MS.RAJA ELGADY/PRESSURE PAPER 3

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "MS.RAJA ELGADY/PRESSURE PAPER 3"

Transcription

1 1- (a) A water tank has a rectangular base of dimensions 1.5m by 1.2m and contains 1440 kg of water. Calculate (i) the weight of the water, weight = [1] (ii) the pressure exerted by the water on the base of the tank. pressure = [2] (b) Fig. 5.1 shows two water tanks P and Q of different shape. Both tanks are circular when viewed from above. The tanks each contain the same volume of water. The depth of water in both tanks is 1.4 m. 1.4 m P Q F i g (i) The density of water is 1000 kg / m 3. The pressures exerted by the water on the base of the two tanks are equal. Calculate this pressure. pressure =... [2] (ii) Equal small volumes of water are removed from each tank.

2 ure on its base. Explain your answer For Examiner s Use [2] [Total: 7 ] 2- Fig. 4.1 represents part of the hydraulic braking system of a car. piston X piston Y F 1 F 2 Fig. 4.1 The force F 1 of the driver s foot on the brake pedal moves piston X. The space between pistons X and Y is filled with oil which cannot be compressed. The force F 2 exerted by the oil moves piston Y. This force is applied to the brake mechanism in the wheels of the car.

3 The area of cross-section of piston X is 4.8 cm 2. (a) The force F 1 is 90N. Calculate the pressure exerted on the oil by piston X. pressure =... [2] (b) The pressure on piston Y is the same as the pressure applied by piston X. Explain why the force F 2 is greater than the force F [1] (c) Piston Y moves a smaller distance than piston X. Explain why [2] (d) Suggest why the braking system does not work properly if the oil contains bubbles of air [2] [Total: 7]

4 3- (a) Complete Fig. 4.1 to show a simple mercury barometer. Insert the correct labels in the boxes. Label with the letter h the measurement required to calculate the pressure of the atmosphere. Fig. 4.1 [3] (b) The value of h taken using this barometer is 0.73m. The density of mercury is kg / m 3. Calculate the value of the atmospheric pressure suggested by this measurement. Use g = 10m/ s 2. atmospheric pressure =...[2] (c) Standard atmospheric pressure is 0.76 m of mercury. Suggest a reason why the value of h in (b) is lower than this [1] [Total: 6]

5 4- A vertical cylinder has a smooth well-fitting piston in it. Weights can be added to or removed from a tray on the top of the piston. (a) Weights are added to the tray, as shown in Fig For Examiner s Use weights piston air cylinder Fig. 6.1 (i) State what happens to the pressure of the air in the cylinder as a result of adding these weights.... [1] (ii) The initial pressure of the trapped air is Pa. When the weights are added, the volume of the air decreases from 860 cm 3 to 645 cm 3. The temperature of the air does not change. Calculate the final pressure of the trapped air. (iii) The area of the piston is m 2. Calculate the weight that is added to the piston. pressure =... [3] weight added =... [4]

6

7 (b) The weights are kept as shown in Fig The temperature of the air in the cylinder is increased. (i) State what happens to the volume of the air in the cylinder as a result of this temperature rise.... [1] (ii) State how, if at all, the pressure of the air changes as the temperature changes.... [1] (iii) State what must be done to prevent the volume change in (b)(i).... [1] (iv) The volume change in (b)(i) is prevented. State what happens to the pressure of the air in the cylinder.... [1] [Total: 12]

8 5- Fig. 3.1 shows a pond that is kept at a constant depth by a pressure-operated valve in the base. For Examiner s Use water outlet spring pressure-operated valve Fig. 3.1 (a) The pond is kept at a depth of 2.0 m. The density of water is 1000 kg/m 3. Calculate the water pressure on the valve. pressure =.. [2] (b) The force required to open the valve is 50 N. The valve will open when the water depth reaches 2.0 m. Calculate the area of the valve. area =.. [2] (c) The water supply is turned off and the valve is held open so that water drains out through the valve. State the energy changes of the water that occur as the depth of the water drops from 2.0 m to zero [2]

9 6- A large stone block is to be part of a harbour wall. The block is supported beneath the surface of the sea by a cable from a crane. Fig. 2.1 shows the block with its top face a distance h beneath the surface of the sea. cable surface of sea h block Fig. 2.1 The force acting downwards on the top face of the block, due to the atmosphere and the depth h of water, is N. (a) The top face of the block has an area of 0.25 m 2. (i) Calculate the pressure on the top face of the block. pressure =... [2] (ii) The atmospheric pressure is Pa. Calculate the pressure on the top face of the block due to the depth h of water. (iii) The density of sea water is 1020kg / m 3. Calculate the depth h. pressure =... [1] h =... [2]

10 (b) Suggest two reasons why the tension force in the cable is not N [2] (c) The block is lowered so that it rests on the sea-bed. State what happens to the tension force in the cable.... [1] [Total: 8]

11 6 (a) Complete the following statements by writing appropriate words in the spaces. The pressure of a gas in a sealed container is caused by the collisions of... with the container wall. For Examiner s Use An increase in the temperature of the gas increases the pressure because the... of the... increases. The force on the wall due to the gas is the pressure multiplied by the... of the wall. [2] (b) A mountaineer takes a plastic bottle containing some water to the top of a mountain. He removes the cap from the bottle, drinks all the water and then replaces the cap, as shown in Fig On returning to the base of the mountain, he finds that the bottle has collapsed to a much smaller volume, as shown in Fig Fig. 6.1 Fig. 6.2 (i) Explain why the bottle collapsed [2]

12

13 (ii) At the top of the mountain the atmospheric pressure was Pa and the volume of the bottle was 250 cm 3. Calculate the volume of the bottle at the base of the mountain where the pressure of the air inside the bottle is Pa. Assume no change of temperature. volume =... [3] [Total: 7]

14 7- (a) Fig. 3.1 shows an oil can containing only air at atmospheric pressure. can Atmospheric pressure is Pa. Fig. 3.1 The pressure of the air in the can is reduced by means of a pump. The can collapses when the pressure of the air in the can falls to 6000Pa. (i) Explain why the can collapses [1] (ii) The surface area of face X of the can is 0.12 m 2. Calculate the resultant force on face X when the can collapses. force =...[3]

15 (b) Mercury is poured into a U-shaped glass tube. Water is then poured into one of the limbs of the tube. Oil is poured into the other limb until the surfaces of the mercury are at the same level in both limbs. Fig. 3.2 shows the result m oil water 0.25 m mercury Fig. 3.2 (i) State a condition that must be true in order for the mercury surfaces to be at the same level in both limbs of the tube [1] (ii) The height of the water column is 0.25m. The height of the oil column is 0.32m. The density of water is 1000kg / m 3. Calculate 1. the pressure exerted by the water on the surface of the mercury, 2. the density of the oil. pressure =...[2] density =...[2] [Total: 9]

16 8- A thermometer uses the value of a physical property to indicate the temperature. (a) A particular thermometer is sensitive, linear and has a wide range. For Examiner s Use Draw a straight line from each characteristic of this thermometer to the appropriate feature. characteristic of thermometer feature of thermometer reacts quickly to change of temperature sensitive large difference between highest and lowest measurable temperatures linear same change of physical property for same change of temperature wide range fixed points at 0 C and 100 C large change of physical property for small change of temperature [3] (b) (i) In the space below, draw a diagram to show the structure of a thermocouple thermometer. [2]

17

18 (ii) Explain why a thermocouple thermometer is particularly well suited to measure 1. high temperatures, very rapidly changing temperatures [2] [Total: 7]

19 9- (a) One of the laws about the behaviour of gases states that For a fixed amount of gas at constant temperature, the pressure is inversely proportional to the volume. In the space below, write an equation that represents this law. For Exam iner s Use [1] (b) Table 4.1 gives a series of pressures and their corresponding volumes, obtained in an experiment with a fixed amount of gas. The gas obeys the law referred to in (a). pressure/ kpa volume / cm Table 4.1 How do these figures indicate that the temperature was constant throughout the experiment? [2] (c) Air is trapped by a piston in a cylinder. The pressure of the air is Pa. The distance from the closed end of the cylinder to the piston is 75 mm. The piston is pushed in until the pressure of the air has risen to Pa. Calculate how far the piston has moved. distance moved =.... [4] [Total: 7]

20 10 - (a) MS.RAJA ELGADY/PRESSURE PAPER 3 A submarine descends to a depth of 70m below the surface of water. The density of the water is 1050kg/m 3. Atmospheric pressure is Pa. Calculate (i) the increase in pressure as it descends from the surface to a depth of 70 m, For Exami ner s Use increase in pressure =... [2] (ii) the total pressure on the submarine at a depth of 70m. total pressure =... [1] (b) On another dive, the submarine experiences a total pressure of Pa. A hatch cover on the submarine has an area of 2.5m 2. Calculate the force on the outside of the cover. force =... [2]

21 (c) The submarine undergoes tests in fresh water of density 1000kg/m 3. Explain why the pressure on the submarine is less at the same depth [1] [Total: 6]

22 11- During a period of hot weather, the atmospheric pressure on the pond in Fig. 3.1 remains constant. Water evaporates from the pond, so that the depth h decreases. force due to air pressure h Fig. 3.1 (a) Study the diagram and state, giving your reason, what happens during this hot period to (i) the force of the air on the surface of the pond, [1] (ii) the pressure at the bottom of the pond [1] (b) On a certain day, the pond is 12m deep. (i) Water has a density of 1000kg / m 3. Calculate the pressure at the bottom of the pond due to the water. pressure due to the water =...[2]

23 (ii) Atmospheric pressure on that day is Pa. Calculate the total pressure at the bottom of the pond. total pressure =...[1] (iii) A bubble of gas is released from the mud at the bottom of the pond. Its initial volume is 0.5 cm 3. Ignoring any temperature differences in the water, calculate the volume of the bubble as it reaches the surface. volume =...[2] (iv) In fact, the temperature of the water is greater at the top than at the bottom of the pond. Comment on the bubble volume you have calculated in (b)(iii) [1] [Total: 8]

24 12- Fig. 4.1 shows a sealed steel cylinder filled with high pressure steam. Examiner s Use steam Fig. 4.1 Fig. 4.2 shows the same cylinder much later when all the steam has condensed. water Fig. 4.2 (a) (i) Describe the movement of the molecules in the high pressure steam [2] (ii) Explain how the molecules in the steam exert a high pressure on the inside walls of the cylinder [2] (b) Describe, in terms of particles, the process by which heat is transferred through the cylinder wall [2] (c) When all the steam has condensed, 75g of water is in the cylinder. Under these high pressure conditions, the specific latent heat of vaporisation of steam is 3200 J/g. Calculate the heat lost by the steam as it condenses. heat =... [2] [Total: 8]

25 13- (a) (i) Define pressure [1] For Examiner s Use (ii) A closed box contains a gas. Explain, in terms of molecules, how the gas exerts a pressure on the walls of the box [3] (b) Fig. 6.1 shows a flask connected to a pump and also to a manometer containing mercury. to pump manometer 250 mm flask Fig. 6.1 The right-hand tube of the manometer is open to the atmosphere. The pump has been operated so that the mercury levels differ, as shown, by 250 mm. The density of mercury is kg / m 3. (i) Calculate the pressure, in Pa, due to the 250mm column of mercury. pressure =... [2]

26

27 (ii) The pressure of the atmosphere is Pa. Calculate the pressure of the air in the flask. pressure =... [1] [Total: 7]

28

Slide 5 / What is the difference between the pressure on the bottom of a pool and the pressure on the water surface? A ρgh B ρg/h C ρ/gh D gh/ρ

Slide 5 / What is the difference between the pressure on the bottom of a pool and the pressure on the water surface? A ρgh B ρg/h C ρ/gh D gh/ρ Slide 1 / 47 1 Two substances mercury with a density 13600 kg/m3 and alcohol with a density 800 kg/m3 are selected for an experiment. If the experiment requires equal masses of each liquid, what is the

More information

THERMODYNAMICS, HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER TUTORIAL NO: 1 (SPECIFIC VOLUME, PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE)

THERMODYNAMICS, HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER TUTORIAL NO: 1 (SPECIFIC VOLUME, PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE) THERMODYNAMICS, HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER TUTORIAL NO: 1 (SPECIFIC VOLUME, PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE) 1. A vacuum gauge mounted on a condenser reads 66 cm Hg. What is the absolute pressure in the condenser

More information

Gas Laws. Introduction

Gas Laws. Introduction Gas Laws Introduction In 1662 Robert Boyle found that, at constant temperature, the pressure of a gas and its volume are inversely proportional such that P x V = constant. This relationship is known as

More information

. In an elevator accelerating upward (A) both the elevator accelerating upward (B) the first is equations are valid

. In an elevator accelerating upward (A) both the elevator accelerating upward (B) the first is equations are valid IIT JEE Achiever 2014 Ist Year Physics-2: Worksheet-1 Date: 2014-06-26 Hydrostatics 1. A liquid can easily change its shape but a solid cannot because (A) the density of a liquid is smaller than that of

More information

UNIQUE SCIENCE ACADEMY

UNIQUE SCIENCE ACADEMY 1 (a) UNIQUE SIENE EMY Test (Unit 7) Name :... Paper: Physics ate : 04.07.2011 ode: 5054 lass: I Time llowed: 35Minutes Maximum Marks: 25 1 Theory Section: What do you understand by the term pressure.

More information

Slide 1 / What is the density of an aluminum block with a mass of 4050 kg and volume of 1.5 m 3?

Slide 1 / What is the density of an aluminum block with a mass of 4050 kg and volume of 1.5 m 3? Slide 1 / 68 1 What is the density of an aluminum block with a mass of 4050 kg and volume of 1.5 m 3? Slide 2 / 68 2 What is the mass of a rectangular shaped ice block with dimensions of 0.04m x 0.05m

More information

Assistant Lecturer Anees Kadhum AL Saadi

Assistant Lecturer Anees Kadhum AL Saadi Pressure Variation with Depth Pressure in a static fluid does not change in the horizontal direction as the horizontal forces balance each other out. However, pressure in a static fluid does change with

More information

and its weight (in newtons) when located on a planet with an acceleration of gravity equal to 4.0 ft/s 2.

and its weight (in newtons) when located on a planet with an acceleration of gravity equal to 4.0 ft/s 2. 1.26. A certain object weighs 300 N at the earth's surface. Determine the mass of the object (in kilograms) and its weight (in newtons) when located on a planet with an acceleration of gravity equal to

More information

1. The principle of fluid pressure that is used in hydraulic brakes or lifts is that:

1. The principle of fluid pressure that is used in hydraulic brakes or lifts is that: University Physics (Prof. David Flory) Chapt_15 Thursday, November 15, 2007 Page 1 Name: Date: 1. The principle of fluid pressure that is used in hydraulic brakes or lifts is that: A) pressure is the same

More information

Chapter 13. Gases. Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved 1

Chapter 13. Gases. Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved 1 Chapter 13 Gases Copyright Cengage Learning. All rights reserved 1 Section 13.1 Pressure Why study gases? An understanding of real world phenomena. An understanding of how science works. Copyright Cengage

More information

Matter is made up of particles which are in continual random motion Misconception: Only when a substance is in its liquid or gas state do its

Matter is made up of particles which are in continual random motion Misconception: Only when a substance is in its liquid or gas state do its Kinetic Theory of Matter Matter is made up of particles which are in continual random motion Misconception: Only when a substance is in its liquid or gas state do its particles move because in these two

More information

In the liquid phase, molecules can flow freely from position. another. A liquid takes the shape of its container. 19.

In the liquid phase, molecules can flow freely from position. another. A liquid takes the shape of its container. 19. In the liquid phase, molecules can flow freely from position to position by sliding over one another. A liquid takes the shape of its container. In the liquid phase, molecules can flow freely from position

More information

In the liquid phase, molecules can flow freely from position to position by sliding over one another. A liquid takes the shape of its container.

In the liquid phase, molecules can flow freely from position to position by sliding over one another. A liquid takes the shape of its container. In the liquid phase, molecules can flow freely from position to position by sliding over one another. A liquid takes the shape of its container. In the liquid phase, molecules can flow freely from position

More information

Kinetic Theory and Gases

Kinetic Theory and Gases Kinetic Theory and Gases Kinetic Theory Explains how temperature and pressure affect the motion of molecules http://exploration.grc.nasa.gov/education/rocket/images/state.gif 1 Hydraulics http://library.thinkquest.org/

More information

Gases and Pressure SECTION 11.1

Gases and Pressure SECTION 11.1 SECTION 11.1 Gases and In the chapter States of Matter, you read about the kineticmolecular theory of matter. You were also introduced to how this theory explains some of the properties of ideal gases.

More information

then the work done is, if the force and the displacement are in opposite directions, then the work done is.

then the work done is, if the force and the displacement are in opposite directions, then the work done is. 1. What is the formula for work? W= x 2. What are the 8 forms of energy? 3. Write the formula for the following: Kinetic Energy Potential Energy 4. If the force and the displacement are in the same direction,

More information

ACTIVITY 1: Buoyancy Problems. OBJECTIVE: Practice and Reinforce concepts related to Fluid Pressure, primarily Buoyancy

ACTIVITY 1: Buoyancy Problems. OBJECTIVE: Practice and Reinforce concepts related to Fluid Pressure, primarily Buoyancy LESSON PLAN: SNAP, CRACKLE, POP: Submarine Buoyancy, Compression, and Rotational Equilibrium DEVELOPED BY: Bill Sanford, Nansemond Suffolk Academy 2012 NAVAL HISTORICAL FOUNDATION TEACHER FELLOWSHIP ACTIVITY

More information

CP Chapter 13/14 Notes The Property of Gases Kinetic Molecular Theory

CP Chapter 13/14 Notes The Property of Gases Kinetic Molecular Theory CP Chapter 13/14 Notes The Property of Gases Kinetic Molecular Theory Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases The word kinetic refers to. Kinetic energy is the an object has because of its motion. Kinetic Molecular

More information

Lecture Presentation. Chapter 10. Gases. John D. Bookstaver St. Charles Community College Cottleville, MO Pearson Education, Inc.

Lecture Presentation. Chapter 10. Gases. John D. Bookstaver St. Charles Community College Cottleville, MO Pearson Education, Inc. Lecture Presentation Chapter 10 John D. Bookstaver St. Charles Community College Cottleville, MO Characteristics of Unlike liquids and solids, gases Expand to fill their containers. Are highly compressible.

More information

Name: Class: Date: SHORT ANSWER Answer the following questions in the space provided.

Name: Class: Date: SHORT ANSWER Answer the following questions in the space provided. CHAPTER 11 REVIEW Gases SECTION 1 SHORT ANSWER Answer the following questions in the space provided. 1. Pressure =. For a constant force, when the surface area is tripled the pressure is (a) doubled. (b)

More information

Mix and Flow of Matter Grade 8 Unit 1 Test

Mix and Flow of Matter Grade 8 Unit 1 Test Mix and Flow of Matter Grade 8 Unit 1 Test Student Class 1. All fluids flow and can be observed by many of the characteristics below. Which of these characteristics would you use to observe a gas flowing?

More information

More About Solids, Liquids and Gases ASSIGNMENT

More About Solids, Liquids and Gases ASSIGNMENT More About Solids, Liquids and Gases ASSIGNMENT 1. Fill in the blank spaces by choosing the correct words from the list given below: List : water, density, altitudes, lateral, intermolecular, force, cohesion,

More information

Gas molecules are far apart. collisions The Atmosphere

Gas molecules are far apart. collisions The Atmosphere Gas molecules are far apart and can move freely between collisions. Gases are similar to liquids in that they flow; hence both are called fluids. In a gas, the molecules are far apart, allowing them to

More information

Chapter 3 PRESSURE AND FLUID STATICS

Chapter 3 PRESSURE AND FLUID STATICS Fluid Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications, 2nd Edition Yunus A. Cengel, John M. Cimbala McGraw-Hill, 2010 Chapter 3 PRESSURE AND FLUID STATICS Lecture slides by Hasan Hacışevki Copyright The McGraw-Hill

More information

1Pressure 2 21Volume 2 2. or Temperature 2. where the subscript 1 signifies the initial conditions and the subscript 2 signifies the final conditions.

1Pressure 2 21Volume 2 2. or Temperature 2. where the subscript 1 signifies the initial conditions and the subscript 2 signifies the final conditions. 10-4 Gases The ideal gas law expresses the relationship between the pressure, volume, and temperature of a gas. In the exercises in this chapter, the mass of the gas remains constant. You will be examining

More information

Unit A: Mix and Flow of Matter

Unit A: Mix and Flow of Matter Unit A: Mix and Flow of Matter Science 8 1 Section 3.0 THE PROPERTIES OF GASES AND LIQUIDS CAN BE EXPLAINED BY THE PARTICLE MODEL OF MATTER. 2 1 Viscosity and the Effects of Temperature Topic 3.1 3 Viscosity

More information

2 Buoyant Force. TAKE A LOOK 2. Identify What produces buoyant force?

2 Buoyant Force. TAKE A LOOK 2. Identify What produces buoyant force? CHAPTER 3 2 Buoyant Force SECTION Forces in Fluids BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What is buoyant force? What makes objects sink or float? How

More information

Chapter 13: The Behavior of Gases

Chapter 13: The Behavior of Gases Chapter 13: The Behavior of Gases I. First Concepts a. The 3 states of matter most important to us: solids, liquids, and gases. b. Real Gases and Ideal Gases i. Real gases exist, ideal gases do not ii.

More information

Pressure Sensor Experiment Guide

Pressure Sensor Experiment Guide Pressure Sensor Experiment Guide Pressure Sensor Introduction: Part of the Eisco series of hand held sensors, the pressure sensor allows students to record and graph data in experiments on the go. This

More information

Fluids, Pressure and buoyancy

Fluids, Pressure and buoyancy Fluids, Pressure and buoyancy Announcements: CAPA due Friday at 10pm. Comment on the hint in Problem 5. CAPA solutions from previous sets can be found by logging onto CAPA and selecting View Previous Set

More information

Fluid Mechanics - Hydrostatics. AP Physics B

Fluid Mechanics - Hydrostatics. AP Physics B luid Mechanics - Hydrostatics AP Physics B States of Matter Before we begin to understand the nature of a luid we must understand the nature of all the states of matter: The 3 primary states of matter

More information

4.) There are no forces of attraction or repulsion between gas particles. This means that

4.) There are no forces of attraction or repulsion between gas particles. This means that KINETIC MOLECULAR (K-M) THEORY OF MATTER NOTES - based on the idea that particles of matter are always in motion - assumptions of the K-M Theory 1.) Gases consist of large numbers of tiny particles that

More information

Pressure of the atmosphere varies with elevation and weather conditions. Barometer- device used to measure atmospheric pressure.

Pressure of the atmosphere varies with elevation and weather conditions. Barometer- device used to measure atmospheric pressure. Chapter 12 Section 1 Pressure A gas exerts pressure on its surroundings. Blow up a balloon. The gas we are most familiar with is the atmosphere, a mixture of mostly elemental nitrogen and oxygen. Pressure

More information

Chapter 13 Gases and Pressure. Pressure and Force. Pressure is the force per unit area on a surface. Force Area. Pressure =

Chapter 13 Gases and Pressure. Pressure and Force. Pressure is the force per unit area on a surface. Force Area. Pressure = Chapter 13 Gas Laws Chapter 13 Gases and Pressure Pressure and Force Pressure is the force per unit area on a surface. Pressure = Force Area Chapter 13 Gases and Pressure Gases in the Atmosphere The atmosphere

More information

Unit 8 Gas Laws. Progress Tracker. Essential Vocabulary: Essential Outcomes: Test Date: Test Readiness Checks: Webassign Due Score

Unit 8 Gas Laws. Progress Tracker. Essential Vocabulary: Essential Outcomes: Test Date: Test Readiness Checks: Webassign Due Score Unit 8 Gas Laws Progress Tracker Test Date: Webassign Due Score Packet Progress Checks Essential Vocabulary: Ideal gas Pressure (atmospheres) Volume Temperature (Kelvin and Celsius) Barometer Partial pressure

More information

To convert to millimeters of mercury, we derive a unit factor related to the equivalent relationship 29.9 in. Hg = 760 mm Hg.

To convert to millimeters of mercury, we derive a unit factor related to the equivalent relationship 29.9 in. Hg = 760 mm Hg. Example Exercise 11.1 Gas Pressure Conversion Meteorologists state that a falling barometer indicates an approaching storm. Given a barometric pressure of 27.5 in. Hg, express the pressure in each of the

More information

Exploring the Properties of Gases. Evaluation copy. 10 cm in diameter and 25 cm high)

Exploring the Properties of Gases. Evaluation copy. 10 cm in diameter and 25 cm high) Exploring the Properties of Gases Computer 30 The purpose of this investigation is to conduct a series of experiments, each of which illustrates a different gas law. You will be given a list of equipment

More information

Lab Dates. CRHS Academic Chemistry Unit 11 Gas Laws Notes

Lab Dates. CRHS Academic Chemistry Unit 11 Gas Laws Notes Name Period CRHS Academic Chemistry Unit 11 Gas Laws Notes Quiz Date Lab Dates Exam Date Notes, Homework, Exam Reviews and Their KEYS located on CRHS Academic Chemistry Website: https://cincochem.pbworks.com

More information

Lecture Outline Chapter 15. Physics, 4 th Edition James S. Walker. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc.

Lecture Outline Chapter 15. Physics, 4 th Edition James S. Walker. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Lecture Outline Chapter 15 Physics, 4 th Edition James S. Walker Chapter 15 Fluids Density Units of Chapter 15 Pressure Static Equilibrium in Fluids: Pressure and Depth Archimedes Principle and Buoyancy

More information

Kinetic-Molecular Theory of Matter

Kinetic-Molecular Theory of Matter Gases Properties of Gases Gas Pressure Gases What gases are important for each of the following: O 2, CO 2 and/or He? A. B. C. D. 1 2 Gases What gases are important for each of the following: O 2, CO 2

More information

Chapter 4, Problem 30.

Chapter 4, Problem 30. Chapter 4, Problem 30. A well-insulated rigid tank contains 5 kg of a saturated liquid vapor mixture of water at l00 kpa. Initially, three-quarters of the mass is in the liquid phase. An electric resistor

More information

Armfield Distillation Column Operation Guidelines

Armfield Distillation Column Operation Guidelines Armfield Distillation Column Operation Guidelines 11-2016 R.Cox Safety SAFETY GLASSES ARE REQUIRED WHEN OPERATING THE DISTILLATION COLUMN Wear gloves when mixing alcohol feedstock The column will become

More information

Outcomes: Example the historical development of the measurement of pressure. Include: Galileo, Toricelli, von Gureick, Pascal, Huygens, Avogadro,

Outcomes: Example the historical development of the measurement of pressure. Include: Galileo, Toricelli, von Gureick, Pascal, Huygens, Avogadro, History of Pressure Outcomes: Example the historical development of the measurement of pressure. Include: Galileo, Toricelli, von Gureick, Pascal, Huygens, Avogadro, Dalton. Describe the various units

More information

PURE SUBSTANCE. Nitrogen and gaseous air are pure substances.

PURE SUBSTANCE. Nitrogen and gaseous air are pure substances. CLASS Third Units PURE SUBSTANCE Pure substance: A substance that has a fixed chemical composition throughout. Air is a mixture of several gases, but it is considered to be a pure substance. Nitrogen and

More information

PSI Chemistry: Gases Multiple Choice Review

PSI Chemistry: Gases Multiple Choice Review PSI Chemistry: Gases Multiple Choice Review Name Kinetic Molecular Theory 1. According to the kinetic-molecular theory, particles of matterare in constant motion (A) have different shapes (B) have different

More information

Phys101 Lectures Fluids I. Key points: Pressure and Pascal s Principle Buoyancy and Archimedes Principle. Ref: 10-1,2,3,4,5,6,7.

Phys101 Lectures Fluids I. Key points: Pressure and Pascal s Principle Buoyancy and Archimedes Principle. Ref: 10-1,2,3,4,5,6,7. Phys101 Lectures 24-25 luids I Key points: Pressure and Pascal s Principle Buoyancy and Archimedes Principle Ref: 10-1,2,3,4,5,6,7. Page 1 10-1 Phases of Matter The three common phases of matter are solid,

More information

Forces in Fluids. Pressure A force distributed over a given area. Equation for Pressure: Pressure = Force / Area. Units for Pressure: Pascal (Pa)

Forces in Fluids. Pressure A force distributed over a given area. Equation for Pressure: Pressure = Force / Area. Units for Pressure: Pascal (Pa) Pressure A force distributed over a given area Equation for Pressure: Pressure = Force / Area Force = Newton s Area = m 2 Units for Pressure: Pascal (Pa) Forces in Fluids Forces in Fluids A woman s high

More information

Unit code: H/ QCF level: 5 Credit value: 15 OUTCOME 3 - STATIC AND DYNAMIC FLUID SYSTEMS TUTORIAL 2 - STATIC FLUID SYSTEMS

Unit code: H/ QCF level: 5 Credit value: 15 OUTCOME 3 - STATIC AND DYNAMIC FLUID SYSTEMS TUTORIAL 2 - STATIC FLUID SYSTEMS Unit 43: Plant and Process Principles Unit code: H/601 44 QCF level: 5 Credit value: 15 OUTCOME 3 - STATIC AN YNAMIC FLUI SYSTEMS TUTORIAL - STATIC FLUI SYSTEMS 3 Understand static and dnamic fluid sstems

More information

Gases Day 12. Phases of Matter

Gases Day 12. Phases of Matter Phases of Matter Gases Day 12 Kinetic Molecular Theory ( Ideal Gases ) 1) The molecules of a gas are in continual, and random, motion of varying speeds. 2) The average kinetic energy of the gas molecules

More information

STATES OF MATTER JEOPARDY

STATES OF MATTER JEOPARDY STATES OF MATTER JEOPARDY A 3 kg mass stretches a spring 10 m. How much distance will a 9 kg mass stretch the same spring? ANS. 30 meters Why are more bands put around the bottom of a wooden hay silo than

More information

Note: You will receive no credit for late submissions. To learn more, read your instructor's Grading Policy. A Law for Scuba Divers

Note: You will receive no credit for late submissions. To learn more, read your instructor's Grading Policy. A Law for Scuba Divers 1/6 2009/11/14 上午 11:12 Manage this Assignment: Chapter 18 Due: 12:00am on Saturday, July 3, 2010 Note: You will receive no credit for late submissions. To learn more, read your instructor's Grading Policy

More information

LOW PRESSURE EFFUSION OF GASES revised by Igor Bolotin 03/05/12

LOW PRESSURE EFFUSION OF GASES revised by Igor Bolotin 03/05/12 LOW PRESSURE EFFUSION OF GASES revised by Igor Bolotin 03/05/ This experiment will introduce you to the kinetic properties of low-pressure gases. You will make observations on the rates with which selected

More information

PRESSURE-TEMPERATURE RELATIONSHIP IN GASES

PRESSURE-TEMPERATURE RELATIONSHIP IN GASES PRESSURE-TEMPERATURE RELATIONSHIP IN GASES LAB PS2.PALM INTRODUCTION Gases are made up of molecules that are in constant motion and exert pressure when they collide with the walls of their container. The

More information

Exercise 5-2. Bubblers EXERCISE OBJECTIVE DISCUSSION OUTLINE. Bubblers DISCUSSION. Learn to measure the level in a vessel using a bubbler.

Exercise 5-2. Bubblers EXERCISE OBJECTIVE DISCUSSION OUTLINE. Bubblers DISCUSSION. Learn to measure the level in a vessel using a bubbler. Exercise 5-2 Bubblers EXERCISE OBJECTIVE Learn to measure the level in a vessel using a bubbler. DISCUSSION OUTLINE The Discussion of this exercise covers the following points: Bubblers How to measure

More information

Chapter 18. The Kinetic-Molecular Theory The Three States of Matter. Lesson Objectives. Introduction

Chapter 18. The Kinetic-Molecular Theory The Three States of Matter. Lesson Objectives. Introduction Chapter 18 The Kinetic-Molecular Theory 18.1 The Three States of Matter Lesson Objectives The student will describe molecular arrangement differences among solids, liquids, and gases. The student will

More information

of Gases Airbags fill with N 2 gas in an accident. Gas is generated by the decomposition of General Properties

of Gases Airbags fill with N 2 gas in an accident. Gas is generated by the decomposition of General Properties BEHAVIOR OF GASES Chapter 12 1 Importance of Gases 2 Hot Air Balloons How Do They Work? 3 Airbags fill with N 2 gas in an accident. Gas is generated by the decomposition of sodium azide,, NaN 3. 2 NaN

More information

Chapter 9 Fluids CHAPTER CONTENTS

Chapter 9 Fluids CHAPTER CONTENTS Flowing fluids, such as the water flowing in the photograph at Coors Falls in Colorado, can make interesting patterns In this chapter, we will investigate the basic physics behind such flow Photo credit:

More information

Name Date Class CHAPTER ASSESSMENT. 1. Equal volumes of gases at the same temperature and pressure contain equal numbers of particles.

Name Date Class CHAPTER ASSESSMENT. 1. Equal volumes of gases at the same temperature and pressure contain equal numbers of particles. Name ate lass HPTER 14 HPTER SSESSMENT Gases Reviewing Vocabulary Match the definition in olumn with the term in olumn. olumn 1. Equal volumes of gases at the same temperature and pressure contain equal

More information

Chapter 3: Atmospheric pressure and temperature

Chapter 3: Atmospheric pressure and temperature Chapter 3: Atmospheric pressure and temperature 3.1 Distribution of pressure with altitude The barometric law Atmospheric pressure declines with altitude, a fact familiar to everyone who has flown in an

More information

This educational seminar discusses creating, measuring, and troubleshooting Rough Vacuum.

This educational seminar discusses creating, measuring, and troubleshooting Rough Vacuum. This educational seminar discusses creating, measuring, and troubleshooting Rough Vacuum. Specifically, today s talk will cover: Brief review of Vacuum Fundamentals Applications Using Rough Vacuum Rough

More information

LOW PRESSURE EFFUSION OF GASES adapted by Luke Hanley and Mike Trenary

LOW PRESSURE EFFUSION OF GASES adapted by Luke Hanley and Mike Trenary ADH 1/7/014 LOW PRESSURE EFFUSION OF GASES adapted by Luke Hanley and Mike Trenary This experiment will introduce you to the kinetic properties of low-pressure gases. You will make observations on the

More information

Density and Buoyancy Notes

Density and Buoyancy Notes Density and Buoyancy Notes Measuring Mass and Volume 3.1 Density A balance can be used to measure the mass of an object. If the object is a liquid, pour it into a graduated cylinder to measure the volume.

More information

Name Date Class STATES OF MATTER. SECTION 13.1 THE NATURE OF GASES (pages )

Name Date Class STATES OF MATTER. SECTION 13.1 THE NATURE OF GASES (pages ) Name Date Class 3 SAES OF MAER SECION 3. HE NAURE OF GASES (pages 385 389) his section introduces the kinetic theory and describes how it applies to gases. It defines gas pressure and explains how temperature

More information

OPERATION MANUAL RTI RHS650 RTI TECHNOLOGIES, INC East Market Street York, PA Manual P/N

OPERATION MANUAL RTI RHS650 RTI TECHNOLOGIES, INC East Market Street York, PA Manual P/N OPERATION MANUAL RTI RHS650 RTI TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 4075 East Market Street York, PA 17402 Manual P/N 035-80589-02 Table of Contents Components... 2 Test... 4 Recovery/Recycling... 5 Evacuation... 7 Charging...

More information

The Ideal Gas Constant

The Ideal Gas Constant Chem 2115 Experiment # 8 The Ideal Gas Constant OBJECTIVE: This experiment is designed to provide experience in gas handling methods and experimental insight into the relationships between pressure, volume,

More information

Process Nature of Process

Process Nature of Process AP Physics Free Response Practice Thermodynamics 1983B4. The pv-diagram above represents the states of an ideal gas during one cycle of operation of a reversible heat engine. The cycle consists of the

More information

Substances that are liquids or solids under ordinary conditions may also exist as gases. These are often referred to as vapors. Properties of Gases

Substances that are liquids or solids under ordinary conditions may also exist as gases. These are often referred to as vapors. Properties of Gases Common Student Misconceptions Students need to be told to always use temperature in Kelvin in gas problems. Students should always use units in gas-law problems to keep track of required conversions. Due

More information

Today: Finish Chapter 13 (Liquids) Start Chapter 14 (Gases and Plasmas)

Today: Finish Chapter 13 (Liquids) Start Chapter 14 (Gases and Plasmas) Today: Finish Chapter 13 (Liquids) Start Chapter 14 (Gases and Plasmas) Gases and plasmas: Preliminaries Will now apply concepts of fluid pressure, buoyancy, flotation of Ch.13, to the atmosphere. Main

More information

Liquids and Gases. O, 1 L = 2.2 lbs H 2. O = 1 kg H 2

Liquids and Gases. O, 1 L = 2.2 lbs H 2. O = 1 kg H 2 Liquids and Gases The unit of volume is the meter cubed, m 3, which is a very large volume. Very often we use cm 3 = cc, or Litres = 10 3 cc Other everyday units are gallons, quarts, pints 1 qt = 2 lbs

More information

Technical Data Sheet TI-F50 Locking Units series KFH

Technical Data Sheet TI-F50 Locking Units series KFH English translation of German original Locking Units series KF Further important practical advice is given in Operating Manual BA-F50., Rod diameter 18 mm 50 mm øz 8 L 2 6 x 6 0 min. 4x30 KF 18 to KF 32,

More information

How does atmospheric pressure vary? Measuring atmospheric pressure at different altitudes above sea level

How does atmospheric pressure vary? Measuring atmospheric pressure at different altitudes above sea level Objective The purpose of this activity is to study atmospheric pressure variations, as we reach higher altitudes, in order to create a hypothesis. The hypothesis will be tested by using the Labdisc air

More information

Guide for Reading. Vocabulary compressibility

Guide for Reading. Vocabulary compressibility 14.1 Properties of Gases Connecting to Your World In organized soccer, there are rules about equipment. For international competitions, the ball s mass must be not more than 450 grams and not less than

More information

Chapter 13 Gases, Vapors, Liquids, and Solids

Chapter 13 Gases, Vapors, Liquids, and Solids Chapter 13 Gases, Vapors, Liquids, and Solids Property is meaning any measurable characteristic of a substance, such as pressure, volume, or temperature, or a characteristic that can be calculated or deduced,

More information

Physics 1021 Experiment 4. Buoyancy

Physics 1021 Experiment 4. Buoyancy 1 Physics 1021 Buoyancy 2 Buoyancy Apparatus and Setup Materials Force probe 1000 ml beaker Vernier Calipers Plastic cylinder String or paper clips Assorted bars and clamps Water Attach the force probe

More information

5. A bead slides on a curved wire, starting from rest at point A in the figure below. If the wire is frictionless, find each of the following.

5. A bead slides on a curved wire, starting from rest at point A in the figure below. If the wire is frictionless, find each of the following. Name: Work and Energy Problems Date: 1. A 2150 kg car moves down a level highway under the actions of two forces: a 1010 N forward force exerted on the drive wheels by the road and a 960 N resistive force.

More information

HYDRAULIC MOBILE LIFTING TABLE

HYDRAULIC MOBILE LIFTING TABLE HYDRAULIC MOBILE LIFTING TABLE MODEL NO: HTL300 & HTL500 PART NO: 7610148 & 76210152 OPERATION & MAINTENANCE INSTRUCTIONS ORIGINAL INSTRUCTIONS GC1116 INTRODUCTION Thank you for purchasing this CLARKE

More information

The Compact, Portable, Efficient and Economical Solution to boost Shop Compressed Air Pressure by 2 or 3 times

The Compact, Portable, Efficient and Economical Solution to boost Shop Compressed Air Pressure by 2 or 3 times Tseries Series AB AB Air Air Boosters Boosters The Compact, Portable, Efficient and Economical Solution to boost Shop Compressed Air Pressure by 2 or 3 times.01/1 MANIFOLD MOUNTED VALVES FOR EASY SERVICING

More information

Ball Float Steam Trap UNA 43 PN 16/CL 125/JIS 10K UNA 46 PN 40/CL 150/CL 300/JIS 10K/JIS 20K DN 80, 100, 150, 3", 4", 6"

Ball Float Steam Trap UNA 43 PN 16/CL 125/JIS 10K UNA 46 PN 40/CL 150/CL 300/JIS 10K/JIS 20K DN 80, 100, 150, 3, 4, 6 Data Sheet 819584-00 Issue Date: 01/17 Ball Float Steam Trap UNA 43 PN 16/C 125/JIS 10K UNA 46 PN 40/C 150/C 300/JIS 10K/JIS 20K DN 80, 100, 150, 3", 4", 6" UNA 43 hl, UNA 46 hl UNA 43 v, UNA 46 v with

More information

How does atmospheric pressure vary? Measuring atmospheric pressure at different altitudes above sea level

How does atmospheric pressure vary? Measuring atmospheric pressure at different altitudes above sea level Dimension 2 Cross Cutting Concepts Dimension 1 Science and Engineering Practices FRAMEWORK FOR K-12 SCIENCE EDUCATION 2012 USA Standards Correlation The Dimension I practices listed below are called out

More information

CHM111 Lab Gas Laws Grading Rubric

CHM111 Lab Gas Laws Grading Rubric Name Team Name CHM111 Lab Gas Laws Grading Rubric Criteria Points possible Points earned Lab Performance Printed lab handout and rubric was brought to lab 3 Safety and proper waste disposal procedures

More information

How to use Solvent Purification System A brief manual

How to use Solvent Purification System A brief manual 1 How to use Solvent Purification System A brief manual By V. Azev. SPS (Figure 1) can be used to collect dry oxygen free solvents into two different types of containers. One of them is a syringe. Syringes

More information

Kinetic Molecular Theory

Kinetic Molecular Theory Kinetic Molecular Theory Name Period Unit 7 HW 1 Worksheet (Goals 1 & 2) 1. Describe how gases, liquids, and solids compare using the following table. Volume (definite or indefinite) Molecular Motion (high,

More information

Priority (Swing) Motors Data and Specifications

Priority (Swing) Motors Data and Specifications s Data and Specifications Specifications HMF 55 HMF 75 HMF 105 cm 3/rev in 3/rev 55 3.36 75 4.57 105 6.40 Pressure Ratings Nominal 5000 PSIG Maximum 6090 PSIG Peak 7250 PSIG Operating Speed Maximum 4100

More information

Chapter 13 Gases. H. Cannon, C. Clapper and T. Guillot Klein High School. Pressure/Temperature Conversions

Chapter 13 Gases. H. Cannon, C. Clapper and T. Guillot Klein High School. Pressure/Temperature Conversions Chapter 13 Gases Pressure/Temperature Conversions Convert the following: 1. 3.50 atm = kpa 2. 123 atm = mmhg 3. 970.0 mmhg = torr 4. 870.0 torr = kpa 5. 250.0 kpa = atm 6. 205.0 mmhg = kpa 7. 12.4 atm

More information

Air Pycnometer. Operating Manual. Umwelt-Geräte-Technik GmbH

Air Pycnometer. Operating Manual. Umwelt-Geräte-Technik GmbH Operating Manual Air Pycnometer Version: 24/05/17 Umwelt-Geräte-Technik GmbH Eberswalder Str. 58 D-15374 Müncheberg phone: +49 (0) 33 43 2-89 575 fax: +49 (0) 33 43 2-89 573 e-mail: info@ugt-online.de

More information

Elements that exist as gases at 25 o C and 1 atmosphere H 2, N 2, O 2, F 2, Cl 2, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn

Elements that exist as gases at 25 o C and 1 atmosphere H 2, N 2, O 2, F 2, Cl 2, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn AP Chemistry Chapter 5 Sections 5. 5.9 Note Organizer Pressure, The Gas Laws of Boyle, Charles, and Avogadro, The Ideal Gas Law, Gas Stoichiometry, Dalton s Law of Partial Pressure, The Kinetic olecular

More information

UNIT 10 - GASES. Notes & Worksheets - Honors

UNIT 10 - GASES. Notes & Worksheets - Honors Ideal Gas Equation 1 WKSHT 1.) What is the pressure exerted by 2.0 moles of an ideal gas when it occupies a volume of 12.0 L at 373 K? 2.) A flashbulb of volume 2.6 cm 3 contains O 2 gas at a pressure

More information

Pressure regulator for water

Pressure regulator for water Pressure regulator for water rass version with VGW and international drinking water approvals Stainless steel version with VGW approval Compact plastic version Manometer port at pressure output The water

More information

The Discussion of this exercise covers the following points:

The Discussion of this exercise covers the following points: Exercise 5-3 Wet Reference Leg EXERCISE OBJECTIVE Learn to measure the level in a vessel using a wet reference leg. DISCUSSION OUTLINE The Discussion of this exercise covers the following points: Measuring

More information

Ir HN Lam BSc(Eng), MSc(Eng), CEng, MIMechE, MCIBSE, MASHRAE, MASME, MHKIE. Test Report on Non-Return Valve for Water Closets

Ir HN Lam BSc(Eng), MSc(Eng), CEng, MIMechE, MCIBSE, MASHRAE, MASME, MHKIE. Test Report on Non-Return Valve for Water Closets c/o Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Hong Kong Pokfulam Road Hong Kong Phone: 28592640 E-mail: hn.lam.hku@hku.hk Ir HN Lam BSc(Eng), MSc(Eng), CEng, MIMechE, MCIBSE, MASHRAE, MASME, MHKIE

More information

Boyle s law Verifying the relation between air pressure and volume measuring air pressure in a closed container.

Boyle s law Verifying the relation between air pressure and volume measuring air pressure in a closed container. Objective The purpose of this activity is to analyze the relationship between the pressure and volume of a confined gas at constant temperature, create a hypothesis and proceed to test it using the Labdisc

More information

Physics, Chapter 8: Hydrostatics (Fluids at Rest)

Physics, Chapter 8: Hydrostatics (Fluids at Rest) University of Nebraska - Lincoln DigitalCommons@University of Nebraska - Lincoln Robert Katz Publications Research Papers in Physics and Astronomy 1958 Physics, Chapter 8: Hydrostatics (Fluids at Rest)

More information

POP Safety Valve. POP Safety Valve INTRODUCTION DEFINITIONS

POP Safety Valve. POP Safety Valve INTRODUCTION DEFINITIONS POP Safety Valve POP Safety Valve INTRODUCTION The effects of exceeding safe pressure levels in an unprotected pressure vessel or system, can have catastrophic effects on both plant and personnel. Safety

More information

Fluids Chapter 13 & 14 Liquids & Gases

Fluids Chapter 13 & 14 Liquids & Gases Fluids Chapter 13 & 14 Liquids & Gases Liquids like solids are difficult to compress. Both liquids and gases can flow, so both are called fluids. The pressure you feel is due to the weight of water (or

More information

Liquid ring compressors

Liquid ring compressors Liquid ring compressors KPH 85220, KPH 85227 Compression pressures: Suction volume flow: 2 to 7 bar 940 to 1450 m³/h CONSTRUCTION TYPE Sterling SIHI liquid ring compressors are displacement compressors

More information

DF1 and DF2 Diffusers

DF1 and DF2 Diffusers 1550650/4 IM-P155-07 ST Issue 4 and Diffusers Installation and Maintenance Instructions 1. Safety information 2. General product information 3. Installation 4. Commissioning 5. Operation 6. Maintenance

More information

Lab. Manual. Fluid Mechanics. The Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

Lab. Manual. Fluid Mechanics. The Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering Lab. Manual of Fluid Mechanics The Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering General Safety rules to be followed in Fluid Mechanics Lab: 1. Always wear shoes before entering lab. 2. Do not touch

More information

Determination of R: The Gas-Law Constant

Determination of R: The Gas-Law Constant Determination of R: The Gas-Law Constant PURPOSE: EXPERIMENT 9 To gain a feeling for how well real gases obey the ideal-gas law and to determine the ideal-gas-law constant R. APPARATUS AND CHEMICALS: KClO

More information

Applied Physics Topics 2

Applied Physics Topics 2 Applied Physics Topics 2 Dr Andrey Varvinskiy Consultant Anaesthetist Torbay Hospital, UK EDAIC Paper B Lead and Examiner TOPICS 2 Gas Laws Other Laws: Dalton, Avogadro Critical temperature Critical pressure

More information