exploration Series. MODEL ROCKET Interactive Physics Simulation Page 01

Exploration Series.   MODEL ROCKET Interactive Physics Simulation Page 01 MODEL ROCKET ------- Interactive Physics Simulation ------- Page 01 How high will your model rocket fly? At liftoff, the rocket engine is ignited and a thrust force is generated. The rocket accelerates

More information

This activity also connects to the following standards for Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science:

This activity also connects to the following standards for Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science: Straw Rockets Build and launch a rocket using common classroom materials! This activity is a great demonstration of momentum exchange and aerodynamic forces. Suggested grade level: 3-4 Activity length:

More information

Chapter 6. You lift a 10 N physics book up in the air a distance of 1 meter at a constant velocity of 0.5 m/s. The work done by gravity is

Chapter 6. You lift a 10 N physics book up in the air a distance of 1 meter at a constant velocity of 0.5 m/s. The work done by gravity is I lift a barbell with a mass of 50 kg up a distance of 0.70 m. Then I let the barbell come back down to where I started. How much net work did I do on the barbell? A) - 340 J B) 0 J C) + 35 J D) + 340

More information

BOTTLE ROCKET. What you need to make one

BOTTLE ROCKET. What you need to make one This experiment demonstrates how a built up in pressure can launch a rocket with just water and air. No Jet fuel required because that s just dangerous. Children can construct individual rockets or make

More information

Size: Universal. StratoFins. Screw-on Water Rocket Fins. StratoFins Instructions & Information. Take Your Rocketry To The Next Level

Size: Universal. StratoFins. Screw-on Water Rocket Fins. StratoFins Instructions & Information. Take Your Rocketry To The Next Level Size: Universal StratoFins Screw-on Water Rocket Fins StratoFins Instructions & Information Take Your Rocketry To The Next Level StratoFins Kit Includes: Attachment ring (1) Fins (3) Instruction booklet

More information

LAB 7. ROTATION. 7.1 Problem. 7.2 Equipment. 7.3 Activities

LAB 7. ROTATION. 7.1 Problem. 7.2 Equipment. 7.3 Activities LAB 7. ROTATION 7.1 Problem How are quantities of rotational motion defined? What sort of influence changes an object s rotation? How do the quantities of rotational motion operate? 7.2 Equipment plumb

More information

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Exam Name MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) Hang from a pair of gym rings and the upward support forces of the rings will always

More information

Helicopter & Launcher

Helicopter & Launcher Helicopter & Launcher Category: Physics: Force & Motion Type: Make & Take Rough Parts List: 2 Large craft sticks or paint paddles 12 Dowel, ¼ 1 Dowel, 1 long, ¼ 1 Wood block, 8 x 1 x 1 1 Wood block, tiny

More information

The Physics of Flight. Outreach Program Lesson Plan

The Physics of Flight. Outreach Program Lesson Plan The Physics of Flight Outreach Program Lesson Plan WAAW Foundation is non-profit organization dedicated to bringing hands-on STEM education to girls all over Africa. Our Mission: To increase the pipeline

More information

WONDERLAB: THE EQUINOR GALLERY. The science and maths behind the exhibits 30 MIN INFORMATION. Topic FORCES. Age

WONDERLAB: THE EQUINOR GALLERY. The science and maths behind the exhibits 30 MIN INFORMATION. Topic FORCES. Age WONDERLAB: THE EQUINOR GALLERY and maths s INFORMATION Age 7 11 11 14 Topic FORCES 30 MIN Location LEVEL 3, SCIENCE MUSEUM, LONDON What s the science? What more will you wonder? and maths s Wonderlab:

More information

Rocket Activity Using Dependent and Independent Variables. Constructing the Rocket and Launch System Compressor (LSC)

Rocket Activity Using Dependent and Independent Variables. Constructing the Rocket and Launch System Compressor (LSC) Rocket Activity Using Dependent and Independent Variables This rocket activity is intended to be used with early middle school students. It can be used to illustrate a number of related principles in science

More information

SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY CYCLE 3 MCCAIG ELEMENTARY

SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY CYCLE 3 MCCAIG ELEMENTARY NAME SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY CYCLE 3 MCCAIG ELEMENTARY Air: - colourless, odourless and tasteless, Air and Flight--- Properties of Air - a gas made mainly of nitrogen (78%), oxygen (21%) and small amounts

More information

UNITED KINGDOM ROCKETRY ASSOCIATION STUDY GUIDE SAFETY OFFICERS EXAMINATION AND LEVEL II FLIGHT CERTIFICATION EXAMINATION

UNITED KINGDOM ROCKETRY ASSOCIATION STUDY GUIDE SAFETY OFFICERS EXAMINATION AND LEVEL II FLIGHT CERTIFICATION EXAMINATION UNITED KINGDOM ROCKETRY ASSOCIATION STUDY GUIDE SAFETY OFFICERS EXAMINATION AND LEVEL II FLIGHT CERTIFICATION EXAMINATION Page 1 of 15 This document is published by the Council of the United Kingdom Rocketry

More information

Fly Rocket Fly: Design Lab Report The Zlatan 10W Submitted 12/22/2016 Student: James Hofmann Partner: Manuel Colino Parra Max Distance: 210 yds

Fly Rocket Fly: Design Lab Report The Zlatan 10W Submitted 12/22/2016 Student: James Hofmann Partner: Manuel Colino Parra Max Distance: 210 yds Fly Rocket Fly: Design Lab Report The Zlatan 10W Submitted 12/22/2016 Student: James Hofmann Partner: Manuel Colino Parra Max Distance: 210 yds Purpose 1 Question: What is the best way to design a water

More information

2018 DISTRICT SECME FESTIVAL AND OLYMPIAD COMPETITION RULES SECME: The Gold Standard in STEM

2018 DISTRICT SECME FESTIVAL AND OLYMPIAD COMPETITION RULES SECME: The Gold Standard in STEM WATER-ROCKET VEHICLE COMPETITION While promoting Space Propulsion Awareness, the Water Rocket Competition serves to familiarize students with the basic principles of rocketry, design engineering, and manufacturing

More information

Principles of glider flight

Principles of glider flight Principles of glider flight [ Lecture 2: Control and stability ] Richard Lancaster Email: Richard@RJPLancaster.net Twitter: @RJPLancaster ASK-21 illustrations Copyright 1983 Alexander Schleicher GmbH &

More information

2016 Physics Olympics Detailed Rules

2016 Physics Olympics Detailed Rules 2016 Physics Olympics Detailed Rules The UNT Society of Physics Students has hosted their annual Physics Olympics for many years now. Over the years, many teams have competed in a variety of events that

More information

Agood tennis player knows instinctively how hard to hit a ball and at what angle to get the ball over the. Ball Trajectories

Agood tennis player knows instinctively how hard to hit a ball and at what angle to get the ball over the. Ball Trajectories 42 Ball Trajectories Factors Influencing the Flight of the Ball Nathalie Tauziat, France By Rod Cross Introduction Agood tennis player knows instinctively how hard to hit a ball and at what angle to get

More information

Bicycles 2. Bicycles 1. Bicycles 4. Bicycles 3. Bicycles 5. Bicycles 6

Bicycles 2. Bicycles 1. Bicycles 4. Bicycles 3. Bicycles 5. Bicycles 6 Bicycles 1 Bicycles 2 Reading Question 4.1a How would raising the height of a sport utility vehicle affect its turning stability? A. Make it less likely to tip over B. Make it more likely to tip over C.

More information

5. A bead slides on a curved wire, starting from rest at point A in the figure below. If the wire is frictionless, find each of the following.

5. A bead slides on a curved wire, starting from rest at point A in the figure below. If the wire is frictionless, find each of the following. Name: Work and Energy Problems Date: 1. A 2150 kg car moves down a level highway under the actions of two forces: a 1010 N forward force exerted on the drive wheels by the road and a 960 N resistive force.

More information

The Science of Golf. Test Lab Toolkit The Ball: Aerodynamics. Grades 6-8

The Science of Golf. Test Lab Toolkit The Ball: Aerodynamics. Grades 6-8 The Science of Golf Test Lab Toolkit The Ball: Grades 6-8 Science Technology Engineering Mathematics Table of Contents Welcome to the Test Lab 02 Investigate: Bernoulli s Principle 03 Investigate: Wind

More information

Table of Contents. Career Overview... 4

Table of Contents. Career Overview... 4 Table of Contents Career Overview.................................................. 4 Basic Lesson Plans Hot-Air Balloons Activity 1 Your First Hot-Air Balloon.... 5 Activity 2 Surface Area and Volume...

More information

Fly Rocket Fly: Rocket Report. Hammerhead X 134

Fly Rocket Fly: Rocket Report. Hammerhead X 134 Fly Rocket Fly: Rocket Report Hammerhead X 134 Question: How do you design and test a 2 liter bottle rocket to fly a maximum distance? What kind of things will help the rocket reach a maximum distance?

More information

The Academy of Model Aeronautics ALPHA: Potential Energy Background Information for the Teacher

The Academy of Model Aeronautics ALPHA: Potential Energy Background Information for the Teacher The Academy of Model Aeronautics ALPHA: Potential Energy Background Information for the Teacher When the rubber motor of a model plane is wound it becomes a form of stored potential energy. As the rubber

More information

Created by Glenn Gibson Air and Aerodynamics Flight Note Pack

Created by Glenn Gibson Air and Aerodynamics Flight Note Pack Air and Aerodynamics Flight Note Pack Essential Questions of Aerodynamics The students should be able to answer the following questions: 1. Why does air exert pressure on objects in our atmosphere? 2.

More information

Elementary School Event Descriptions

Elementary School Event Descriptions Elementary School Event Descriptions CRIME BUSTERS A Team Up To: 2 Eye Protection: YES Impound: Time: 40 Minutes 1. DESCRIPTION: Given a scenario, a collection of evidence, and possible suspects, students

More information

STATION 1: HOT WHEELIN PHYSICS 1. Define Newton s First Law. 2. Describe the motion of the untaped washer when the car hits the pencils.

STATION 1: HOT WHEELIN PHYSICS 1. Define Newton s First Law. 2. Describe the motion of the untaped washer when the car hits the pencils. Name Date Period STATION 1: HOT WHEELIN PHYSICS 1. Define Newton s First Law. 2. Describe the motion of the untaped washer when the car hits the pencils. 3. Describe the motion of the taped washer when

More information

The Quarter Pounder A Vehicle to Launch Quarter Pound Payloads to Low Earth Orbit

The Quarter Pounder A Vehicle to Launch Quarter Pound Payloads to Low Earth Orbit The Quarter Pounder A Vehicle to Launch Quarter Pound Payloads to Low Earth Orbit Ed LeBouthillier 1 Contents Introduction... 3 Requirements... 4 Orbital Altitudes... 4 Orbital Velocities... 4 Summary...4

More information

WHAT IS GLIDER? A light engineless aircraft designed to glide after being towed aloft or launched from a catapult.

WHAT IS GLIDER? A light engineless aircraft designed to glide after being towed aloft or launched from a catapult. GLIDER BASICS WHAT IS GLIDER? A light engineless aircraft designed to glide after being towed aloft or launched from a catapult. 2 PARTS OF GLIDER A glider can be divided into three main parts: a)fuselage

More information

Ejection. Boost. Descend WIND. Landing. Takeoff

Ejection. Boost. Descend WIND. Landing. Takeoff INTRODUCTION & OUTLINE Both the parachute and streamer duration are easy and fun to fly events. However, the number of disqualified flights is surprisingly high and the performance of many models resembles

More information

PHYS 101 Previous Exam Problems

PHYS 101 Previous Exam Problems PHYS 101 Previous Exam Problems CHAPTER 14 Fluids Fluids at rest pressure vs. depth Pascal s principle Archimedes s principle Buoynat forces Fluids in motion: Continuity & Bernoulli equations 1. How deep

More information

How to Do Flight Testing for TARC. Trip Barber NAR TARC Manager

How to Do Flight Testing for TARC. Trip Barber NAR TARC Manager How to Do Flight Testing for TARC Trip Barber NAR TARC Manager The TARC Cycle Learn the rules and basic rocketry Design and fly your rocket on the computer Build your rocket to your design with real hardware

More information

6C Science Fair Knowledge

6C Science Fair Knowledge 6C Science Fair Knowledge Our Science Paragraph By: Bella,Heidi and Jasjot Our science fair experiment was if we could study the features of the flying squirrel and how it glides so we could apply that

More information

General Physics Physics 101 Test #1 Fall 2018 Friday 9/21/18 Prof. Bob Ekey

General Physics Physics 101 Test #1 Fall 2018 Friday 9/21/18 Prof. Bob Ekey General Physics Physics 101 Test #1 Fall 2018 Friday 9/21/18 Prof. Bob Ekey Name (print): I hereby declare upon my word of honor that I have neither given nor received unauthorized help on this work. Signature:

More information

ROCKET LABTM. Science. 1. LEARN (First Class Session) Viking Varieties,Wonderful Wizards, Awesome Alphas. Standard A Science as Inquiry

ROCKET LABTM. Science. 1. LEARN (First Class Session) Viking Varieties,Wonderful Wizards, Awesome Alphas. Standard A Science as Inquiry Science 1. LEARN (First Class Session) STEP Viking Varieties,Wonderful Wizards, Awesome Alphas Objectives Students will learn the parts of a model rocket and its flight profile. Students will demonstrate

More information

Rocket Activity Rocket Wind Tunnel

Rocket Activity Rocket Wind Tunnel Rocket Activity Rocket Wind Tunnel Objective Students predict the performance of their air rockets by measuring their streamlining properties. National Science Content Standards Unifying Concepts and Processes

More information

SPACE TRAVEL. Focus: ROCKETS UNDERSTANDING THE BASICS

SPACE TRAVEL. Focus: ROCKETS UNDERSTANDING THE BASICS UNDERSTANDING THE BASICS Rocket engines are different from car engines and steam engines, which produce rotary motion to drive wheels. Rocket engines produce thrust. The reaction of the fuel combusting

More information

POWERED FLIGHT HOVERING FLIGHT

POWERED FLIGHT HOVERING FLIGHT Once a helicopter leaves the ground, it is acted upon by the four aerodynamic forces. In this chapter, we will examine these forces as they relate to flight maneuvers. POWERED FLIGHT In powered flight

More information

Regents Exam Practice: Measurement, Kinematics, Free Fall, PJM, and UCM

Regents Exam Practice: Measurement, Kinematics, Free Fall, PJM, and UCM Regents Exam Practice: Measurement, Kinematics, Free Fall, PJM, and UCM 1. Which quantity and unit are correctly paired? 2. Which is a derived unit? meter second kilogram Newton 3. The fundamental unit

More information

The grade 5 English science unit, Speed, meets the academic content standards set in the Korean curriculum, which state students should:

The grade 5 English science unit, Speed, meets the academic content standards set in the Korean curriculum, which state students should: This unit deals with the speed of objects. Speed is a basic concept used to quantify an object s movement, which can be measured by positional changes over time. It is important to express an object s

More information

Fly Rocket Fly: Design Lab Report

Fly Rocket Fly: Design Lab Report Fly Rocket Fly: Design Lab Report The Zlatan 10W Submitted: December 22nd, 2016 Date submitted : Maximum launch distance : 210 yds PURPOSE Question: What is the best way to make a rocket which is going

More information

Winnipeg Headingley Aero Modellers. Things About Airplanes.

Winnipeg Headingley Aero Modellers. Things About Airplanes. Winnipeg Headingley Aero Modellers Things About Airplanes. Table of Contents Introduction...2 The Airplane...2 How the Airplane is Controlled...3 How the Airplane Flies...6 Lift...6 Weight...8 Thrust...9

More information

Building a Wind Tunnel

Building a Wind Tunnel Technical Report TR-5 Building a Wind Tunnel Estes Industries 1963 These reports are published as a service to its customers by Estes Industries, Inc., Box 227, Penrose, Colorado 81240 Building a Wind

More information

Review - Kinematic Equations

Review - Kinematic Equations Review - Kinematic Equations 1. In an emergency braking exercise, a student driver stops a car travelling at 83 km/h [W] in a time of 4.0 s. What is the car s acceleration during this time? (The answer

More information

THE AIRCRAFT IN FLIGHT Issue /07/12

THE AIRCRAFT IN FLIGHT Issue /07/12 1 INTRODUCTION This series of tutorials for the CIX VFR Club are based on real world training. Each document focuses on a small part only of the necessary skills required to fly a light aircraft, and by

More information

Unit Contents. Chapter 3 Achieving and Maintaining Flight. Chapter 4 Flight Design

Unit Contents. Chapter 3 Achieving and Maintaining Flight. Chapter 4 Flight Design U N I T Flight Amateur cyclist Bryan Allen had never dreamed of becoming a pilot. But on June 12, 1979, the cyclist did just that. In addition to piloting the plane, he also provided the fuel for the first

More information

ANSWER KEY Station #1: Clothespin Lab

ANSWER KEY Station #1: Clothespin Lab ANSWER KEY Station #1: Clothespin Lab 1. Using the string, tie the ends of the clothespin so that the clothespin is open. 2. Place the cookie sheet, upside-down, on the floor. 3. Place the tied clothespin

More information

Name. University of Maryland Department of Physics

Name. University of Maryland Department of Physics Name University of Maryland Department of Physics Exam 1 (Makeup) 14. October. 2010 Instructions: Do not open this examination until the proctor tells you to begin. 1. When the proctor tells you to begin,

More information

Structure (Down plane)

Structure (Down plane) By Lauren Russell Structure (Down plane) The body (toes, knees, hips, wrists and shoulders) is aligned parallel to the intended target line. The torso is tilted over the ball from the hips whilst maintaining

More information

Kinematics-Projectiles

Kinematics-Projectiles 1. A volleyball hit into the air has an initial speed of 10 meters per second. Which vector best represents the angle above the horizontal that the ball should be hit to remain in the air for the greatest

More information

A child places a car of mass 95 g on the track. She adjusts the controller to a power of 4.2 W so the car accelerates from rest for 0.40 s.

A child places a car of mass 95 g on the track. She adjusts the controller to a power of 4.2 W so the car accelerates from rest for 0.40 s. 1 The picture shows a track for racing toy electric cars. A guide pin fits in a groove in the track to keep the car on the track. A small electric motor in the car is controlled, with a hand-controller,

More information

Lab 9 Ballistic Pendulum

Lab 9 Ballistic Pendulum b Lab 9 Ballistic Pendulum What You Need To Know: The Physics Today s lab is not going to cover any new physics. However, based on what you ve learned in lecture and in lab, we will be combining together

More information

Fun Physics Workshop

Fun Physics Workshop Name: University of Cape Town Department of Physics Fun Physics Workshop Equipment checklist. Each group should get the following: 2 tins, saucer, beaker, straws, 2 balloons, tube, wooden balance, 2 weights,

More information

THE CLASSIC COLLECTION

THE CLASSIC COLLECTION THE CLASSIC COLLECTION model rocketry THE EDUCATIONAL SPACE-AGE HOBBY Table of Contents Technical Report TR-1, Rocket Stability...1 Technical Report TR-2, Multi-Staging...3 Technical Report TR-3, Altitude

More information

Grandpa's Homemade Rocket for About a Dollar!

Grandpa's Homemade Rocket for About a Dollar! Grandpa's Homemade Rocket for About a Dollar! Grandpa and Granny Co. 2012 The most common items needed: (The number of Rocket parts from each item is before the parts name and its proportionate cost is

More information

Unit conversions: 9. An defensive lineman weighs 330 pounds. What is his mass in kg (given 2.2 pounds = 1 kg)? 330 lb 1 kg. 2.2 lb 10.

Unit conversions: 9. An defensive lineman weighs 330 pounds. What is his mass in kg (given 2.2 pounds = 1 kg)? 330 lb 1 kg. 2.2 lb 10. Practice exam semester 1 physics Walk this Way Activity, Graph Sketching and Recognition, Sonic Ranger Lab: Use the graph to the right for q s 1-3 1. Which object(s) is (are) not moving? 2. Which change

More information

Fin Shape Science Experiment Kit

Fin Shape Science Experiment Kit Kit #00524 Fin Shape Science Experiment Kit Test Different Fin Shapes to Find Out Which One Performs the Best! P/N Description Qty 10079 AT-18/5.4 (Fin Shape Sci Eng. Mount Tube) 1 10118 AT-33/3 (Payload

More information

Fly Rocket Fly: Design Lab Report. Rocket Name: Wavehog Willie 12/21/16

Fly Rocket Fly: Design Lab Report. Rocket Name: Wavehog Willie 12/21/16 Fly Rocket Fly: Design Lab Report Rocket Name: Wavehog Willie 12/21/16 Table of Contents 1.Title Page 2.Purpose 3.Question 4. 5. 6. 7. 8 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14, 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Purpose Question:

More information

Building a Rocket (Advanced) Before you build a rocket try the bottle on the launcher to test if it holds pressure and fits correctly.

Building a Rocket (Advanced) Before you build a rocket try the bottle on the launcher to test if it holds pressure and fits correctly. You Will Need 3X 2ltr Bottles 1X Paper lip 1X Glue/Double Sided Tape 1X ardboard 1X Bin Liner 1X Roll of Fishing Line or Thin s Sheets of Paper Side A of Fin 1X Hot Glue Gun 1X Pair of Scissors 1X Fine

More information