OVERLAND PARK AND MISSION

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1 OVERLAND PARK AND MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility: Pedestrian and Bike Improvements Johnson County, Kansas July 2013 MISSION OVERLAND PARK

2 How to use this document This document captures the process and outcomes from the creation of bike and pedestrian plans for the downtowns in Overland Park and Mission, Kansas conducted along with the Mid America Regional Council from Fall 2012 through Summer The objective of this planning effort is to develop a toolbox and strategies to improve the bike and pedestrian facilities of each downtown. With this toolbox the cities can guide and shape efforts to develop downtowns that welcome all transportation modes and contribute to a vibrant and sustainable place. Acknowledgements Dean Katerndahl Mid America Regional Council Jeff Hirt Mid America Regional Council Doug Johnson Overland Park Danielle Murray Mission, Kansas Cover Images: Photos from the existing downtown streetscapes in Mission and Overland Park, OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

3 Table of Contents INTRODUCTION & BACKGROUND... 5 Enhancing Downtown Accessibility...6 Previous Plans and Studies:...10 Community Engagement:...13 STRATEGIES Creating an Inviting Walking Environment...16 Welcoming Bikes Downtown...24 Intersection Improvements EXISTING CONDITIONS Biking and Walking in Downtown Overland Park...41 Biking and Walking in Mission...44 RECOMMENDATIONS IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES Implementation...62 Funding Strategies...62 APPENDIX Keypad Polling and Online Survey Results...68 Map Activity...84 Bike and Pedestrian Level of Service

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5 2 INTRODUCTION & BACKGROUND Introduction & Background 5

6 Enhancing Downtown Accessibility The Cities of Overland Park and Downtown Mission, in conjunction with the Mid-America Regional Council (MARC), undertook a study beginning in the fall of 2012 to implement strategies to create bike and pedestrian friendly downtowns. The goal of this plan and the recommendations enclosed is to improve safety and access for all modes of travel with an emphasis on bicycle and pedestrian facilities. This effort is part of MARC s Creating Sustainable Places Initiative ( CSP ) to create a more sustainable Kansas City region. This effort aims to help local communities plan for better designed development and more successful local neighborhoods and districts throughout the metropolitan area over the next few decades. Both cities have an opportunity to improve their established downtown areas to facilitate more transit oriented development in order to leverage the presence of enhanced transit services along Metcalf and Shawnee Mission Parkway. Walking and Biking: Walkability and bikeability is the extent to which the built environment supports and encourages each activity by providing enhanced safety, choice, and comfort. Walking and biking are sustainable modes of transportation that reduce congestion, conserve energy and reduce emissions. Beyond utilitarian trips for work, school or shopping, walking and biking can also be outlets for recreation and healthy living. In the public meetings with Overland Park and Mission many citizens were interested in both walking and biking for both utilitarian and recreation trips. The design of the street, landscaping and the built environment contribute to downtown identity, safety, community interaction, and the promotion of bicycling and walking. Vision and Goals: The objective of this process was to develop a tool box for the downtown areas to facilitate improved bike and pedestrian environments and in turn more vibrant and connected communities. The project examines the potential for future bicycle facilities (bicycle routes, bicycle lanes, bicycle storage etc.) and strategies to improve pedestrian access and safety (including crosswalks, improved sidewalks, etc.) into and around the two downtown areas. Great Streets: Great Streets allow people to walk more comfortably and safely and contribute to the economic vitality of the local community. They are functionally complete for a variety of modes of travel (including, walking, biking, and transit), facilitate placemaking, support more environmentally friendly development, and serve all modes of travel. Why improve downtown biking and walking infrastructure? Improving safety, increasing connections, and enhancing the desirability of walking and biking has many positive impacts including: Reducing emissions, Increasing transportation choice, Reducing congestion, and businesses, Enhancing the sense of community, and Increasing quality of life. Improving bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure in each community will diversify transportation options to meet the needs of all community members. This effort will lay the foundation for each city to prioritize future improvements and then proceed with detailed planning and construction over time to achieve active and inviting downtown environments that balance and support all modes of travel. 6 Introduction & Background OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

7 Process: 1. Project Start-up: The project start-up phase included a kick off meeting with the steering committee representing members of each city s staff and MARC staff. In the project start up phase the vision and goals were outlined to guide research, analysis, and recommendations for the Downtown Pedestrian and Bike Accessibility Study. 2. Existing Conditions Inventory, Site Visits and Analysis: The consultant team spent time in both cities making inventory of sidewalks and bicycling infrastructure was completed for both Overland Park and Mission. A Level of Service analysis was used to develop an objective measure of the current biking and walking conditions along some of the main routes in each downtown. This level of service analysis is important to help understand how it feels to walk or bicycle on the roadways. This analysis can also help identify opportunities for the addition of bicycle or pedestrian features. 3. Public Outreach and Opinion Gathering: Engaging the public was a critical part of the study to help facilitate an understanding of the community s values and priority issues for walking and biking in each community. A joint public open house was held in October 2012 for residents and interested members of the public to join in the planning process through keypad polling and mapping activities where participants provided their input concerning priorities, key destinations, and preferred strategies. The questions from the meeting were also posted online for those who could not attend the night of the meeting. 4. Tool Box & Draft Recommendations: With input from the public outreach process and the existing conditions analysis a tool box of bike and pedestrian improvements appropriate for Downtown Overland Park and Downtown Mission was created. The client team had small group meetings with stakeholders to gain further insight into the ideas and suggestions for improving biking and walking. 5. Final Tool Box and Recommendations: This phase involved / public meeting was held on June 18th, 2013 to review the recommendations. How this study will be used: This document provides a visual and textual story of the design environments of Overland Park and Mission. It is intended for the municipalities to use the document to guide future planning efforts and to prioritize projects that will have the most impact in the short and long term. Reasons for Improving Walking and Biking Facilities: Recent studies have shown that communities that invest in walking and biking infrastructure have higher property values, create new jobs, increase business at local establishments, attract tourists, and congestion and commute times, as well as improved air quality and public health. (Alliance for Biking & Walking 2012 Benchmarking report) The proximity of the two downtowns, where retail and commercial uses are dominant, to nearby residential neighborhoods offers opportunities for residents to access work or shopping by walking or cycling, leaving their cars at home, or opting not to have one at all. Other communities have shown that, when bicycle and pedestrian facilities are developed connecting residential areas with local destinations and activity centers, they are well used. Increasing interest in healthy life styles, the high costs of motorized contribute to the desirability of biking and walking routes within and between each community. Case Study: Pedestrian improvements encourage residents to frequent local shops. One exemplary project was a $4.5 million public-private pedestrian-oriented project in Downtown Lodi, California. street blocks with widened sidewalks, bulb-outs at intersections, and other improvements for their economic turnaround in which vacancy rates dropped from 18 to 6 percent. After completion, the city witnessed a 30% increase in downtown sales tax revenue (Local Government Commission 2000). Introduction & Background 7

8 Figure 1: Context Map and Downtown Area Boundaries: Waterfall Hickory Park Hills North Park W 55TH ST Broadmoor Park Nall Cooper Creek Vavra Park JOHNSON DR Crestview Park MARTWAY DR LAMAR AVE Anderson Park W 67TH ST SHAWNEE MISSION PKY ANTIOCH RD Antioch Park Antioch Acres Park Milburn Milburn Country Country Club Club SANTA FE DR Marty Park METCALF AV W 71ST ST W 75TH ST and Overland Park Mohawk Park Downtown Mission Prairie View Park NALL AVE W 63RD ST TOMAHAWK RD ROE AVE Porter Park Youngs Park Antioch Square Park Downtown Overland Park SANTA FE DR LOWELL ST Santa a Fe Commons Metcalf Av W 80TH ST W 79TH ST W 83RD ST Bennet Park Investing in bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure is W 79TH ST not only affordable, it creates jobs, stimulates local economies, increases property values, and W 83RD ST health, air quality, and quality of life. (Alliance for Biking & Walking 2012 Benchmarking report) 8 Introduction & Background OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

9 Community Context: Overland Park and Mission enjoy competitive advantages in Johnson County over other suburban areas in the metropolitan area. Johnson County continues to report the strongest growth in population and households within the metro area, and the downtown inner ring suburbs in the metropolitan area. The two communities proximity to planned regional transit improvements add to the importance of improving the walking and biking conditions and connections for each of the downtowns as redevelopment and growth occurs. Overland Park: Downtown Overland Park continues to redevelop over time. A new transit stop was constructed in the spring of 2013 along Marty Street to serve Johnson County s bus service, The JO, with additional plans for a second transit stop in front of the Matt Ross Community Center. There are plans for additional retail and residential development in the downtown district, particularly along 80th Street and along Santa Fe Drive. The Overland Park Farmers Market attracts shoppers from throughout Johnson County and the Santa Fe area is emerging as a popular local restaurant district. Within all of these changes lie opportunities to integrate bike and pedestrian improvements that foster a more vibrant and active downtown. Mission: Downtown Mission is undertaking a number of projects to encourage an improved downtown district along Johnson Drive, which has historically served as a highway route, giving the area an auto centric feel rather than serving as a pedestrian destination. The City of Mission has already completed bike and pedestrian improvements in recent years and has other projects in progress, including construction of the Rock Creek Trail (a separated walking and biking path) that traverses through the downtown area, and the upcoming completion of streetscape improvements along Johnson Drive and street upgrades to Martway, west of Woodson. As these improvements help to spur ongoing downtown revitalization Lamar, and the various north-south side streets in the downtown vicinity, this plan will help the city identify ongoing improvements to the environment for people walking and biking in the area. Items outlined in this plan should tie with redevelopment projects development. Introduction & Background 9

10 Previous Plans and Studies: SmartMoves: Regional Transit Plan Regional Plans: Metcalf Avenue and Shawnee Mission Parkway Transit Planning Study: The Metcalf Avenue and Shawnee Mission Parkway Corridors have plans in place that build on the SmartMoves regional studies to revitalize these areas through land use changes and increased densities. The two corridors have opportunities to develop as critical transit corridors with enhanced service. JOHNSON DRIVE SHAWNEE MISSION PARKWAY I 35 ANTIOCH RD Antioch Park SANTA FE DR METCALF AVE LAMAR AVE Downtown Mission Mohawk Park NALL AVE Transit (BRT) recommended in the near term along Metcalf, Johnson Drive and Shawnee Mission Parkway. In the long term the study recommends a BRT that would have dedicated travel lanes and stops located along a center median or a Center Running Center Loading, two way BRT from Downtown Overland Park to Johnson Drive in Mission and a Side Running Side Loading, one way BRT along Johnson Drive. Metcalf Avenue/Shawnee Mission Parkway Transit Improvements A $10.7 million TIGER grant is currently funding transit improvements in both cities including 18 transit stops, two park and ride facilities, pedestrian access improvements along Metcalf Avenue from 87th Street to College Boulevard (including a new multi-use trail along the east side of the road), a transit signal priority system, and the new transit center in Downtown Mission. 75TH ST 79TH ST Antioch Acres Park Youngs Park SANTA FE DR Milburn Country Club LOWELL ST Marty Park Downtown Overland Park 83RD ST Smartmoves Proposed Transit Routes Service Mode Commuter Major Fixed Route During the course of this study the 80th Street and Marty Enhanced Transit stop in front of the Farmers Market was completed with branding to distinguish enhanced services. In Mission enhanced transit stops are included in the grant at Martway and Broadmoor and at Martway and the Sylvester Powell Community Center. An enhanced transit station was recently completed at Roe Avenue and Johnson Drive. The East Gateway Transit Center at 5251 Johnson Drive is included in the City of Mission s East Gateway Plan. Urban Existing Transit Routes Primary Study Area Parks F 10 Introduction & Background OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

11 City Plans: Overland Park: Vision Metcalf (Fall 2007) Vision Metcalf is a long range study of the Metcalf corridor providing recommendations for land use, multi-modal transportation options, urban design and streetscape elements. The vision plan calls for Bus with a stop located two blocks from Downtown Overland Park. The plan calls for higher population densities and employment concentrations than what currently exists. Downtown Overland Park Form Based Code: In realizing the recommendations of Vision Metcalf, the City of Overland Park approved the Downtown Form Plan) with a focus on the form of buildings and their relationship to the street to create a mix of uses in a walkable environment. This Code provides more detailed guidance for the downtown area than the Citywide comprehensive plan. The code includes Urban- Space Standards that set the parameters for street trees, sidewalks, and other amenities within the public for travel lanes, curb radii, and on-street parking. Mission Mission Comprehensive Plan (2007, with 2011 amendments): The Mission Comprehensive Plan is a city-wide plan for parks, transportation, economic development and land use for the City of Mission. One of the primary planning principles for the city is to elevate multi-modal transportation to an equal footing with the traditional status of automobile transportation and to identify goals to meet the walking and bicycle needs of the community. Some applicable objectives and strategies of the plan include the following: The creation of incentives for rights-of-way dedication and easements for alternative transportation modes throughout the city. Including community investment plans for alternative transportation modes in the city-wide Community Investment Program (CIP). The creation of policy standards to evaluate and weigh alternative transportation improvements as compared to auto-oriented improvements. Support for bicycle travel on the part of the City by considering joining the Bicycle Friendly Community Program of the League of American Bicyclists and participating in the regional efforts to create bicycle transportation corridors that connect with Mission. Drive to the west of Lamar Avenue as Bicycle Facility Corridors. In regards to improved walkability, Johnson Drive, 58th Street, Martway, Nall, and 61st Street are supports the City of Mission Climate Action Plan by offering loans or awards to businesses making energy The plan addresses land use and the character of the Downtown district with the goal of maintaining a historic downtown that includes small businesses and a pedestrian-oriented environment. It emphasizes the retention or development of spaces within Downtown Johnson Drive Rehabilitation Project In August, 2012 City Council approved the design concept for full streetscape enhancements along Johnson Drive from Lamar to Nall. Construction began in June, 2013 with the relocation of utilities. The infrastructure improvements include the removal and replacement of all curbs and gutters, full-depth base repair in some locations, mill and overlay of surfaces, repair or replacement of catch basins, widened sidewalks and improved curb ramps, and a reconstructed drainage system. Pedestrian enhancements include the addition of user-actuated to pedestrians waiting to cross the street, overhead pedestrian hybrid beacons at key crossings, and speed tables. In February, 2013, construction of street improvements on Martway began, including the replacement of the box bridge under the Martway/ Woodson intersection, new surface asphalt, installation Woodson, as well as sidewalk, stormwater and other infrastructure improvements. East Gateway Redevelopment Plan (2006): The East Gateway Redevelopment Plan focuses on redeveloping the area to the north and east of Nall Avenue and Shawnee Mission Parkway. The plan sets a vision for Martway to become a parkway, improving its appearance and function as the primary vehicular and pedestrian route in the East Gateway district. The plan includes recommendations for roadway Introduction & Background 11

12 realignments to improve the grid network of primary and secondary streets to create a safer and more uniform network of intersections and pedestrian crossings. Broadmoor Street Simulation from the West Gateway Vision Plan, City of Mission, KS West Gateway Vision Plan and Form Based Code (2006): The West Gateway Vision Plan proposes changes to the area to the north and east of Metcalf Avenue and Shawnee Mission Parkway to accommodate BRT as a key element of redevelopment in addition to pedestrian-friendly streets, innovative parking strategies, a wide range of building types and signature parks. The purpose of the guidelines enclosed in the plan is to make the roadways more consistent from Metcalf to Lamar and present a more pedestrian friendly streetscape to enhance Johnson Drive s status as Mission s rather than the automobile, with land uses and scale of buildings pass through the area, including: A regional boulevard system in which the two major thoroughfares, Metcalf and Shawnee Mission Parkway, are converted from limited access highways to regional urban boulevards with landscaped medians to provide safer pedestrian crossings, two travel lanes, and swales to reduce stormwater runoff into the Rock Creek Basin. Five main avenues including Martway, 61st Street, 58th Street, Barkley, and some newly created streets that will incorporate larger sidewalks and enhanced landscaping, two 11-foot travel lanes, on-street parking, and bike lanes and signage directed towards non-motorized travel. Two way streets which serve as connectors and support pedestrian movement through landscaping, wide sidewalks, and bulb-outs at intersections. 12 Introduction & Background OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

13 Community Engagement: A public open house was held on October 29, 2012 to inform the communities of Overland Park and Mission about the Creating Sustainable Places project and identify their priorities and preferences for improving the biking and walking conditions of each downtown. Who we heard from: A total of 51 people participated in the October meeting and participated in a keypad polling session that included a variety of survey questions. In addition, 19 people completed an on-line version of the survey presented at the October public meeting. Overland Park residents accounted for almost half of the responses to the survey questions, with Mission residents representing 16 percent of completed surveys. The remainder of the participants hailed from elsewhere in Johnson County and the Kansas City metropolitan area. Most of the participants in the surveys were business patrons, commuters, or nearby residents of Downtown Overland Park or Downtown Mission. Property owners in or near the two downtown districts accounted for only 6 to 7 percent of survey respondents. Summary of Community Feedback: Downtown Overland Park Plan Priorities: Identifying designated bike routes, providing bike lanes, and providing wider sidewalks and space for outdoor dining were the top three things participants considered to be the most important for the Downtown Overland Park Bike and Pedestrian Plan. Participants indicated that improving the balance of transportation options between cars, buses, and pedestrians, and maintaining a broad and eclectic mix of locally owned and operated businesses, were important in ensuring the long term success of Downtown Overland Park. Biking: Participants indicated that the lack of facilities for bicyclists represented the most concerning transportation issue in Downtown Overland Park. Participants also expressed support for integrating on-street bike lanes into the design of downtown streets and indicated that the most important destinations to access by bike in the district included the Matt Ross Community Center, the Overland Park Farmers Market, and downtown shopping areas (including Santa Fe and 80th). For Downtown Overland Park, participants noted that identifying downtown as a distinctive and unique area and installing or enhancing signage guiding people to key civic and community destinations stood out as top priorities. Walking: The most popular options to improve the pedestrian environment in Downtown Aesthetics: 70% of the participants rated the overall appearance of Downtown Overland Park as Good or Very Good. Road Sections: The project team presented a variety of options for the future design of particular streets within Downtown Overland Park to the public at the initial public meeting. The design options illustrated at the meeting included strategies to widen sidewalks, to add sharrows or bike lanes, to convert angled parking to parallel parking in order to provide for improved bike access, or to maintain the existing street sections and geometries. The public supported options designed to widen sidewalks and to install sharrows for bicycle access on the roadway. Around 50 percent of respondents also supported adding bike lanes along Marty Street. Introduction & Background 13

14 Downtown Mission Plan Priorities: Participants at the October meeting noted that the three most important considerations in completing the Downtown Mission Bike and Pedestrian Plan include designating bike routes, providing dedicated bike lanes, and improving sidewalks and crosswalks that connect surrounding neighborhoods to downtown. Biking: For Downtown Mission, participants noted that the lack of facilities for bicycles represented the most critical transportation issue facing the district. The survey revealed that the integration of on-street bike lanes on downtown streets ranked as the most important bike-related issue in the downtown. The most popular and important locations to access by bike, as noted in the survey responses, included the Sylvester Powell Community Center, the Mission Transit Center on Johnson Drive, Andersen Park, and the HyVee shopping center. Walking: The most popular options to enhance the pedestrian environment in Downtown Mission included adding bulb-outs to reduce crossing distances, and improving sidewalk surfaces throughout the district. Aesthetics: Only seven percent of participants, in both the in-person meeting and the online survey, rated the existing appearance of Downtown Mission as good, and over 50 percent of respondents rated the appearance of the district as poor or very poor. Participants rated identifying downtown as a distinctive and unique area, and installing or enhancing signage to key civic and community destinations, as Mission district. Road Sections: The project team provided a variety of street section options for Lamar as it passes through Downtown Mission, including designs for widening sidewalks, installing sharrows, or for maintaining the existing street section. The public expressed the greatest support for a design for Lamar that would include providing sharrows for bikers along the street. Participants priorities for the Downtown Bike and Pedestrian Plans in Overland Park and Mission: Identify designated bike routes Provide dedicated bike lanes Improve sidewalks and crosswalks connections Improve public open spaces Improve bicycle safety Provide wider sidewalks and space for outdoor dining Mission Overland Park Improve crosswalks in the downtown area Provide increased site furniture Improve connections to local businesses Other 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 14 Introduction & Background OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

15 3 STRATEGIES Improving Walking and Biking Downtown Strategies 15

16 Strategies to Create an Inviting Walking Environment A downtown should be safe, comfortable and inviting for people walking to and through downtown. The following is a tool box of strategies that can help contribute to a better walking environment for each community. Generally speaking, many communities have demonstrated that updating a street to better accommodate pedestrians and bikers often does not impact vehicle capacity yet can encourage slower speeds and improved safety, generating more pedestrian activity. Sidewalks Sidewalks are a key feature in any successful downtown. These separated pedestrian lanes allow people walking along the streets window shopping or dining opportunities that encourage and foster community interaction. Details such as the width of the sidewalk, surface materials, shade and amenities contribute to a walkable environment. Prioritizing the movement of pedestrians along sidewalks, at junctions with intersecting driveways, can improve safety and the overall environment encountered by pedestrians. A Complete Sidewalk Network A complete sidewalk network will allow residents and visitors to comfortably walk to their destinations and encourage people to move around Downtown Overland Park and Downtown Mission on foot. Sidewalks should be provided on both sides of the roadway throughout each downtown core. Connectivity A successful network is well-connected for pedestrians. Sidewalks should link with other modes of travel including public transit to increase the opportunities for mixing travel modes. Internal connectivity addresses the circulation within the study areas of the two downtowns, whereas external connectivity looks at the connections to adjacent neighborhoods and minimizing existing barriers, such as busy or intimidating intersections, to ensure that residents and visitors can access downtown. Green strategies such as permeable pavers can help improve the pedestrian experience. Sidewalk Priority at Driveway Crossings and Parking Lots: Typical driveways and parking lots throughout both downtowns are currently designed to prioritize the motorist with sidewalks often coming to an end on either side, leaving the pedestrian to navigate Priority should be given to the pedestrian by eliminating grade changes and creating a continuous level walkway, allowing for easier travel and slower turning movements for vehicles. Source: - Institute of Transportation Engineers Sidewalk Priority at driveways and alleys can enhance the pedestrian feel and safety of Downtown. Limited Curb Cuts Curb cuts increase the danger to pedestrians using the sidewalks exiting the driveways and pedestrians crossing. In general, 16 Strategies OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

17 driveways and curb cuts should be consolidated to reduce the number of entrances per block and create a safer and more enjoyable pedestrian experience. However, where curb cuts are necessary they should create a smooth transition and prioritize the sidewalk where possible by maintaining a level sidewalk surface and requiring the driveway to slope up to the sidewalk rather than bringing the sidewalk down to the level of the road. 6 Composite Crash Index (per mile) 7.2 Buffered Sidewalks Designs that include a landscaped buffer in the areas between sidewalks and streets help to enhance the feeling of safety and comfort as well as improve the overall aesthetic appearance of local streets. These kinds of buffers can provide an added sense of safety or enclosure for people who are sitting or walking within the sidewalk zone. The landscape buffer areas may also include bike rack facilities that provide an added buffer between vehicles on adjacent streets and pedestrians. A landscape buffer of a in Overland Park and Mission is recommended. Street trees should be planted with the landscaped buffer a distance of three feet from the face of the curb. Crashes Access Points (per mile) Sidewalk Width Sidewalks within the downtown areas on busy retail streets with pedestrian activity would ideally be 16 to 20 feet in width, allowing for a minimum four foot wide pedestrian clear zone (with six feet being ideal) and a pedestrian amenity zone or places where restaurants can host sidewalk sales or outdoor dining. Where space is constrained in the downtown business areas, sidewalks of 10 feet in width are desirable on streets with more pedestrian activity. In areas where pedestrian activity is not as prevalent sidewalks should be a minimum of eight to 10 feet in width where they come right up to the street and six to eight feet in width if they are separated from the street by a planting strip or buffer. The likelihood of crashes taking place goes up as the number of driveways and parking lot entrances or access points increases. Sidewalk Condition and Surface: Sidewalks should have a smooth surface to ensure safety and comfort for walkers as well as people traveling via wheelchairs or strollers. Paths should be maintained to be cleared of snow and encroaching plants or other impediments to sidewalk users. hydrants, benches and other street furniture should be located so they do not obstruct the pedestrian clear zone; ideally they should be located in the amenity zone or grouped out of the way of pedestrians. Porous pavement or concrete is a low impact streetscape improvement that can help manage stormwater by increasing the permeability of the surfaces. Often the right of way between building faces is comprised of 99 percent impervious surfaces. Identifying appropriate opportunities such as sidewalks and onstreet parking spaces where porous parking can be used can help alleviate pressure on conventional stormwater management systems. Strategies 17

18 Sidewalk Zones Figures 2 and 3 show two options for enhancing pedestrian focused areas within each downtown. Figure 2 demonstrates the use of silva cell technology with permeable paving and ADA compliant tree grates that extend the functional portion of the sidewalk while also allowing for healthier street trees and other pedestrian amenities that are important for a vibrant and comfortable experience. Figure 2: Constrained Sidewalk Conditions for Downtown Areas From branches to the sidewalk Permeable Paving ADA Compliant Tree Grate Soil Structure (Ex. Silva Cells) On Street Parking Planting / Amenity Zone Walkway Clear Zone 5 Minimum Building Edge Buffer Active Ground Floor Uses in Buildings Constrained Sidewalk Width: Strategies OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

19 Figure 3 illustrates the ideal sidewalk section where ample space is provided for a planting / amenity zone, clear space for pedestrians, and the potential for outdoor dining or other retail uses. Figure 3: Ideal Sidewalk Conditions for Downtown Areas From branches to the sidewalk Minimum 3 On Street Parking Clear Zone Planting / Amenity Zone Walkway 5 Minimum Retail / Dining Zone Active Ground Floor Uses in Buildings Ideal Sidewalk Width: 16 to 20 Strategies 19

20 Pedestrian Amenities The context of the built environment includes the elements that make a place visually interesting including the design and scale amenities that are provided including lighting, street trees and seating. Soil Volume Ideally trees within the downtown should have 1,000 cubic feet of soil volume which provides over 800 times more volume for root growth to support healthy trees than typical 4x4 foot tree pits in many urban environments. Street Trees Street trees can provide economic, environmental, physical, consistent tree canopy provides a shaded respite from the sun, areas of visual interest, and seasonal change as well as positive impacts on perceived pedestrian safety. Urban street trees reduce pollutants in stormwater runoff and in the air, mitigate stormwater runoff, sequester carbon, raise property values, and reduce energy costs. Each downtown should strive to reach a minimum of 15 percent tree canopy coverage within the study area as recommended by the Davey Resource Group. The best practices to encourage optimal street tree growth are detailed in the book, Up By Roots, Healthy Soils and Trees in the Built Environment by James Urban. Strategies for healthy street trees include: Planting trees feet apart. Providing a minimum of 100 square feet of sidewalk opening for each tree to ensure oxygen and nutrient availability. Providing a minimum of 1,000 cubic feet of planting soil for each tree. Tree species should be selected that will branch out at and to ensure that ground level signage for businesses remains unobstructed from the opposite side of the roadway. Tree Canopy National research suggests that successful downtowns plan for a tree canopy of at least 15%. An increase in street trees and shaded areas can increase property values, provide for energy savings and improve air quality, as well as help absorb rainfall and reduce stormwater runoff. Healthier and more abundant street trees can improve the overall appearance of downtown. average, individual commercial property $On values will increase annually by about $300 for each tree located in front of a property. Silva Cells In constrained circumstances, silva cells combined with suspended porous pavement can be used to provide room to grow healthy shade trees without taking up valuable sidewalk space. 20 Strategies OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

21 Silva Cells and Suspended Paving Suspended paving planting areas provide space for roots to grow underneath the sidewalk surface utilizing silva cell technology and achieving the dual benefits of larger trees while not impeding on the pedestrian walking space, which can be useful in constrained areas. Silva cells and suspended porous pavement technologies support larger and healthier trees by allowing the roots to expand underneath the sidewalk or roadway. Healthier trees provide a better canopy of shade and improved environmental services such as heat island reduction, stormwater management, and air filtration. Image Source: deeproot.com 4 Caliper with 1000 cubic foot Planting Area This is an example of silva cell and suspended, porous paving used in a plaza space. Street trees help to improve the aesthetic appeal and walkability of downtown in addition to supporting a healthy environment Strategies 21

22 Lighting Pedestrian scale lighting is an amenity that can enhance the physical safety of people traveling at night, as well as safety from crime. Walkers are most comfortable with street level lighting that is bright enough to illuminate faces, pavement obstacles and changes in sidewalk levels. Lighting features are also used to provide visual for future streetscape improvements to limit the amount of light trespass that occurs and the negative impacts on wildlife and glare and in order to generate energy savings in the long run. Light poles should direct most of their light downward so that it is not wasted in illuminating the sky. Pedestrian scale lighting is important to enhance safety and comfort. Seating Providing adequate benches throughout the downtown core enables people an opportunity to rest when needed and enjoy the activity around them. Given the presence in the local area of an active but aging population that may enjoy walking to do errands and may not feel as comfortable driving (as time passes), providing seating in the Downtown Overland Park and Downtown Mission areas is important. Benches should be provided at a minimum of one every block with additional benches to be installed where there are high volumes of pedestrians. In addition, benches should be provided at key community destinations such as community centers and transit stops. Energy-efficient LED luminaire with contemporary feel Benches on every block can provide opportunities for community interaction. 22 Strategies Visual Interest: Paving patterns add visual interest and contribute to the identities of each downtown. In addition, locating building fronts up to the sidewalk edge and designing for buildings with transparent and interesting facades helps to encourage walking in the downtown areas. The communities should work to encourage the inclusion of in order to further encourage additional pedestrian activity. Seating Seating is an important part of vibrant public spaces. It allows pedestrians to rest, socialize, read and people-watch. New York City Plaza Design Standards recommend one linear foot of seating for every 21 linear feet of street frontage or 2 to 3 benches per 300 feet of building frontage. Trash Receptacles Trash bins and recycling bins should be placed on each street corner and at mid-block within higher plaza areas. As more people visit downtown it is important that bins are convenient and accessible for people as they walk through downtown to shops and character of the streetscape. OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

23 Activating the Streets Extended Intersection or Mid-Block Curb Extensions and reducing crosswalk distances, can also provide additional space for outdoor dining and pedestrian or bike amenities such as bike parking. Given the limited right-of-way of streets in the two downtown areas and the need to retain or add curb side parking, providing extended bulb-outs at intersections or at key locations in the middle of blocks can provide additional space for pedestrian amenities or mini-plazas. This strategy can help to enhance the pedestrian experience without the cost of moving curbs and utilities. Parklets A parklet is a small seasonal or temporary public gathering space created by converting a few on-street parking spaces into a minipark or spaces for restaurants to use for outdoor dining during warm spring and summer months. By re-purposing two or three parking stalls along a block into an area with seating and landscaping, pedestrians have new opportunities to relax, drink a cup of coffee, catch up with friends and enjoy downtown. The average cost of a parklet is around $15,000 and can be undertaken by either the private or public sectors. In some cities, business owners pay for the permit and construction of each parklet. Cities like Philadelphia and Chicago have created guidelines to help business owners acquire the proper permits and build parklets on their blocks. These mini plazas or dining areas can help to bring interest and activity sidewalks along the whole block. Streets are activated by outdoor dining. A few parking spaces lend themselves to a permanent curb expansion providing more pedestrian amenity space for benches and trees. Juda Street Parklet, Photo by San Francisco Planning Dept San Francisco s parklet program has led the way for many large and small cities throughout the country. Strategies 23

24 Strategies to Welcome Bikes Downtown The following list of strategies can be implemented in both downtowns to improve the biking environment and meet the needs of recreation and transportation: (Carl Sundstorm) Bicycle lanes in a downtown setting with parallel parking Bicycle Lanes Bicycle lanes serve an important function in the transportation and they help heighten the awareness of motorists to the presence of bicyclists on the roadway. Properly designed bicycle lanes encourage bicyclists to operate in a manner that is consistent with the legal operation of all vehicles. The AASHTO Guide to Bicycle Facilities recommends bicycle lanes established at a minimum of circumstances, bicycle lanes can be four feet wide. In cases where the bicycle lane is adjacent to parking, the bicycle lane should be striped to identify the separation from the parking and travel lanes. Bicycle Boulevards Bicycle boulevards are typically low-speed, low-volume roadways where the entire street width is designated as priority bikeways. These streets include both identifying and route signage and neighborhood greenways are effective because they provide a higher level of comfort for many users than roadways with bike lanes or shared lane markings, which often target more experienced riders. Buffered bicycle lanes provide added protection from cars where traffic moves faster / Adam Fukushima Example of a bicycle boulevard on a residential street. 24 Strategies OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

25 Shared Lane A shared lane or sharrow is a traditional street in which the shared lane symbol for bikes is placed within the vehicle travel lane. This strategy is generally used when there is not enough room in the roadway for a separate bicycle lane and when speed limits are set at or below 35 miles per hour. Shared markings can not justify a bicycle lane. The marking helps to encourage safe lane positioning and operation for bicyclists as well as to remind motorists about the presence of bicyclists, thus helping to reduce the number of crashes. (Lyubov Zuyeva) Shared lane marking or sharrows are a way to make drivers aware of the presence of cyclists when there may not be sufficient space for a dedicated bike lane Often, when there is a limited right-of-way, trade-offs must be made to maintain or add on-street parking, widen sidewalks, and accommodate vehicles. When speeds are low enough sharrows downtown areas while not taking up as much real estate on the street as traditional bike lanes. When used in combination with on-street parallel parking sharrows should be placed to show riders the correct positioning that is out of the way of potential obstacles such as car doors or drainage grates or about feet from the curb when parking is present. Source: la.streetsblog.org Strategies 25

26 of the downtown districts in the broader community as important. signage can also assist pedestrians and drivers. The Manual of describes signage protocols that can be incorporated into any signage that Mission or Overland Park may develop for the downtown districts. Important features of a and a mileage distance numeral. Bike route and directional signage. (NACTO.org) Bicycle Parking The availability of bicycle parking is important to encourage people to ride to downtown destinations. Without a secure place to lock a bicycle, the potential bicycle rider may choose to make his or her trip encourage and increase bicycle usage to downtown destinations. The Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals has published a best practices guide and recommendations about the types of racks to be installed. Many designs for bike racks exist and some communities may use bike racks as an opportunity to combine form and function as public art. Standard options include the inverted U design and the post and ring. An inverted U-rack, either secured to the racks in two places, supporting the frame. A single U-rack can park two bicycles. A post and ring rack may be useful in locations where space is tight. This rack allows two bicycles to be parked at a time and encourages proper use with its intuitive design. Post and Ring bike racks are good for tight spaces. Bike Racks: LEED ND standards recommend a minimum of one bicycle parking space per business. The standard U Racks or variations thereof are recommended for the ease of use and bike security, allowing for two contact points between the bike and the rack for ease of locking and stability. Standard U-Racks and adapted circular racks allow for bikes to be adequately secured while preventing damage. Bike parking plazas provide a dedicated space for multiple bikes where visitors can leave their bike and explore the area on foot. 26 Strategies OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

27 to slow cars in order to make streets safer and more compatible with walking and biking. The objective with addition to creating a better environment for walking and At slower speeds the severity of injury when accidents do happen between pedestrians and bikes is decreased substantially. Air quality and noise levels are improved due to slower vehicles which make less noise and emit fewer pollutants. Drivers have an improved chance of seeing unique or interesting local shops or attractions which can downtown areas include: Adding raised crosswalks creates a raised hump crosswalk visibility and making crossings easier on pedestrians with mobility challenges. Raised crosswalks can be combined with curb extensions to narrow the crossing distance further. Reducing lane widths and the amount of roadway dedicated to vehicle travel. Not only does this strategy encourage cars to go slower, this treatment also opens up more space for on-street parking, landscaping or pedestrian facilities. In general, 11 Changing the surface texture and using visual devices. Reduced building setbacks and building up to the lot line adds visual interest and reduces travel speeds. Speed table / raised crosswalk Curb Extensions AIS Severity (6 = Fatal) Pedestrian Safety Vehicle Impact Speed vs. Pedestrian Injury 20 mph Speed Limit on 80th Street (Overland Park) 30 mph Speed Limit Johnson Drive (Mission) Small Injuries Speed Usually Fatal Injuries Strategies 27

28 Intersection Improvements Intersections can be intimidating for both the bicycle and pedestrian modes. Crossing multiple wide lanes or using an unmarked crossing can feel unsafe for walkers and bicyclists who are sharing the space with vehicles. Making intersections more bicycle and pedestrian friendly is an important aspect of an inviting downtown. There are a number of improvements that can reduce risks at intersections, as well as make pedestrians and bicyclists more comfortable. These include providing for smaller curb radii to slow turning vehicles down, installing bulb-outs to reduce crossing distances and improving the visibility of crosswalks. Crosswalks Crosswalks identify the pedestrian right-of-way across a street and act as an extension of the sidewalk across an intersection. A marked crosswalk serves the dual purpose of informing drivers that pedestrians may be present and have a right to cross the roadway and assuring pedestrians that they are crossing at a designated and legal location. As pedestrian presence increases, and to mark the downtown core as a pedestrian space, special emphasis markings such as longitudinal ladder style crosswalks should be used to increase visibility and prioritize the pedestrian in place of traditional transverse lines, which are currently used at many locations. Colored and textured crosswalks can be utilized to enhance the aesthetic character of each downtown. While the installation of crosswalks may add installation and maintenance costs, they are important indicators of a pedestrian friendly environment and can be used as a placemaking tool as well as a safety enhancement. Thermoplastic treatment can enhance the longevity and decrease the maintenance costs of crosswalks over time. Crosswalk markings should be placed to avoid wheel paths and should be a minimum of six feet wide. Bulb-outs reduce the crossing distance for pedestrians and slow vehicles. In this picture they are combined with a surface material change which provides a visual cue to drivers that they are in a pedestrian area. High visibility crosswalks with ADA accessibility are important to making downtown a pedestrian friendly place. Curb Extensions or Bulb-outs Bulb-outs are extensions to the sidewalk installed at intersections or mid-block crossings to shorten the pedestrian crossing distance, thus limiting the amount of time the a quicker and safer street crossing. They slow as it passes through the area. High Visibility Striped Crosswalk Bulb-outs and Crossing Distance Crossing Distance without Bulb-outs Crossing Distance with Bulb-outs - typically reduces crossing distance by about 40 percent 28 Strategies OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

29 Pedestrian Friendly Signals at Intersections Signalized intersections can be designed to better accommodate pedestrians in a number of ways, including lengthening the WALK/ DON T WALK signal cycle time. For the visually impaired and elderly signal timing should be set to accommodate a walking speed of 2.5 feet per second. In addition, accessible pedestrian signals with audible or tactile provisions are being used in many communities. Countdown indicators for pedestrian signals are the standard at intersections where the pedestrian change interval is greater than seven seconds per the MUTCD. However, these signals may be used where the pedestrian change interval is less than seven seconds to inform pedestrians of the number of seconds remaining. The use of the countdown can help avoid symbols. The countdown signals should be prioritized in areas that that have concentrations of senior citizens or people with disabilities. Countdown display options for pedestrian signals. MUTCD Incorporating additional strategies, including tools like the Leading Pedestrian Indicator (LPI), is recommended. The LPI is a signal start into the intersection so that they have made it well into the intersection before motorists are allowed to turn right on their green signal. A NO TURN ON RED sign when pedestrians are present or a pedestrian activated blank out sign is recommended for any signalized intersections in Downtown Overland Park or Downtown Mission that have had a higher frequency of crashes. Bike Friendly Intersections A common frustration for bicyclists is their inability to activate a green signal because they are not detected at intersections. This frustration may cause a bicyclist to proceed through a red light, endangering the rider and potentially angering motorists who don t understand the impetus of the decision. There are several methods of detection available to mitigate this challenge, including video detection and loop detection. Overland Park is currently using video detection at many of the city s intersections. This method, or the installation of bicycle detection pavement markings (loop detectors), are both good ways to increase the friendliness of intersections. Both detectors allow a bicyclist to activate a green light without having to wait for a car to arrive behind them. mag ages. com Pedestrian priority signals at key intersections should be set to accommodate pedestrians of all ages and abilities. (Marie Stake) The Loop Detector with pavement signal marking shows bicyclists where to stop in order to activate the traffic signal. Strategies 29

30 project for Downtown Overland Park and Downtown Mission would provide valuable tools to and consistent brand within each downtown. Each city could develop an independent gateway and retain the overall branding and identity themes of each community. Extending the brand of the city to the built environment will help create a cohesive and consistent system that visitors and residents will recognize. Elements of this brand include District Gateways: Community Gateways come in many varied forms such as vehicular bridges, overpasses, portals, public art sculptures, traditional monument signs and pedestrian-scaled district markers. They the inherent character of the place. Gateways can extend the community branding and messaging They are most successful when integrated into the environment and landscape. Correct scale, placement and lighting are important for optimal impact, visibility and legibility. Example of gateway marking element on an underpass near Old Town Arvada, Colorado. The district gateways should alert travelers that they are approaching a unique area within the larger city. This can be achieved through gateway markings, district signage, and aesthetic enhancements. An example of an ideal gateway piece for Downtown Mission might be an overhead sign where Johnson Drive crosses under Metcalf to alert drivers that they are approaching a unique district within the city. Some ideas the cities might consider include: At exits off of Interstate 35, add standardized Department of Transportation Supplemental Guide Signs or Cultural District Signs allowed by the 2009 MUTCD (Manual on District Markers or Welcome Signs can have the look and feel of the city s brand and be posted on either two posts or a single-post that requires less area and can be more cost effective. less expensive than lighting. District Identity Elements 30 Strategies OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

31 Consider engaging local artists to be an integral part of the Gateway design as part of a Call for Entries. Collaborate with the Kansas Department of Transportation for review and approval of all sign designs proposed on State Highways or in areas under their jurisdiction. to an entire city, provide a system that helps guide visitors and residents to key destinations, including parks, government centers and other attractions. people orient themselves in unfamiliar or new to place. Programs generally consist of signs, symbols, colors, messages and images. People environment by a process known as cognitive mapping creating a mental image of a place should be intuitive, easy to grasp quickly and able to cross cultural and language barriers. The enables visitors to easily determine their own experiences by empowering them to make their way through the area with comfort and clarity and provide a combination of manufactured, electronic and human elements to create a guided experience for visitors as well as residents. Statistics show that people make their opinions of places in as little as Examples of Public Parking Wayfinding and Identification Examples of District Identity Signage community s identity. The visual representation of that identity is the thread of continuity from gateways to corridors to commercial centers to neighborhoods. A successfully designed sign program is not only functional and memorable; it also extends a welcoming gesture to visitors and they care for everyone s comfort and experience. businesses unless a part of the program includes a business focused directory or smart phone application. They don t add clutter to the streets they reduce clutter and consolidate information. The signs are not just for the visitor; instead, they identify areas of interest to locals and visitors alike. Street Signs & Pageantry Elements Strategies 31

32 Create a consistent and controlled design vision downtown. Provide a stronger sense of arrival into the downtown districts. Facilitate circulation and educate visitors about the destinations, amenities and commercial offerings within downtown areas. Create a system that can be extendible to other areas of the city with a different color and materials palette. The signs should be distinctive, and at the same time harmonious with the context and existing signs. Signs will be made of high quality, durable and practical materials. Specify a decorative post and base similar to existing Maximum of four (4) messages per sign Letter height: 4, upper and lower case Messages should be brief Abbreviation of messages is acceptable (example: Street=St) Do not include individual business names or logos Gateways: From large scale elements that span roadways to more pedestrian scaled district markers, the most successful gateway markings effectively announce arrival and opportunity to promote community assets and promote a sense of civic pride and downtown character. Developments in technology have transformed the mainstream process excellent means of enhancing the physical environment and informing the public about the unique characteristics and destinations located within cities and their users to interface simultaneously with the digital and physical worlds through the websites and Google Earth. Local venues, businesses and events can all advertise on the map site, creating a platform to generate buzz about the place. Links to the maps can be placed in advertisements, press-releases or as QR codes integrated into the site signs or features. Utilizing the integrated digital maps enhances ease of use, project awareness, and educational opportunities while providing the potential revenue growth. Avoid identifying schools Use MUTCD approved typeface (note: A historic typeface may be considered, but must be approved by the regional KDOT representative) Use MUTCD approved arrow design Use colors from the downtown brands Back face of sign can be the brand tagline Historic District Next Right Highway Cultural or Historic District Signage can be placed at exit ramps from main thoroughfares. 32 Strategies OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

33 Bike and Pedestrian Signage Bike Guide Signage: (MUTCD), the traditional green and white bicycle route guide signs should be provided at decision points along the designated bicycle routes and repeated at regular intervals so that bicyclists entering from side streets have the opportunity to know they are on a bicycle route. Route signs should be used on all shared lanes. Bicycle warning signs alerting vehicle drivers to share the road should also be used. Unlike vehicular and bicycle signage, which is regulated by the MUTCD, there is no national or state standard pedestrian-scaled elements that include directional information and maps. Without regulation, pedestrian signs can further extend the branding with more elaborate images, patterns and varieties of color. While there should always be a common thread of continuity in the overall sign program design for cohesiveness, most successful when each system is distinctive from the other. This can be achieved through scale, color, form and materials. Each audience should not be confused by all signage appearing too similar or homogenous. When the set up the same visual cue for all the signs in the program. You see one sign and you have essentially seen them all. Left: Pedestrian Signage, can feature more detailed information and maps. Above: Bike Signage can provide route signage and distances and is often paired with signage for motor vehicles. Strategies 33

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35 EXISTING CONDITIONS Downtown Overland Park and Mission 4 Existing Conditions 35

36 Existing Conditions: In order to understand what the existing walking and bicycling conditions are in Downtown Overland Park and Downtown Mission the team spent time in both cities measurements to complete a pedestrian and bicycle inventory. Using this information, the team completed a Level of Service (LOS) analysis of the existing conditions for bicycling and walking. The LOS analysis involves a mathematical equation used to evaluate the bicycling and walking conditions factors used by transportation engineers and planners for other travel modes. The LOS and walking on a scale of A - F and helps to pinpoint areas for ongoing improvements, as well as identify opportunities for the addition of bicycle or pedestrian features. The Bicycle and Pedestrian LOS metrics are exactly the ones established in the 2010 Highway Capacity Manual. They are satisfaction-based metrics developed in tandem with virtually all the other transportation system performance metrics in the new HCM. As such, they were developed with nationwide calibration. They utilize geometric and operational variables. These performance measures articulate how well bicycle or pedestrian facilities (or lack operational settings. The factors that affect level of service and the quality of the walking and biking environment include: Percent Heavy Vehicles (e.g. Trucks) Posted Speed Limit Width of Pavement Pavement Condition: smoothness or roughness. Presence of on-street parking and the percent occupied Presence of a bicycle lane Presence of a sidewalk What do Level of Service Ratings Mean? The Bicycle and Pedestrian LOS models of the Highway Capacity Manual have been in use across the U.S. for decades. They are objective and accurate performance measures alongside a street or roadway, particularly in terms of their and roadway conditions. These performance metrics use many other travel modes LOS such as for motor vehicle movement and transit. With statistical precision, the Bicycle LOS Model pavement surface conditions, the speed and type of adjacent motor vehicles, and the effects of on-street parking. For the Pedestrian s LOS the presence and width of a sidewalk and any calibrated mathematical equations are commonly reported, levels of performance, A, B, C, D, E and F, similar to grades in school. Thus, roadways that have relatively wide cross- levels of speeds, and where few provisions for bicyclists and pedestrians are present, generally fall within the E or F designations. Streets and roadways within a particular emphasis zone should provide a minimum level of service to be consistent around a downtown, wherein pedestrian accommodation, a LOS of B for the streets and roadways in the zone. This selection of a performance level does not necessarily dictate a amongst the roadways and streets within the zone. Rather, as streets and roadways are altered or planned for changes, the designers can use the LOS performance measure equations, the same as what was used in the Existing Conditions evaluations, to test out different alternatives (i.e., facility types, geometries). This allows designers and planners to make of service based upon the unique setting, constraints, and opportunities. Different facility types can achieve different sidewalk placed right behind the curb on a quiet street may provide a good level of service, such as LOS A or B, but placed width of the outside travel lane. For more information about the Bicycle or Pedestrian Level of Service Models, including the model form and the collected data items, please see the Appendix. 36 Existing Conditions OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

37 Width of buffer between the street and the sidewalk Presence and distance between street trees Overland Park: Pedestrian LOS The roadways in Downtown Overland Park have pedestrian LOS ratings ranging from B to D with a small section along Metcalf that is rated as LOS E. Portions of Santa Fe, 79th and 80th Street are already at a pedestrian LOS rating of B which means that in these areas many pedestrian safety and comfort features attract pedestrian trips. However, there are fewer amenities or pedestrian design elements than might be found on a street rated LOS A, which can attract even more pedestrian trips. Due to constrained right-of-way on some streets and fewer amenities, even the pedestrian oriented streets like Santa Fe fall short of an LOS A ranking. The majority of the other downtown streets fall under the LOS C are adequate for pedestrian use, but may not attract pedestrian trips. Over time, all of the streets in the downtown core should strive to achieve LOS of A or B, with street features and land uses that welcome and attract pedestrian use. Metcalf Avenue and pedestrian safety and comfort are more likely and ADA requirements for width and clearance are often not met. In the near term it is unlikely that Metcalf Avenue will become a pedestrian focused zone, however, ensuring pedestrian safety along and across this major roadway is critical to improving access to downtown. Figure 4: Pedestrian LOS - Downtown Overland Park Santa Fe Dr Conser Foster Valley View Dr Hamilton Dr Pedestrian LOS A Pedestrian LOS B Pedestrian LOS C Pedestrian LOS D Pedestrian LOS E Pedestrian LOS F Marty Overland Park Dr Floyd Metcalf 78th St 79th St 80th St 81st St 82nd St 83rd St Existing Conditions 37

38 Bike LOS The biking conditions in the downtown area rate slightly lower than those for people walking around the area. Every street in Downtown Overland Park ranks below a Bicycle LOS B rating except for a small segment of Hamilton Street, near the Matt Ross Community Center. The majority of the streets in the downtown area have Bicycle LOS ratings of C or D because, while vehicle speeds and volumes are relatively low and therefore conducive to not exist. Whereas Santa Fe and Overland Park Drive have constrained right-of-ways modes, many other streets downtown can accommodate some level of bicycle facility to improve their Bicycle LOS. Figure 5: Bike LOS - Downtown Overland Park Conser Foster Marty Floyd Metcalf 78th St 79th St 80th St Santa Fe Dr Valley View Dr Bike LOS A Hamilton Dr Overland Park Dr 81st St 82nd St Bike LOS B Bike LOS C Bike LOS D 83rd St Bike LOS E Bike LOS F 38 Existing Conditions OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

39 Figure 6: Pedestrian Level of Service - Downtown Mission Metcalf Ave Broadmoor St Barkley St Riggs Ave Lamar Ave Beverly Ave Dearborn Ave Woodson Rd Outlook Rd Reeds Rd Maple St Nall Ave East Gateway Roeland Dr West Gateway Johnson Dr Martway St 61st St Shawnee Mission Parkway Mission: 62nd St Pedestrian LOS A Pedestrian LOS B Pedestrian LOS C Pedestrian LOS D Pedestrian LOS E Pedestrian LOS F Pedestrian LOS: In Mission, the roadways that received the highest pedestrian level of service rating were the residential streets along Reeds Road, Maple Street and Nall Avenue which were rated LOS B. None of the commercial streets received an LOS rating higher than C. Streets with a rating of LOS C are adequate for pedestrian use, but do not necessarily attract pedestrian trips, which is an important element in creating a vibrant downtown environment. The improvements to Johnson Drive should improve the pedestrian LOS along Mission s primary retail street. Existing Conditions 39

40 Figure 7: Bike Level of Service - Downtown Mission Metcalf Ave Broadmoor St Barkley St Riggs Ave Lamar Ave Beverly Ave Dearborn Ave Woodson Rd Outlook Rd Reeds Rd Maple St Nall Ave East Gateway Roeland Dr West Gateway Johnson Dr Martway St 61st St Shawnee Mission Parkway 62nd St Bike LOS A Bike LOS B Bike LOS C Bike LOS D Bike LOS E Bike LOS F Bike LOS: street network does not adequately address the needs of bicyclists. The main roadway, Johnson Drive, is rated LOS E, which is inadequate for bikers of moderate ability and requires caution from advanced riders. Martway and a number of the north-south streets that connect to downtown are rated LOS C, as they are adequate for most bicyclists, however, they could easily be improved with the addition of an on-street bicycle facility. The more residential streets, including 61st Street, Outlook Road, Reeds Road, and Maple Street, have the highest rankings in Mission with LOS B. These streets are adequate for all bicyclists even in the absence of an on or off-street bicycle facility due to low levels of interaction with vehicles and good surface conditions. 40 Existing Conditions OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

41 Biking and Walking in Downtown Overland Park: What s Downtown now? Overall, Downtown Overland Park is a walkable downtown with relatively low vehicle speeds and volumes and a grid system that routes to access their destinations. Walking Facilities: Strengths: Downtown Overland Park has a very strong existing street grid network and many blocks have complete sidewalks. The downtown is generally made up of regular, well connected blocks that make it easy for pedestrians to access the entire downtown area in a short period of time and with little effort. 79th by Santa Fe Drive ADA-compliant ramps exist at most downtown intersections. Santa Fe, between 79th and 80th, is a community destination that can serve as the model for additional improvements. Mid-block crossings and high-emphasis crosswalks are Opportunities for Improvement: walkable community. width or less, which are suitable in residential settings. However successful downtown district, where people are likely to walk in groups and spend more time congregating. The public plaza in Downtown Overland Park is an attractive community destination that connects the Santa Fe shopping area to the farmers market A number of streets in the downtown area, particularly along north-south streets such as Marty and Floyd, lack street trees. In many situations, parking lots extend across the sidewalk zone, which degrades the quality of the walking environment and pedestrian safety. The surrounding land uses include large building set backs and expansive parking lots that do not encourage walkability. Marked crosswalks exist at only a handful of locations, primarily along Santa Fe Drive and 80th Street. spread throughout downtown. Making it safe and easy for people to access these and future destinations is an important goal that redevelops. The public noted the lack of streetscape amenities. Recent redevelopment efforts like the Phoenix Building help to activate the downtown area providing active retail on the ground floor and offices on the second level. Existing Conditions 41

42 Bicycling Facilities: Strengths: and volumes and are already comfortable for intermediate or experienced cyclists. Opportunities for Improvement: There are currently no marked bicycle facilities in Downtown Overland Park, which contributes to the relatively low bicycle aide in alerting drivers to the presence of cyclists and guiding cyclists to the best routes. Intersections and Crossings: Downtown Overland Park s pedestrians and bicyclists experience a variety of crossing types including signalized crosswalks, unsignalized crosswalks, unmarked crosswalks and mid-block crossings. Mid-block crossings exist along Santa Fe Drive, 80th Street, Overland Park Drive and Marty Street. Strengths: Mid-block crossings and high-emphasis crosswalks are currently Opportunities for Improvement: its eastern edge along Metcalf Avenue, at 79th Street and 80th Street, and one at Santa Fe Drive and 80th Street which should be improved to enhance access to the downtown from residential neighborhoods. There may be additional locations where marked crosswalks 80th Street in Downtown Overland Park at the intersections with Marty St. and Floyd St. as particularly challenging. While the existing mid-block crossings on 80th Street may preclude the introduction of more marked crossings given the short distances between the potential crossing locations, a pedestrian access study of the corridor is recommended, particularly as it is redeveloped, to identify the most effective locations for marked crossings. Bus stop on Marty Street serving The JO, constructed in the spring of (Photo: Doug Johnson) The farmers market draws many people from surrounding neighborhoods who walk or bike. Existing bike rack in downtown Overland Park Google Earth Street View Street Furniture and paving details provide important pedestrian amenities in Downtown Overland Park that should be utilized throughout the downtown. 42 Existing Conditions OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

43 Figure 8: Existing Pedestrian Infrastructure in Downtown Overland Park: FOSTER MARTY FLOYD METCALF Farmers Market SANTA FE DR Community Center HAMILTON OVERLAND PARK DR Existing Sidewalks Existing Sidewalks Missing Sidewalks Missing Sidewalks Existing Crosswalks Driveway Crossing Existing Crosswalks Driveway Crossing Existing Conditions 43

44 Biking and Walking in Mission: What s Downtown now? Mission s downtown core is centered along Johnson Drive, a roadway which previously functioned as a state highway and therefore created an auto-centric rather than a bicycle or pedestrian oriented corridor and downtown. The orientation of Johnson Drive in the district. Walking Facilities Strengths: Many of the streets in the vicinity of Downtown Mission include sidewalks. Pedestrian Crossing at Johnson Drive The Rock Creek Trail provides an enhanced, designated walking and biking path through the center of Downtown Mission. Opportunities for Improvement: Filling in the sidewalk grid along the north-south street between Martway and Johnson Drive and then focusing on the impact in making Downtown Mission more pedestrian friendly and accessible. Where sidewalks are provided on only one side of the street or missing completely in the downtown area, the connectivity of the sidewalk is weakened as is pedestrian safety and accessibility, requiring unnecessary crossing for pedestrians to access their destination on foot. Sidewalk Along Martway Wide parking lots that extend from building fronts to the street downtown streets, thereby creating a less than ideal walking environment and inconsistent conditions. Inconsistencies in sidewalk and parking strategies on the streets running north and south of Johnson Drive create a haphazard environment and unsafe conditions for pedestrians and cyclists who are continuously having to adjust to different situations or uncomfortable conditions. Crosswalk in need of upkeep in Mission The City is currently in the process of renovating Johnson Drive and portions of Martway in the downtown district with improvements including upgrades and enhancements to sidewalks, crosswalks, and other streetscape amenities designed to facilitate walking. Because plans for Johnson Drive and Martway are already complete and construction underway, this report does not address these streets in detail. Many of the intersections in Downtown Mission between the lower speed and lower volume streets (such as 61st Street) and higher volume streets (such as Lamar) present challenges to or designated crosswalks. Pedestrian amenities in Mission 44 Existing Conditions OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

45 Bicycling Facilities: Strengths: While Downtown Mission does not currently have any formal on-street bicycling infrastructure, planned improvements to Martway Street include the installation of bicycle lanes between Broadmoor Street and Lamar Avenue. Mission has an off-street shared-use path, the Rock Creek Trail, running east-west through the downtown district. This path connects Metcalf to the new transit center on Johnson Drive just west of Roeland Drive. Opportunities for Improvement: Opportunities exist to improve on-street bike facilities and amenities such as bike racks to supplement and connect to the Rock Creek Trail and access downtown businesses. Facilities such as shared lane markings should be incorporated on northsouth streets. In addition, connections to the planned facilities on Martway should be completed. Existing bike racks in Mission are not recommended for ease of use and security provided for by other models The more substantial transit station in Mission should include both long and short term parking to facilitate commuters and bicycle riders who may need to park their bicycles for longer periods of time. Intersections and Crossings: Mid-block crossings and high-emphasis crosswalks are Downtown Mission Examples of existing pedestrian scale lighting and street trees Existing Conditions 45

46 Figure 9: Existing Pedestrian Infrastructure in Downtown Mission: LAMAR Community Centerer JOHNSON DRIVE HORTON MARTWAY BEVERLY DEARBORN City Hall WOODSON OUTLOOK REEDS MAPLE NALL Existing Sidewalks Missing Sidewalks Rock Creek Trail Existing Crosswalks Driveway Crossing 46 Existing Conditions OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

47 5 RECOMMENDATIONS Inviting Pedestrians and Bikes Downtown Recommendations 47

48 Recommendations: The existing conditions inventory and analysis and initial feedback from the public on preferred routes, common destinations, and problem spots or barriers informed the following set of recommendations for each city. The recommendations are based on current best practices for enhancing the downtown environments of each community, not only for better pedestrian and bicycle access, but also to activate the downtowns to enhance and attract business. The tables below correspond to Figures 10, 11, 13 and 14, which demonstrate locations of some of the key pedestrian and bicycle facility improvements. While there are some recommendations that can be relatively easily implemented with a bit of paint, others will take time to realize and may depend on private sector investment. WALKABLE AND ACTIVATED DOWNTOWN Tool Estimated Cost Priority Priority Locations / Projects in OVERLAND PARK Priority Locations / Projects in MISSION Install Pedestrian Amenities (Benches, Trash Cans, lighting, etc.) Pedestrian enhancements when designed appropriately can help to generate an interesting and active downtown environment where people are comfortable walking from one place to the next both during the day and at night. Varies High Priority Pedestrian Zones along 80th, Marty and Santa Fe Drive. (See Figure 10) Add benches (Minimum of 1 per block with more along high volume pedestrian areas such as Santa Fe), trash cans (1 per block), and lighting. As redevelopment takes place more pedestrian amenities should be installed throughout the downtown core as a way to serve pedestrian needs as well as identify the downtown as a unique district within the city. Complete Sidewalk Network Allows residents and visitors to walk safely and comfortably around downtown and encourages pedestrian movement. Medium Low Improvements will depend on private development or the undertaking of a streetscape plan. If the city is to undertake a project, focus should be placed along Marty Street and the connections from the Community Center and the transit stop. The Form Based Code articulates different sidewalk widths dependent on street type with the minimum being 5 feet. Connectivity to the downtown can be improved along Santa Fe on the block between 79th Street and 78th Street where there is currently no pedestrian or vehicle access. The Form Based Code recommends breaking up the block to provide a public connection when the property is redeveloped, which will have a positive impact on connectivity for pedestrians and bikes. installation is on Beverly, between Johnson Drive and Martway, where the sidewalk network is either missing or incomplete, especially where this occurs on both sides of the roadway. The focus should then be directed towards completing the sidewalk network on additional north-south street sections between Johnson Drive and Martway where current commercial activity is focused. The connections to the neighborhoods north and south of the downtown core, to facilitate and encourage walking, should also be a focus. Sidewalks should be a minimum width of 5 feet on the local streets and include a 2 to 4 foot buffer where possible on streets leading to the downtown core and a minimum of 10 feet where commercial activity is existing or expected. 48 Recommendations OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

49 WALKABLE AND ACTIVATED DOWNTOWN (CONTINUED) Tool Street Trees Enhances the feeling of safety and comfort for pedestrians and improves the overall aesthetic appearance of the street. Provides environmental stormwater management. Purchasing large caliper street trees should be prioritized throughout the study areas. As redevelopment occurs the provision of street trees should be incorporated into the development approvals process. Estimated Cost Priority Medium Priority Locations / Projects in OVERLAND PARK Figure 10 which includes Santa Fe Drive, 80th Street and Marty Street. Marty Street, offering connections to the Community Center and the Transit Stop, should be the secondary corridor after 80th and Santa Fe. Priority Locations / Projects in MISSION provide street trees in the Priority 13, which includes Johnson Drive from Lamar to Roeland and Beverly within the downtown core study area. Limited Curb Cuts Improves safety by minimizing opportunities and pedestrians. Medium Locations are dependent on redevelopment and the redesign of building sites and vehicle access. Shared parking lots and limited curb cuts should be encouraged. Permanent Extended Intersection or Mid-block Bulbouts Activates the street and encourages more pedestrian activity. Medium These are appropriate along the Pedestrian Priority Zones in both downtowns. Parklets for Seasonal Outdoor Dining Activates the street and encourages more pedestrian activity. Administrative Costs Medium Parklets would be appropriate in areas with constrained right-ofway such as Santa Fe Drive or along 80th Street. The primary focus should be along Johnson Drive in the near term. As redevelopment takes place over time additional opportunities may arise to take advantage of this recommendation. Buffered Sidewalks Enhances perceived safety and comfort of pedestrians as well as improves the overall aesthetic appearance of local streets. Planting areas can also provide low impact stormwater management as rain gardens. Low Dependent on development or undertaking of streetscape plan. If the City is to undertake projects, the focus should be on Marty Street to connect to the Community Center and the Transit Stop. The Form Based are appropriate for buffered sidewalks. The north-south neighborhood streets leading to the downtown. Recommendations 49

50 INVITING BIKES DOWNTOWN Tool Estimated Cost Priority Priority Locations / Projects in OVERLAND PARK Priority Locations / Projects in MISSION Shared Lane Markings (Sharrows) Pavement markings identify the best lane position for the bicyclist and signal to motorists that bicyclists should be expected. They improve bicyclist comfort on the roadway. Shared lane markings are appropriate on the selected roadways roadway width to provide a dedicated lane and where vehicle speeds are slow enough to allow for a shared system. $200 each marking (3 per block) High Priority streets include 79th and 80th Streets between Metcalf, Conser, and Marty. The routes should be continued with signage outside of the downtown core, with shared lane markings from Santa Fe to Broadmoor. The routes illustrated in Figure 11 provide bicycle access to the community destinations that were meetings. Shared lane markings on Martway Street to supplement the planned bike lane and provide access to the community center. North-south connections to and through the downtown should include shared lane markings and signage along Lamar and Nall and then on Broadmoor/Barkley and Woodson (See Figure 14). Bicycle Parking Allows long or short term parking of bicycle; available bicycle parking is an important component to make bicycle transportation a viable mode. $ per inverted U-rack plus installation High Three racks per block to hold 6 bikes total along 80th Street, Marty Street, Santa Fe Drive. Additional racks for 4 to 10 bikes should be installed at community destinations including near the Farmers Market, Community Center, Rio Theater, Santa Fe Shopping Area, Homer s Cafe, the new Transit Stop on Marty and Santa Fe Commons. Racks should be added as demand increases. The City should aim to install a minimum of three racks per block along Johnson Drive with additional racks at the new transit center and the transit stop on Lamar. Covered bike parking and/or bike lockers should be considered at the existing and planned transit stops. Bicycle Lane Bike lanes are the preferred bicycle accommodation where there is adequate space in the right of way. Medium Marty (from 79th to Metcalf) is the only street in Overland Park that has adequate right-of-way to accommodate a dedicated bike lane. in the near term, however as bike lanes are preferred, this route should consider on-street bike lanes as volumes increase. No bicycle lanes aside from the existing facility on Martway are recommended for Mission due to constrained right-of-ways on many of the primary streets and because vehicle speeds and volumes are low enough to support shared lanes as an alternative to full bicycle lanes. 50 Recommendations OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

51 INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS Tool Estimated Cost Priority Priority Locations / Projects in OVERLAND PARK Priority Locations / Projects in MISSION Install Enhanced Crosswalks at Key Intersections International, ladder style crosswalk increases pedestrians perception of safety and are more visible from vehicles. Thermoplastic treatment can ensure longevity and reduced maintenance. $5,000- $7,000 per intersection High Study 80th and Marty / 80th and Floyd for their effectiveness in meeting pedestrian and cyclist needs. Initial public feedback as barriers to pedestrian travel. The crosswalks should be realigned at 79th and Metcalf and 80th and Metcalf when the curbs are reconstructed. Santa Fe and 79th Street also serves as a gateway intersection to the retail core and should be enhanced to mark this transition and emphasize pedestrian priority. The intersection of Beverly and Martway should be evaluated for its effectiveness in meeting pedestrian needs in order to facilitate improved access to the community center. Intersections along Johnson Drive are being improved in the current plan. Lamar and Martway can also be enhanced for improved pedestrian connections and access to the Rock Creek Trail. Johnson Drive and Metcalf is an important intersection to improve for better access to the downtown. Curb Extensions or Bulb-outs Shortens pedestrian crossing distances. Medium Locations are dependent on private development or may streetscape plan led by the City. If the City is to undertake a project, an initial focus should be on Marty Street to connect the Community Center to the transit stop. Bulb-outs are incorporated into the design of already-approved Johnson Drive enhancements. Pedestrian Friendly Signals Safer pedestrian environment; better accommodation for pedestrians $25,000 per intersection Medium The City should ensure that the signals at the intersections along Metcalf have a signal timing pedestrians to cross based on a walking speed of 2.5 feet per second. The City should provide pedestrian countdown signals at 79th and Metcalf. The intersections of Johnson Drive and Metcalf and Johnson Drive and Lamar should be timed for pedestrian crossing speeds of 2.5 feet per second. Additional study of pedestrian access along Shawnee Mission Parkway at key locations is recommended as barrier for neighborhoods south of Shawnee Mission Parkway. Bike Friendly Intersections Video or loop detection at intersections to allow bicyclists to activate a signal change Medium Priority intersections include 79th and Metcalf and 80th and barriers at the Public Workshop. is adequately recognizing the presence of a cyclist or if adjustments are necessary. Signals along Lamar and Nall should have bicyclist activated signals to facilitate bike connections between the two communities. Recommendations 51

52 ADDITIONAL TOOLS: Tool Estimated Cost Priority Priority Locations / Projects in OVERLAND PARK Priority Locations / Projects in MISSION Route Signage Increased pedestrian and bicyclist accommodation travel and can communicate distances and destinations within the community. $250 per sign High Write and issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) for a Comprehensive Documentation and Implementation Plan and determine funding strategies to budget the implementation of the program over time. Utilize and follow the approved 2009 MUTCD guidelines for the jurisdiction of KDOT Destinations: Community Center, Santa Fe Drive, Transit Stop, Farmer s Market, and the movie theater. Route signage should be placed at decision points along each route to direct users to the Rock Creek Trail, Johnson Drive, and the Community Center. Route signage should be placed at decision in Figure 14. Bicycle Boulevard Network Used on low volume, to designate preferred routes between the two downtowns and longer range destinations. Signage and shared lane markings identify the route for bikers and direct riders to key destinations along the route. Medium Lamar and Nall can serve as the north-south connections between Downtown Overland Park and Downtown Mission. Additionally, Santa Fe Drive has the potential to serve as a cross-town bike route, connecting neighborhoods around Downtown Overland Park to neighborhoods to the north, including north of Shawnee Mission Parkway and west of Metcalf. Bicyclists connecting from Downtown OP to Downtown Mission could use Santa Fe as a north-south route heading north, and then connect east along Johnson Drive toward Downtown Mission. An additional east-west connection that should be considered for a Bicycle Boulevard is along 71st Street which could connect Antioch Road to Nall Avenue. This east-west connection could further facilitate connections from other parts of northeast Johnson County to the Santa Fe Drive and Lamar Avenue bike corridors (running north-south). Gateway / District Signage Helps signify arrival to travelers and visitors and reinforces each city s image and brand. Medium Metcalf, at 79th and 83rd, provide ideal locations for the beginning of district identity signage signifying the downtown area. The city can work with KDOT to place highway directional signage identifying routes to Downtown Overland Park, along I-435 and I-35. A driver passing toward Downtown Mission, and passing under the Metcalf Avenue interchange at Johnson Drive, should feel that they are approaching a unique area within the larger city. An overhead gateway sign on this bridge may help to serve as a downtown monumentation element, to make drivers aware of their arrival into the Downtown Mission Area. Similarly, this kind of district identity signage can be used throughout Downtown Mission and along other major routes such as Roe and Shawnee Mission Parkway, to highlight the location and directions to Downtown Mission. 52 Recommendations OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

53 Pedestrian Facilities Figure 10 shows some of the areas to focus pedestrian improvements. The diagram shows where extended parking barriers to pedestrian travel and degrade the experience of walking downtown. The City should explore consolidating entrances where possible and making smaller driveways where the sidewalk is given priority. The City of Overland Park should also work to complete the sidewalk network on both sides of the streets leading to the areas where the sidewalk is missing from both sides of the roadway as is the case along 81st Street and the southern end of Marty as it approaches Metcalf. Figure 10: Opportunities for Pedestrian Improvements: Downtown Overland Park FOSTER MARTWAY Farmers Market MARTY FLOYD METCALF The priority pedestrian zones should be the main focus of pedestrian related improvements and investment in the near to mid term. The priority pedestrian zones include: Pedestrian Zone Extends to Conser SANTA FE DR Santa Fe Drive from the round about at Conser north to 79th Street, Pedestrian Zone Extends to Round About Community Center HAMILTON 80th Street from Conser to Metcalf, and Marty from Conser to Hamilton. Intersections that should be evaluated further and improved to better serve pedestrians include: OVERLAND PARK DR The two intersections along Metcalf, at 79th and 80th, both of which are critical crossings for people walking to downtown from the neighborhoods to the east. Santa Fe Drive and 79th, as the gateway to the primary retail area of downtown, is an important intersection to prioritize pedestrians. Key Intersection for Improved Pedestrian Crossing Existing Crosswalks Fill In Sidewalk Network Extended Parking L Priority Pedestrian Zone - Streetscape and Pedestrian Comfort Improvements Existing Crosswalks Extended Parking Lot Improvement Intersections along 80th Street at Marty and Floyd are key intersections for people accessing downtown and are important in facilitating better connections to the Matt Ross Community Center. Recommendations 53

54 Bike Facilities In Overland Park, improving bike connections downtown and to key destinations can be achieved through a combination of shared lane markings and marked or signed bike routes. The City has plans to undertake a city wide bike plan called the Safe Bike Use Outreach Project in 2013 which will address bike facilities in greater detail. Preliminary recommendations for the downtown area are included in this document, however ultimately guidance should come from the city wide plan. Recommended north-south connections: Figure 11: Conser Foster Farmers Market Marty JO Transit Stop Floyd Metcalf Mazda 78th St 79th St Shared lane marking / bike route along Marty Street ending at Metcalf Avenue and connecting along 78th to Santa Fe where the route continues to the north. 80th St Marked bike route along Santa Fe with a detour west to Foster between 78th and 79th Streets. Recommended east-west connections: 79th Street may consist of a combination of a marked route outside of the downtown core and shared lane markings from Santa Fe to Broadmoor. Santa Fe Drive Head Start of Shawnee Mission Santa Fe Commons Park Valley View Dr Matt Ross Community Center 81st St 82nd St 80th Street may consist of a combination of a marked route outside of the downtown core and shared lane markings from Santa Fe to Broadmoor. To South Lake Park 83rd St Community Destination Proposed Bike Lane* Proposed Shared Lane Marking* Proposed Marked Bike Routes *Bike Lanes and Shared Lanes would also have bike route signage 54 Recommendations OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

55 EXISTING STREETSCAPE Figure 12: Illustrative of potential pedestrian and bike enhancements on 80th Street POTENTIAL STREETSCAPE Extended planting areas Pedestrian Scale Lighting Outdoor Wide Dining Sidewalks Opportunities High Visibility Crosswalks Shared Lane Markings Street Trees Recommendations 55

56 Figure 13: Opportunities for Pedestrian Improvements: Downtown Mission LAMAR HORTON BEVERLY DEARBORN WOODSON OUTLOOK REEDS MAPLE NALL JOHNSON DRIVE Community Center MARTWAY MARTWAY CITY HALL Key Intersection for Imrproved Pedestrian Crossing Fill In Sidewalk Network Priority Pedestrian Zone - Streetscape and Pedestrian Comfort Improvements Pedestrian Facilities Existing Crosswalks Figure 13 shows some of the areas to focus pedestrian improvements in Downtown Mission. The diagram shows where extended parking lots or access points degrade the experience of walking downtown. The City should consider restricting the width of driveways and ensure the sidewalk is given priority as development takes place. The City of Mission should also work to complete the sidewalk network on both sides of the priority being areas where the sidewalk is missing from both sides of the roadway as is the case along Horton, Beverly, Dearborn, and Outlook Streets. The priority pedestrian zones should be the main focus of pedestrian related improvements and investment in the near to mid-term. The priority pedestrian zones include: Johnson Drive from Lamar Avenue to Roeland Drive and Driveway or Parking Lot Crossing Beverly between the end of the residential area north of Johnson Drive to Martway. Intersections that should be evaluated further and improved to better serve pedestrians include: Lamar and Johnson Drive, as the gateway to the downtown retail core and pedestrian zone, should be priorities. Beverly and Johnson Drive and Beverly and Martway provide important connection points to the Sylvester Powell Community Center. Woodson and Johnson Drive should be prioritized as it serves as a primary connection to City Hall. 56 Recommendations OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

57 Figure 14: Metcalf Ave Broadmoor 58th Street Lamar Woodson Nall Broadmoor Park East Gateway Roeland Dr Johnson Dr West Gateway Transit Station Martway 61st Street Panera Target High School Future ure Transit Johnson on Station County Northeast Offices HyVee e Community Center Transit Station Anderson Park Barkley 62nd Street Shawnee Mission Parkway Bike Facilities In Mission, improving bike connections downtown and to key destinations can be achieved through a combination of the existing Rock Creek Trail, shared lane markings and marked or signed bike routes. There are no streets in Mission aside from Martway that would be appropriate for a dedicated bike lane due to constrained right-of-ways. The recommended routes and Community Destination Proposed Bike Lane* Proposed Shared Lane Marking* Proposed Marked Bike Routes Rock Creek Trail Existing Bike Lane *Bike Lanes and Shared Lanes would also have bike route signage Recommendations 57

58 EXISTING STREETSCAPE Figure 15: Illustrative of potential pedestrian and bike enhancements on Lamar Avenue south of Johnson Drive. POTENTIAL STREETSCAPE Extended planting areas Outdoor Dining Opportunities Biker Activated Stop Lights Improved Route Signage Street Trees Sidewalk Priority at Driveways 58 Recommendations OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

59 District and Directional Signage Recommendations: Figure 16 illustrates some preliminary locations for enhanced district and directional signage in the two downtowns, however, there are opportunities Figure 16: District and Directional Signage Recommendations: I-35 & Lamar JOHNSON DRIVE Downtown Mission SHAWNEE MISSION PARKWAY ANTIOCH RD Antioch Park SANTA FE DR METCALF AVE LAMAR AVE Mohawk Park NALL AVE ROE AVE Milburn Country Club 71ST ST 75TH ST Antioch Acres Park Marty Park Porter Park Youngs Park 79TH ST Downtown Overland Park Santa Fe & Antioch SANTA FE DR LOWELL ST 87th & Metcalf 83RD ST District Signage Directional Signage Main Bikeway Connection Recommendations 59

60

61 6 IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES Implementation Strategies 61

62 Implementation The cities should prioritize improvements that establish a proper framework for thriving streets and safety for all users. For example, bulb-outs, pedestrian preference at curb cuts and street trees can establish important safety, scale, and comfort elements with long lasting impacts and provide the structure for an active and welcoming downtown core. Better paving materials or site furnishings can be added in the future. A proper framework will allow incremental improvements that can make a dramatic impact in the function and safety of the streets which can be the roadway that are in disrepair or pose safety hazards. As private redevelopment takes place in the downtown areas, the city should uses these opportunities to capitalize opposite side of the street if feasible. Improving or modifying numerous blocks at a single time is more cost-effective for construction due to cost-of-scale savings for the contractor. For instance, installation of one block of streetscape and trees will be less expensive than improving a 50 foot frontage, in seven separate locations. Each city should have the standards and ordinances in place to regulate new development and redevelopment in the ways that improve the pedestrian and biking environment. The improvements can also be incorporated into new capital improvement projects such as road paving or sewer line installations within the right-of-way. These projects may present opportunities to add a few feet or a buffer to sidewalks and, when completed in tandem with other capital Funding Strategies may wish to identify particular projects and associated funding amounts based upon time lines, such as: 1 5 years 6 10 years years years improvements for the two downtowns, Overland Park and Mission will work to identify funding sources for particular projects and as part of the various time frames. Capital Improvement Program (CIP) The Capital Improvement Programs (CIPs) in the two cities identify budgeted amounts for various improvements across both cities, ranging from streets, to parks, to various other enhancements across multiple departments. improvements (city-wide). Federal Transit Agency Funds The Federal Transit Agency can provide funding for bike and pedestrian improvements in the vicinity of transit stops. 62 Implementation Strategies OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

63 Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Funding under the SRTS program may be used to identify and reduce barriers and hazards for children walking or biking to school. The cities could explore the feasibility of funding at least part of potential bike and pedestrian improvements through SRTS in order to improve overall connections for children in nearby neighborhoods to travel to and from school. For example, Mission could fund bike and pedestrian improvements in and near the Shawnee children live in the various apartment complexes between Johnson Drive and Martway, and between Lamar and Roeland. Improvements to the various north-south streets in the area (such as Woodson, Outlook, Dearborn, etc.) could be funded through SRTS. In Overland Park, the city could explore funding to help enhance connectivity for children living to the north of 79th Street, to the south and west of Downtown, and to the west of Conser. Community Development Block Grants The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) programs at the federal level provide money for streetscape revitalization, including a variety of pedestrian and bicycle improvements. In particular, cities may use CDBG funds to provide for improved sidewalks and streets. The cities could identify a menu of proposed improvements and prepare a CDBG application in future years. Congestion Mitigation / Air Quality Improvement Program (CMAQ) CMAQ provides federal funding for projects designed to reduce ozone, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter, which reduce transportation emissions. States may use these funds to build bicycle and pedestrian facilities that reduce travel by automobile. Tax Increment Financing Tax Increment Financing (TIF) allows for projects to capture the future gains in taxes (property taxes, or sales and transportation improvements). As part of redevelopment efforts, the cities of Overland Park and Mission could explicitly require any development projects that receive TIF funding to set aside a portion of the total funding to provide for bike and pedestrian improvements outlined in this plan, or to contribute money to a fund established by the city for future bike and pedestrian improvements. For example, a mixed-use project on Marty in improvements for Marty Street, or contribute commensurate funding levels to a dedicated fund for the future overall improvement to the entire block of Marty, from 79th to 80th Street. Business Improvement District (BID) Downtown Overland Park currently includes a Business Improvement District (the Downtown Overland Park Partnership) that mainly focuses on marketing efforts. Downtown Mission does not currently have an organized BID in place. BIDs around the country regularly include efforts to improve or fund bicycle and pedestrian improvements levies, for example, that would fund bike and pedestrian improvements in a given district. These improvements may include items such as wider sidewalks, landscaping, and ADA compliance. BIDs in each downtown could help coordinate and fund these improvements as part of an overall strategy of revitalization, in both Overland Park and Mission. Community Improvement Districts (CIDs) Cities often use CIDs to construct more localized projects, such as a particular segment of streets, sidewalks, or Cities are able to structure CIDs in various ways, with some CIDs absorbing the entire cost of a particular type of corridors within the two downtowns. Implementation Strategies 63

64 Developer Impact Fees The cities could consider including fees associated with bike and pedestrian improvements as part of overall developer impact fees for particular development projects in and near the two downtowns. In many cases, cities charge impact fees to new projects based upon the number of vehicular trips generated by the new development. If a development can demonstrate that bike or pedestrian improvements would result in a reduction in the number of trips, the developer could receive a discount on its overall impact fee assessment. Property Tax Levies Many cities around the country institute property tax levies to fund bike and pedestrian improvements city-wide. Overland Park and Mission could use property tax levies to fund a variety of bike and pedestrian improvements in 64 Implementation Strategies OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

65 POTENTIAL GRANT SOURCES: FUNDING NAME AGENCY SUMMARY SOURCE Preserve America Grant Program National Park Service signage, public art and many other project types have been provided to communities designated as Preserve America Communities for projects aimed at preserving the country s cultural and natural heritage assets and supporting economic vitality. hpg/preserveamerica/index.htm TIGER Grants U.S. DOT Invest in communities to make them more livable and sustainable. Project must be multi-modal, or otherwise challenging to fund. Transportation Enhancement (TE) Activities FHWA administered by State Federally Funded, community based projects that expand travel choices and enhance the transportation experience, including, streetscape, bike and pedestrian improvements. Section 402 Grants NHTSA/FHWA Funds apportioned to states, who then distribute to projects, often overlooked, but can be used for pedestrian and bicycle org/docs/section_402.pdf safety, and speed control projects. Transportation, Community, and System Preservation Program (TCSP) FHWA Discretionary grant for projects seeking to improve impacts,and identify strategies to encourage economic development in communities National Urban and Community Forestry Grant USDA-Forest Service Encourages community connections between urban forests planting of trees by individuals or property owners. Air Quality Grants EPA Competitive grant funding for projects and programs relating to air quality, transportation, climate change, indoor air and other related topics. funding.html Targeted Watersheds Grant Program EPA Grants for water pollution prevention and wetlands protection, and tribal grants. funding/twg/initiative_index.cfm National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council (NUCFAC) grants U.S. Forest Service Grants change each year; overall goal to address urban and community forestry. html Community Transformation Grants (CTG) CDC Funding for projects that address the health of communities through increasing the availability of healthy foods and beverages, improving access to safe places for physical activity, and reducing tobacco use and encouraging smokefree environments. communitytransformation/ Bikes Belong Bikes Belong Coalition Provides grants to municipalities and grassroots organizations to support biking projects. Aims to "connect existing facilities or create new opportunities; leverage generate economic activity." Eligible projects include bike paths, trails, routes, and bike lanes. grants/ Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Active Living by Design RWJF Fund community health initiatives including some funding for built-projects such as bike trails. html Implementation Strategies 65

66

67 7 APPENDIX Appendix 67

68 Keypad Polling and Online Survey Results: The following tables and charts depict the results of public input collected at the public meeting held October 29th, 2012 in which 51 meeting attendees responded to a set of instant feedback keypad polling questions. The same set of questions was also posted as an online survey for those who could not attend the meeting in person. A total of 18 responses were collected from the online survey. Very Poor 2% 1 0% 0 1% 1 Poor 4% 2 0% 0 3% 2 Neutral 22% 11 37% 7 26% 18 Good 69% 35 53% 10 64% 45 Very Good 4% 2 11% 2 6% 4 Very Poor Poor Neutral Good Very Good Very Poor 8% 4 22% 4 11% 8 Poor 48% 24 28% 5 41% 29 Neutral 38% 19 39% 7 37% 26 Good 6% 3 11% 2 7% 5 Very Good 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 Very Poor Poor Neutral Good Very Good 68 Appendix OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

69 Identify designated bike routes 24 47% 13 68% 37 53% Provide dedicated bike lanes 26 51% 5 26% 31 44% Provide wider sidewalks and space for outdoor dining 18 35% 12 63% 30 43% Improve public open spaces 13 25% 10 53% 23 33% Improve bicycle safety 17 33% 2 11% 19 27% Improve sidewalks and crosswalks connections 14 27% 5 26% 19 27% Provide increased site furniture 4 8% 5 26% 9 13% Improve connections to local businesses 6 12% 3 16% 9 13% Improve crosswalks in the downtown area 5 10% 1 5% 6 9% Other 0 0% 1 5% 1 1% Identify designated bike routes Provide dedicated bike lanes Provide wider sidewalks and space for outdoor dining Improve public open spaces Improve bicycle safety Improve sidewalks and crosswalks connections Provide increased site furniture Improve connections to local businesses Improve crosswalks in the downtown area Other Appendix 69

70 Identify designated bike routes in downtown and surrounding neighborhoods % 9 56% 31 46% Provide dedicated bike lanes % 5 31% 30 45% Improve sidewalks and crosswalks connecting neighborhoods to downtown % 4 25% 26 39% Improve bicycle safety 17 33% 3 19% 20 30% Improve public open spaces (plazas, parks, etc) 10 20% 10 63% 20 30% Provide wider sidewalks and space for outdoor dining. NA NA 11 69% 11 16% Improve crosswalks in the downtown area % 0 0% 10 15% Provide increased site furniture (benches, trash receptacles, bike racks, etc.) 4 8% 3 19% 7 10% Improve connections to local businesses. 5 10% 2 13% 7 10% Other 0 0% 2 13% 2 3% Identify designated bike routes in downtown and surrounding neighborhoods. Provide dedicated bike lanes. Improve sidewalks and crosswalks connecting neighborhoods to downtown. Improve bicycle safety Improve public open spaces (plazas, parks, etc) Provide wider sidewalks and space for outdoor dining. Improve crosswalks in the downtown area. Provide increased site furniture (benches, trash receptacles, bike racks, etc.) Improve connections to local businesses. Other 70 Appendix OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

71 Marked bike routes 16 31% 7 37% 23 33% On street bike lanes 30 59% 5 26% 35 50% Shared use biking / walking trails 18 35% 10 53% 28 40% Signage / pavement markings 16 31% 6 32% 22 31% Bicycle parking 9 18% 8 42% 17 24% Bike sharing program 2 4% 1 5% 3 4% Other 2 4% 0 0% 2 3% Marked bike routes On street bike lanes Shared use biking / walking trails Signage / pavement markings Bicycle parking Bike sharing program Other Marked bike routes 16 31% 7 44% 23 34% On street bike lanes 27 53% 4 25% 31 46% Shared use biking / walking trails 17 33% 9 56% 26 39% Signage / pavement markings 21 41% 5 31% 26 39% Bicycle parking 4 8% 6 38% 10 15% Bike sharing program 2 4% 1 6% 3 4% Other 1 2% 0 0% 1 1% Marked bike routes On street bike lanes Shared use biking / walking trails Signage / pavement markings Bicycle parking Bike sharing program Other Appendix 71

72 Traffic speeds 7 14% 2 11% 9 13% Traffic congestion 10 20% 4 22% 14 20% Overall vehicular safety / too many accidents 6 12% 0 0% 6 9% The safety of pedestrians crossing the street 20 39% 9 50% 29 42% The lack of facilities (e.g. bike lanes, bike path, etc.) for bicycles % 14 78% 49 71% Too difficult to make left turns at intersections or into individual businesses 5 10% 5 28% 10 14% Other 3 6% 1 6% 4 6% Traffic speeds Traffic congestion Overall vehicular safety / too many accidents The safety of pedestrians crossing the street The lack of facilities (e.g. bike lanes, bike path, etc.) for bicycles. Too difficult to make left turns at intersections or into individual businesses Other Traffic speeds 5 10% 4 25% 9 13% Traffic congestion 8 16% 2 13% 10 15% Overall vehicular safety / too many accidents 4 8% 0 0% 4 6% Too little identification of the downtown area 8 16% 7 44% 15 22% The safety of pedestrian crossings 20 39% 7 44% 27 40% The lack of bike facilities (e.g. bike lanes, bike path, etc.) 36 71% 11 69% 47 70% Other 2 4% 1 6% 3 4% Traffic speeds Traffic congestion Overall vehicular safety / too many accidents Too little identification of the downtown area The safety of pedestrian crossings The lack of bike facilities (e.g. bike lanes, bike path, etc.) Other 72 Appendix OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

73 Maintain and expand the Farmers Market 17 33% 8 42% 25 36% Preserve buildings so historic character doesn t change 15 29% 4 21% 19 27% Encourage redevelopment projects to bring in more businesses and 19 37% 13 68% 32 residents 46% Maintain a broad and eclectic mix of locally owned and operated businesses 29 57% 12 63% 41 59% Improve street system to alleviate traffic congestion 9 18% 2 11% 11 16% Add more landscaping to street / sidewalk areas 6 12% 4 21% 10 14% Provide more parking 5 10% 2 11% 7 10% Improve the balance of transportation options (auto, bus, bike, walking) 31 61% 10 53% 41 59% Other 2 4% 0 0% 2 3% Maintain and expand the Farmers Market Preserve buildings so historic character doesn t change Encourage redevelopment projects to bring in more businesses and residents Maintain a broad and eclectic mix of locally owned and operated businesses Improve street system to alleviate traffic congestion Add more landscaping to street / sidewalk areas Provide more parking Improve the balance of transportation options (auto, bus, bike, walking) Other Appendix 73

74 Installing / enhancing signage to key civic / community destinations 36 71% 7 37% 43 61% Enhancing signage for street addresses 7 14% 6 32% 13 19% Enhancing signage for cross streets (including signage on traffic signals) 21 41% 6 32% 27 39% Enhancing / improving quality of signage for individual businesses 11 22% 9 47% 20 29% Managing temporary signs 1 2% 5 26% 6 9% Identifying downtown as a distinctive and unique area 30 59% 16 84% 46 66% Enhancing signage that identifies public parking lots 12 24% 6 32% 18 26% Other 4 8% 1 5% 5 7% Installing / enhancing signage to key civic / community destinations Enhancing signage for street addresses Enhancing signage for cross streets (including signage on traffic signals) Enhancing / improving quality of signage for individual businesses Managing temporary signs Identifying downtown as a distinctive and unique area Enhancing signage that identifies public parking lots Other 74 Appendix OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

75 Installing / enhancing signage to key civic / community destinations 34 67% 6 40% 40 61% Enhancing signage for street addresses 10 20% 5 33% 15 23% Enhancing signage for cross streets (including signage on traffic signals) 21 41% 6 40% 27 41% Enhancing / improving quality of signage for individual businesses 16 31% 10 67% 26 39% Managing temporary signs 7 14% 6 40% 13 20% Identifying downtown as a distinctive and unique area 31 61% 11 73% 42 64% Enhancing signage that identifies public parking lots 7 14% 0 0% 7 11% Other 0 0% 1 7% 1 2% Installing / enhancing signage to key civic / community destinations Enhancing signage for street addresses Enhancing signage for cross streets (including signage on traffic signals) Enhancing / improving quality of signage for individual businesses Managing temporary signs Identifying downtown as a distinctive and unique area Enhancing signage that identifies public parking lots Other Appendix 75

76 Matt Ross Community Center % 14 74% % Overland Park Farmers Market 42 82% 16 84% 58 83% Santa Fe Commons (park) 24 47% 7 37% 31 44% Downtown Shopping Areas % 15 79% 68 97% Places of Worship 20 39% 0 0% 20 29% Nearby Schools 38 75% 5 26% 43 61% Offices 11 22% 0 0% 11 16% Matt Ross Community Center Overland Park Farmers Market Santa Fe Commons (park) Downtown Shopping Areas Places of Worship Nearby Schools Offices 76 Appendix OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

77 Answer Options Sylvester Powell Community Center 10 67% City Hall 0 0% Andersen Park 9 60% HyVee 9 60% Target 6 40% Mission Transit Center (on Johnson Drive) 10 67% Other (please specify) 1 7% Sylvester Powell Community Center City Hall Andersen Park HyVee Target Mission Transit Center (on Johnson Drive) Other (please specify) Appendix 77

78 Keep the existing street section 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% Install sharrows 25 52% 4 31% 29 45% Widen sidewalks where possible 12 25% 6 46% 18 28% None of the above 6 13% 0 0% 6 9% I don t know 5 10% 3 23% 8 13% Keep the existing street section Install sharrows Widen sidewalks where possible None of the above I don t know Keep the existing street section 3 7% 1 8% 4 6% Narrow the drive lanes to provide for wider sidewalks 21 47% 6 50% 27 43% None of the above 10 22% 1 8% 11 17% I don t know 11 24% 4 33% 15 24% Keep the existing street section Narrow the drive lanes to provide for wider sidewalks None of the above I don t know 78 Appendix OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

79 Keep the existing street section 3 6% 0 0% 3 4% Install sharrows on Santa Fe 15 31% 9 56% 24 36% Convert angled parking to parallel parking 23 48% 4 25% 27 40% None of the above 6 13% 0 0% 6 9% I don t know 1 2% 3 19% 4 6% Keep the existing street section Install sharrows on Santa Fe Convert angled parking to parallel parking None of the above I don t know Keep the existing street section 3 6% 0 0% 3 4% Install sharrows on 80th Street 18 38% 5 31% 23 34% Make room to widen the sidewalks 18 38% 10 63% 28 42% None of the above 2 4% 0 0% 2 3% I don t know 6 13% 1 6% 7 10% Keep the existing street section Install sharrows on 80th Street Make room to widen the sidewalks None of the above I don t know Appendix 79

80 Keep the existing street section 3 6% 1 6% 4 6% Install sharrows on Marty 10 21% 7 44% 17 25% Narrow the drive lanes to provide room for bike lanes 27 56% 7 44% 34 51% None of the above 3 6% 0 0% 3 4% I don t know 5 10% 1 6% 6 9% Keep the existing street section Install sharrows on Marty Narrow the drive lanes to provide room for bike lanes None of the above I don t know Bulb outs to reduce crossing distance and slow traffic 21 41% 9 56% 30 45% Improved crosswalk markings 14 27% 9 56% 23 34% Better sidewalk surfaces 18 35% 7 44% 25 37% Buffered sidewalks 9 18% 7 44% 16 24% Median Refuges 18 35% 3 19% 21 31% Improved, pedestrian scale lighting 14 27% 2 13% 16 24% Better directional signage 3 6% 2 13% 5 7% More compact land uses 16 31% 6 38% 22 33% Signalized crossings 12 24% 3 19% 15 22% Bulb outs to reduce crossing distance and slow traffic Improved crosswalk markings Better sidewalk surfaces Buffered sidewalks Median Refuges Improved, pedestrian scale lighting Better directional signage More compact land uses Signalized crossings 80 Appendix OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

81 Bulb outs to reduce crossing distance and slow traffic 27 53% 5 45% 32 52% Improved crosswalk markings 13 25% 3 27% 16 26% Better sidewalk surfaces 23 45% 5 45% 28 45% Buffered sidewalks 9 18% 5 45% 14 23% Median Refuges 15 29% 3 27% 18 29% Improved, pedestrian scale lighting 15 29% 3 27% 18 29% Better directional signage 3 6% 2 18% 5 8% More compact land uses 14 27% 6 55% 20 32% Signalized crossings 11 22% 1 9% 12 19% Bulb outs to reduce crossing distance and slow traffic Improved crosswalk markings Better sidewalk surfaces Buffered sidewalks Median Refuges Improved, pedestrian scale lighting Better directional signage More compact land uses Signalized crossings Appendix 81

82 Shawnee 0 0% 1 6% 1 1% Merriam 1 2% 2 13% 3 4% Overland Park 25 53% 6 38% 31 46% Mission 7 15% 4 25% 11 16% Another city in Johnson County 9 19% 1 6% 10 15% Elsewhere in the KC Metro 4 9% 2 13% 6 9% Other 1 2% 0 0% 1 1% Shawnee Merriam Overland Park Mission Another city in Johnson County Elsewhere in the KC Metro Other Business patron 28 55% 5 31% 33 49% Commuter 23 45% 5 31% 28 42% Nearby resident 22 43% 10 63% 32 48% City Official or Elected Leader 8 16% 2 13% 10 15% Property owner 4 8% 1 6% 5 7% Other 3 6% 0 0% 3 4% Business owner 0 0% 1 6% 1 1% Business patron Commuter Nearby resident City Official or Elected Leader Property owner Other Business owner 82 Appendix OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

83 Business patron 25 49% 3 23% 28 44% Nearby resident 15 29% 10 77% 25 39% Commuter 13 25% 3 23% 16 25% Property owner 3 6% 1 8% 4 6% Other 2 4% 0 0% 2 3% Business owner 1 2% 0 0% 1 2% City Official or Elected Leader 1 2% 1 8% 2 3% Business patron Nearby resident Commuter Property owner Other Business owner City Official or Elected Leader Under % 0 0% 0 0% % 0 0% 0 0% % 4 25% 13 19% % 10 63% 20 30% % 2 13% 23 34% Over % 0 0% 5 7% Under Over 65 Appendix 83

84 Map Activity: After the presentation at the October 29th public meeting, participants were invited to participate in a map activity where they mapped their common walking and biking routes, places they go often, and barriers they encounter along the way. destinations that people commonly walk or bike to and barriers along their routes. Figure 17: Public Feedback Map - Downtown Mission Destinations and Barriers Broadmoor Park Transit Station HyVee Johnson County Northeast Offices Community Center Anderson Park Target Barrier Destination (number of times selected) Travel Route 84 Appendix OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

85 Figure 18: Public Feedback Map - Downtown Overland Park Destinations and Barriers Farmers Market Santa Fe Commons Park Matt Ross Community Center Barrier Destination (number of times selected) Travel Route Appendix 85

86 Figure 19: Public Feedback Map - Destinations and Routes between Overland Park and Mission Downtown Mission Downtown Overland Park Destination Travel Route 86 Appendix OVERLAND PARK & MISSION Enhancing Downtown Accessibility

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